Suzette Grillot

Host of World Views

Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Suzette Grillot hosts this locally-produced show on KGOU.  Dean Grillot previously served as the College’s Associate Dean from July 2008-June 2012 and was essential to its creation and development. Additionally, she serves as the William J. Crowe, Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and the Vice Provost of International Programs. She has been recognized with the Gary B. Cohen Distinguished Faculty Award, was named the Educator’s Leadership Academy Outstanding Professor, and was recipient of the OU President’s Distinguished Faculty Mentor Award.

Dean Grillot is a prolific author, with articles published in the British Journal of Political Science, International Politics, and Contemporary Security Policy, among many others. She recently co-edited the book, Understanding the Global Community and co-authored the books Protecting Our Ports: National and International Security of Containerized Freight (2010) and The International Arms Trade (2009).

Trained in international relations, security studies and comparative politics, Dean Grillot teaches several dynamic courses each semester, focusing on subjects such as Global Security, International Activism, Illicit Trafficking, and International Politics, Literature and Film. Dean Grillot’s curiosity about the world and its people has led her to spend a semester teaching in Macedonia as a Fulbright Scholar (2003) and a semester as a teaching fellow at Beijing University in China (2007).

Ways To Connect

China is gaining ground in a land dispute with its neighbors - literally. Rebecca Cruise discusses the country’s rapid environmental transformation of an archipelago in the South China Sea.

Then Arun Gandhi, the grandson of legendary Indian civil rights leader Mahatma Gandhi, talks about lessons from his grandfather and applying his family’s legacy to the 21st century.

Satellite images from March 17, 2015 show new structures and construction equipment present on Mischief Reef in the South China Sea
DigitalGlobe/Asia Maritime Transparency Institute / Center for Strategic and International Studies

China is gaining ground in a land dispute with its neighbors – literally.

For decades, China, Vietnam, and the Philippines have fought over an archipelago known as the Spratly Islands.

Arun Gandhi, grandson of Indian civil rights leader Mahatma Gandhi
Provided /

Mahatma Gandhi preached a philosophy of nonviolence, understanding, and the search for truth. 67 years after Gandhi’s death, his grandson Arun Gandhi continues spreading that message of peace and carries on his legacy.

The younger Gandhi grew up in South Africa under apartheid and faced constant prejudice because of the color of his skin.

Joshua Landis and Suzette Grillot discuss this week’s nuclear negotiations with Iran, and the release of al-Qaeda prisoners in Yemen and air strikes led by a Saudi coalition.

Later, a conversation with the former director of the National Clandestine Service Michael Sulick. The 30-year CIA veteran argues information leaks by people like Chelsea Manning and Edward Snowden can cause far more problems than traditional spying ever did.

Michael Sulick, an American intelligence officer who served as Director of the U.S. National Clandestine Service from 2007-2010.
Sofarsogood2012 / Wikimedia Commons

Ukrainian Prime Misnister Arsenily Yatsenyuk said Friday that he thinks Russia might carry out a new offensive in the east of Ukraine, in spite of the ceasefire agreement reached in February.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise spent the week working in Rio de Janeiro, and review their impressions of a dynamic and vibrant Brazil.

Later, Rebecca talks with Harvard University political scientist Beth Simmons. She studies transnational crime, and they'll discuss her work framing the debate on human rights.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise are in Washington, D.C. this week, and discuss some of the comments they've been hearing about U.S-Iranian nuclear talks, and the implications of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's reelection.

Then, a conversation with Texas A&M University political scientist Mohammad Tabaar about international sources of Iran's domestic politics. He argues Iran is actually one of the most pro-American countries in the Muslim World.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, flanked deputies, sits across from Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif and other advisers on March 17, 2015, in Lausanne, Switzerland, before resuming negotiations about the future of Iran's nuclear program.
U.S. Department of State / Flickr

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif met on Monday in the latest round of nuclear talks. Iran and Western governments have been working on negotiations with the goal of reducing the size of Iran’s nuclear program in exchange for the lifting sanctions imposed on the country.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot talk about racism and bigotry in a global context in light of this week’s events involving the University of Oklahoma's chapter of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. 

Then journalist and activist Hannah Storm from the International News Safety Institute explains about how much protection correspondents can reasonably expect as modern warfare evolves.

Muhammad Jassim Abdulkarim Olayan al-Dhafiri, known as "Jihadi John" in an ISIS video with two Japanese hostages who were later killed by self-proclaimed Islamic State militants.

On February 28, Ukranian journalist Sergei Nikolayev died shortly after being taken to a hospital for wounds sustained in an artillery attack in the Donetsk region of Ukraine. It’s just one recent example of the extreme danger journalists face every day around the globe.