Suzette Grillot

Host of World Views

Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Suzette Grillot hosts this locally-produced show on KGOU.  Dean Grillot previously served as the College’s Associate Dean from July 2008-June 2012 and was essential to its creation and development. Additionally, she serves as the William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and the Vice Provost of International Programs. She has been recognized with the Gary B. Cohen Distinguished Faculty Award, was named the Educator’s Leadership Academy Outstanding Professor, and was recipient of the OU President’s Distinguished Faculty Mentor Award.

Dean Grillot is a prolific author, with articles published in the British Journal of Political Science, International Politics, and Contemporary Security Policy, among many others. She recently co-edited the book, Understanding the Global Community and co-authored the books Protecting Our Ports: National and International Security of Containerized Freight (2010) and The International Arms Trade (2009).

Trained in international relations, security studies and comparative politics, Dean Grillot teaches several dynamic courses each semester, focusing on subjects such as Global Security, International Activism, Illicit Trafficking, and International Politics, Literature and Film. Dean Grillot’s curiosity about the world and its people has led her to spend a semester teaching in Macedonia as a Fulbright Scholar (2003) and a semester as a teaching fellow at Beijing University in China (2007).

Ways To Connect

Syria Comment blogger Joshua Landis provides analysis of President Bashar Assad’s interview this week with the BBC, and Rebecca Cruise discusses German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s visit with President Obama, and what they’re trying to accomplish regarding Ukraine. 

Then Rebecca talks with Kathryn Bolkovac, who sued her employers for unfair dismissal after she lost her job for trying to expose sex trafficking in Bosnia. Her story was dramatized in the 2010 film The Whistleblower.

Rebecca Cruise explains this week’s court ruling that no genocide was proven in the 1990s Serbia-Croatia conflict, and Joshua Landis describes the complex relationship between Jordan and the self-proclaimed Islamic State in light of the brutal murder of a Jordanian fighter pilot.

Then I’m joined by journalist Franz Bumeder. As a German radio correspondent in the 1990s, he reported on those wars in Kosovo, Bosnia, Croatia, and Macedonia.

Besieged Sarajevo residents collect firewood in the bitter winter of 1992.
Christian Maréchal / Wikimedia Commons

The Yugoslav Wars were characterized by multiple war crimes and crimes against humanity such as acts of genocide and the use of systematic rape as a weapon of war.

“This was my first experience of war,” says Franz Bumeder, who was in Zagreb, Croatia at the start of the Croatian War of Independence in 1991.

But Bumeder was not there as a fighter or a humanitarian worker. He was there as a journalist, sent by a public news channel in Munich to report on the unfolding war.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss President Obama’s recent trip to India, and this week’s legislative elections in Greece that saw huge left-wing parliamentary gains and a new coalition government.

Then University of New Hampshire historian Nicoletta Gullace discusses her work tracing how changing turn-of-the-century gender roles led to women's increased participation in war activities.

Two nurses tend to wounded inside an ambulance-train ward, France, during World War I. Ambulance trains were used in the main to transport large groups of soldiers to the French coast so that they could return to England for treatment.
David McLellan / National Library of Scotland

The demands of two world wars and changing gender roles opened the way for women to gain more rights as citizens in the United States and Britain.

Before the 20th century, women in the United States and Britain couldn’t vote in national elections and generally weren’t seen as key players in war efforts. With the professionalization of military nursing during the Crimean War, women’s participation in war efforts grew and paved the way for women’s heavy involvement between 1914 and 1918.

Joshua Landis discusses Tuesday night’s State of the Union address and President Obama’s proposal to combat the self-proclaimed Islamic State, and Rebecca Cruise provides an update on anti-Islam protests in Leipzig, Germany.

Then Joshua and Suzette Grillot talk with University of Oklahoma sociologist Loretta Bass about first- and second-generation immigrant populations in France, and revisit issues of race and identity.

Protesters in Germany, January 19, 2015
Sozialfotografie [►] StR / Flickr

Strong crowds showed up for anti-Islam rallies in the German cities of Dresden, Leipzig, and Duisburg throughout the month as part of weekly rallies organized by a group called Patriotic Europeans against the Islamization of the West, or PEGIDA.

Protesters have been wearing black ribbons to show their solidarity with the victims last week's terror attacks in Paris.

President Obama delivers his annual State of the Union address Tuesday night before a joint session of Congress.
The White House / Twitter

President Obama spent very little time on foreign policy and foreign affairs during Tuesday night's State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress.

But he did call on lawmakers to pass a resolution authorizing the use of force against self-proclaimed Islamic State militants.

French flags
Quinn Dombrowski / Flickr

The relationship between racial identity and national identity is a contentious subject in France.

France’s National Assembly voted in 2013 to remove any references to race from national legislation, and French President François Hollande has asserted his belief that racial distinctions have no place in French society.

University of Oklahoma sociologist Loretta Bass calls this attitude toward racial issues the “Ostrich Policy.”

University of Oklahoma Latin America historian Alan McPherson joins Suzette Grillot for a conversation about what the lifting of trade and travel restrictions could mean for U.S.-Cuban relations.

Then a conversation with Boston University scholar David Collier. Sixty-five years ago Iran unsuccessfully experimented with democracy, and he argues the Islamic Republic can build on this legacy. 

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