KGOU

Suzette Grillot

Host of World Views

Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Suzette Grillot hosts this locally-produced show on KGOU.  Dean Grillot previously served as the College’s Associate Dean from July 2008-June 2012 and was essential to its creation and development. Additionally, she serves as the William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and the Vice Provost of International Programs. She has been recognized with the Gary B. Cohen Distinguished Faculty Award, was named the Educator’s Leadership Academy Outstanding Professor, and was recipient of the OU President’s Distinguished Faculty Mentor Award.

Dean Grillot is a prolific author, with articles published in the British Journal of Political Science, International Politics, and Contemporary Security Policy, among many others. She recently co-edited the book, Understanding the Global Community and co-authored the books Protecting Our Ports: National and International Security of Containerized Freight (2010) and The International Arms Trade (2009).

Trained in international relations, security studies and comparative politics, Dean Grillot teaches several dynamic courses each semester, focusing on subjects such as Global Security, International Activism, Illicit Trafficking, and International Politics, Literature and Film. Dean Grillot’s curiosity about the world and its people has led her to spend a semester teaching in Macedonia as a Fulbright Scholar (2003) and a semester as a teaching fellow at Beijing University in China (2007).

Ways to Connect

Thom Shanker spent nearly 14 years covering the Pentagon for The New York Times, and says U.S. foreign policy should be about earning respect and trust instead of winning hearts and minds. He’ll also talk with Suzette Grillot about his book Counterstrike that focuses on the U.S. campaign against Al Qaeda.

But first, Suzette and Rebecca Cruise discuss the North Korean Workers Party's first Congress in nearly four decades, new details about American missionary Kenneth Bae's time in a North Korean prison camp, and the cruise ship from Miami that docked in Cuba this week.

Restaurant diners watch a broadcast of the 7th Congress of the Workers' Party of Korea on local television, where North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is seen delivering a speech on Friday, May 6, 2016, in Pyongyang, North Korea.
Wong Maye-E / Associated Press

North Korea, past and present, is at the top of the international consciousness this week.

The reclusive country convened the Seventh Workers’ Party Congress in Pyongyang on Friday. It’s the highest political gathering the country holds, and the country hasn’t held one in 36 years, before the current leader Kim Jong-un was born. During the Sixth Party Congress in 1980, then-leader Kim Il-sung announced his son Kim Jong-il would succeed him. The second-generation Kim led the country from 1994 until his death in 2011.

The New York Times' Pentagon correspondent Thom Shanker interviews Defense Secretary Robert Gates aboard an aircraft headed for West Point, New York, April 21, 2008.
Cherie Cullen / U.S. Department of Defense

Thom Shanker took a job as the Pentagon correspondent for The New York Times in May 2001. Four months later hijackers crashed American Airlines Flight 77 into the western wall of the building during the September 11 attacks, and he spent the next 14 years covering the war on terror.

Joshua Landis and Suzette Grillot discuss several stories in the Middle East he’s been following this week, including President Obama’s visit to Saudi Arabia and the latest from Syria.

Then University of Oklahoma educational psychologist Janette Habashi joins Suzette to talk about her charity Child’s Cup Full, and her work providing musical instruments to refugee children in the West Bank.

President Obama meets with King Salman during a 2015 trip to Saudi Arabia.
Pete Souza / The White House

On Friday, France’s foreign minister described talks over Syria’s future as entering a “danger zone.” Opposition leaders have stepped away from the negotiating table in Geneva, accusing the regime led by Syrian president Bashar al-Assad of violating the cease-fire the U.S. and Russia painfully put together.

Representative of Assad’s regime might not even be at the negotiating table without Russia’s intervention. Airstrikes helped Syrian forces take back territory, put the rebels on their heel, and attack ISIS positions in the ancient city of Palmyra.

A girl in the West Bank plays with a handmade calendar created by Child's Cup Full
Child's Cup Full

University of Oklahoma human relations professor Janette Habashi grew up was born in Jerusalem, but left to pursue graduate work in England and the United States. But her native West Bank has never been far from her heart.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the story that dominated international news this week - the so-called “Panama Papers” and the law firm at the center of the leak.

Then Cruise talks with University of Texas at Austin historian Toyin Falola, who dropped out of high school to join a post-colonial peasant rebellion in southwest Nigeria. It took the life of his grandfather, and became the driving force behind everything he does.

A protester in Reykjavik on April 4, 2016 holds up a sign displaying her anger with Iceland's Prime Minister Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson announced he would take a leave of absence after being linked to the Panama Papers.
Art Bicnick / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The release of the so-called “Panama Papers” – more than 11 million documents and personal files detailing financial information and offshore accounts of prominent individuals – dominated the international news cycle this week. It’s raised questions about the role of technology and the expectation of privacy.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss two sides of international education. China has charged an education advocate in Tibet with inciting separatism, and a one-room basement library in Afghanistan is providing books to citizens once ruled by the Taliban.

Then contributor Joshua Landis talks with Jeffrey Mankoff from the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He argues the U.S. tried to outsource solving the Ukraine crisis onto German Chancellor Angela Merkel. They’ll also discuss Russia’s involvement in Syria.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss some of the international reaction to this year’s presidential candidate, and how other countries view some of the candidates.

Then Suzette talks with University of Central Oklahoma political scientist Husam Mohamad. He argues U.S. support toward a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is more of a shift in rhetoric rather than actual power.

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