Suzette Grillot

Host of World Views

Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Suzette Grillot hosts this locally-produced show on KGOU.  Dean Grillot previously served as the College’s Associate Dean from July 2008-June 2012 and was essential to its creation and development. Additionally, she serves as the William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and the Vice Provost of International Programs. She has been recognized with the Gary B. Cohen Distinguished Faculty Award, was named the Educator’s Leadership Academy Outstanding Professor, and was recipient of the OU President’s Distinguished Faculty Mentor Award.

Dean Grillot is a prolific author, with articles published in the British Journal of Political Science, International Politics, and Contemporary Security Policy, among many others. She recently co-edited the book, Understanding the Global Community and co-authored the books Protecting Our Ports: National and International Security of Containerized Freight (2010) and The International Arms Trade (2009).

Trained in international relations, security studies and comparative politics, Dean Grillot teaches several dynamic courses each semester, focusing on subjects such as Global Security, International Activism, Illicit Trafficking, and International Politics, Literature and Film. Dean Grillot’s curiosity about the world and its people has led her to spend a semester teaching in Macedonia as a Fulbright Scholar (2003) and a semester as a teaching fellow at Beijing University in China (2007).

Ways to Connect

President Obama addresses the Paris climate talks - November 30, 2015.
UNclimatechange / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Leaders and officials from more than 150 countries gathered in Paris this week to discuss climate change a potential deal to reduce emissions and reduce humanity’s carbon footprint. The developed world has been hesitant to lower carbon emissions, but they’re also hesitant to provide funding to the developing world in order to produce technologies that do that.

British protesters gather for a sit-in in London's Parliament Square Dec. 1, 2015 ahead of a vote to authorize increased military intervention in Syria.
Allsdare Hickson / FLickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

On Wednesday, bombs began falling in Syria hours after Britain’s Parliament voted overwhelmingly to approve airstrikes against ISIS militants in the country.

The 320-211 vote followed hours of debate, and could be a sign Europeans are starting to coalesce around a common goal of defeating radical Islamic militants in the wake of last month’s terrorist attacks in Paris, and security concerns in Brussels.

Flags outside the United Nations headquarters in New York.
Aotearoa / Wikimedia Commons

The State Department Joe Cassidy began working for in 1989 was very different than the one he left earlier this year.

He started his career before the Berlin Wall fell, and retired in May after 25 years in the Foreign Service. The U.S. is now embroiled in a Syrian quagmire with broad geopolitical implications, and no resolution on the horizon. He’s also seen the fall of the Soviet Union and the resurgence of Russia under a powerful leader who wants his country to become a major international player.

illuminated keyboard
Jeroen Bennink / Flickr

For the past quarter century, communications technology has evolved and grown the point where practically every business, service, and family platform is connected to the internet.

But that interconnectivity was approached from a from a commercial development approach, according to cybersecurity expert Melissa Hathaway. That means the first-to-market, free market approach means security and resilience weren’t concerns as the internet was embedded in critical infrastructure.

Law enforcement vehicles on the streets of Brussels, November 22, 2015.
Miguel Discart / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

The city of Brussels was on lockdown earlier this week after threats of more terrorist attacks in western Europe. Schools, museums, government offices, public transportation, and shops all ground to a halt in order to prevent another attack like the Nov. 13 bombings and shootings in Paris. Most of the restrictions have now been lifted.

Joshua Landis and Rebecca Cruise talk about what's changed (or hasn't) since the Paris and Beiruit terrorist attacks a week ago, and whether or not the world will ever come to an agreement about how to deal with ISIS.

Then, Suzette Grillot talks with Vanessa Tucker from the international watchdog organization Freedom House. Every year the group issues rankings that compare the global political rights and civil liberties across the globe.

Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Since its founding in 1941 to combat spreading Nazism during World War II, the non-governmental organization Freedom House has expanded its mission to measure the rights and civil liberties of 209 countries and territories around the world using a quantified scale.

Suzette Grillot and Brian Hardzinski discuss Catalonia's push for independence from Spain, and Russia's "frozen zone" in the troubled region of eastern Ukraine.

Then Rebecca Cruise talks with Peter Lochery. He’s the Director of Water for the Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere, or CARE, and won the University of Oklahoma WaTER Center's 2015 Internaitonal Water Prize.

Historian Beeta Baghoolizadeh says 19th century Iranian slavery can appear softer alongside its American counterpart, but that’s not a fair comparison. She'll trace the country's history of slavery and its erasure from the national consciousness.

But first, Joshua Landis joins the show again for a discussion of the Russian airliner that crashed in Egypt and what may have caused it, and Turkey’s recent parliamentary elections.

"...a thoroughly modern sculpture by the Scandinavian artist Clara Sörnäs.   It shows five slave figures, slightly larger than life, chained together in a pit.
missy & the universe / Flickr

Iran only abolished slavery in 1928, but since then, it’s been largely erased from the national consciousness. Historian Beeta Baghoolizadeh, who studies Iranian slavery, says the taboo surrounding slavery and Iran’s effort to distance itself from its past is due to its precarious position on the world stage 87 years later.

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