Suzette Grillot

Host of World Views

Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Suzette Grillot hosts this locally-produced show on KGOU.  Dean Grillot previously served as the College’s Associate Dean from July 2008-June 2012 and was essential to its creation and development. Additionally, she serves as the William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and the Vice Provost of International Programs. She has been recognized with the Gary B. Cohen Distinguished Faculty Award, was named the Educator’s Leadership Academy Outstanding Professor, and was recipient of the OU President’s Distinguished Faculty Mentor Award.

Dean Grillot is a prolific author, with articles published in the British Journal of Political Science, International Politics, and Contemporary Security Policy, among many others. She recently co-edited the book, Understanding the Global Community and co-authored the books Protecting Our Ports: National and International Security of Containerized Freight (2010) and The International Arms Trade (2009).

Trained in international relations, security studies and comparative politics, Dean Grillot teaches several dynamic courses each semester, focusing on subjects such as Global Security, International Activism, Illicit Trafficking, and International Politics, Literature and Film. Dean Grillot’s curiosity about the world and its people has led her to spend a semester teaching in Macedonia as a Fulbright Scholar (2003) and a semester as a teaching fellow at Beijing University in China (2007).

Ways to Connect

Today on the program, Suzette Grillot speaks with Georgia Tech political scientist Jarrod Hayes about how common identities influence international politics.

But first, Rebecca Cruise discusses this week’s bombing in Thailand, and Thursday’s announcement by Greek Prime Minister Alexisi Tsipras that he’s resigning and calling snap elections.

United States President Barack Obama meets with Stephen Harper in Ottawa.
Pete Souza / The White House

In the international arena, social dynamics and shared identities are as important in shaping relationships as they are among individuals.

“We can think about identities as shared systems of meaning that we use to interpret the world because the world is very chaotic, very messy,” says Georgia Institute of Technology political scientist Jarrod Hayes.

These shared systems of meaning are not only important in how we interact on an individual level, but also have a significant impact in international relations.

T'ien-wen Chu's work 'Notes of a Desolate Man'
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Taiwan’s past is complicated, and with that comes a fraught linguistic history.

Dutch settlers colonized the small island nestled between the South and East China Seas during the 17th century, but its former name Formosa actually means “beautiful island” in Portuguese. Just a few decades letter, China’s Qing Dynasty drove European colonists from Taiwan and controlled it for the next two centuries, until they lost control of the island during the war with the Japanese in 1905.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the problem of shipping hazardous material in light of the Chinese port explosion, Amnesty International’s announcement that they want to see the sex trade decriminalized, and the African continent's first full year without a polio case.

Then, Suzette talks with Taiwanese author T’ien-Wen Chu. She won the University of Oklahoma's Newman Prize for Chinese Literature for her collection of short stories that intimately draws the reader into the text, and chronicles Taiwan's fraught linguistic past.

The memorial in Nagasaki, Japan marking the location of ground zero of the August 9, 1945 nuclear attack.
Dean S. Pemberton / Wikimedia Commons

Seventy years ago Thursday, the United States dropped the first of two atomic bombs on the Empire of Japan – the opening salvo to the final days of World War II. The attack on Hiroshima, and Nagasaki three days later, killed as many as 200,000 people, and remain the only times nuclear weapons have ever been used against another nation.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss efforts to control the proliferation of nuclear weapons during and after the Cold War as the world marks 70 years since the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Then Suzette talks with Greek filmmaker Vassilis Loules, who uses the medium to show how hope persists through the past’s darkest times. His documentary Kisses to the Children tells the stories of five Greek Jewish children who survived the Holocaust.

Nearly 20 years ago, documentary filmmaker Vassilis Loules visited the Jewish Museum in Athens, where he was moved by seeing objects from Greek Jewish children hidden during the Holocaust.

Rami Khouri, Director, Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs, Lebanon during the Global Redesign Series: The Middle East G20 Imperative at the World Economic Forum on the Middle East 2009.
World Economic Forum / Flickr

With civil wars raging in Iraq, Syria, and Libya, a wave of radicalization of Tunisian youths, and general political and economic instability throughout the Arab World, the immediate aftermath of the Arab Spring has been violent and chaotic.

But as journalist Rami Khouri points out, solving centuries of political and social problems is a long and imperfect process.

World Views: July 24, 2015

Jul 24, 2015

Guest host Rebecca Cruise is joined by University of Oklahoma professor and European Union expert Mitchell Smith about how Greece got to its current economic crisis, and why its citizens are still on a "quest for hope."

Then Suzette Grillot talks with geographer Kathleen O’Reilly about the gender and social issues of sanitation projects in India.

A public latrine in a slum near Bangalore, India.
SuSanA Secretariat / Flickr

As of last year, India accounted for around 60 percent of the 2.5 billion people globally without access to a toilet, creating a serious sanitation crisis throughout India.

“What we’re talking about is the spread of disease, but we’re also talking about loss of health. We’re talking about loss of labor time,” said geographer Kathleen O’Reilly.

Pages