KGOU

Ted Streuli

Editor, The Journal Record

Ted Streuli is the editor of The Journal Record, a weekday newspaper and online publisher of business, political and legal news for Oklahoma. He regularly reports for the Business Intelligence Report, heard each week on KGOU.

Streuli has led The Journal Record’s newsroom since 2004. He has nearly 30 years of journalism experience, having worked at newspapers in Oklahoma, Texas and California.

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Emergency Department director Dr. Robin Mantooth and Chief Operating Officer John Manfredo lead a tour of the department at Norman Regional Health System’s new hospital building in Moore on January 17, 2017.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

One of Oklahoma’s health information exchanges will close. Coordinated Care Oklahoma announced on Monday that the non-profit organization plans to fold.

Health information exchanges let healthcare providers share and access records across hospitals. Journal Record reporter Sarah Terry Cobo writes that Coordinated Care  as in the process of merging with a competitor called MyHealth Access Network before making its sudden decision.

Roy Diehl removes the “Open” sign from the entrance to Urban Agrarian at 1235 SW Second St. in Oklahoma City Tuesday , Jan. 10, 2017.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

One of the anchors of Oklahoma City’s Farmers Market District is shutting down. Urban Agrarian is a local food distribution hub. Its owner announced this Monday that he is closing the business.

Urban Agrarian owner Matt Burch worked with Oklahoma farmers to bring their products to Oklahoma City and other cities’ farmers markets. In Oklahoma City, he sold products directly to consumers and to restaurants that wanted locally-grown produce.

Tiffany Batdorf is the business improvement district chief executive for Oklahoma City’s Adventure District.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

Oklahoma City’s Adventure District is home to some big attractions, such as the zoo, Remington Park, the National Softball Hall of Fame and Science Museum Oklahoma. But development has been slow in the area, and some residents and business owners are voicing their displeasure.

Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett listens to a slideshow presentation on the city’s MAPS projects during a special session of the Oklahoma City Council Tuesday at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Earlier this week the Oklahoma City Council met for a special session at the Cox Convention Center in downtown Oklahoma City to discuss the general obligation bond to pay for city government that will go before voters in 2017.

The GE Global Research Center in Oklahoma City.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Over the next week City Council members will consider adding a new tax increment finance, or TIF, district to Oklahoma City.

Computer screen with heathcare.gov open.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Seven weeks from now Donald Trump will become the 45th president of the United States. One of his signature campaign promises involved repealing or changing the hallmark legislative achievement of his predecessor – the Affordable Care Act.

Overhauling or undoing such a complex healthcare law nationwide won’t be a simple task, according to The Journal Record’s editor-in-chief Ted Streuli.

Raul Font is president of the Latino Community Development Agency in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Immigration dominated the 2016 presidential election, with promises from President-elect Donald Trump to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico, and a clampdown on undocumented migrants from both Latin America and the Middle East.

Mass deportations could have a significant affect on Oklahoma City’s economy, especially south Oklahoma City, where there’s a significant Hispanic population.

The SandRidge Energy Inc. logo is seen on a vehicle parked at the company headquarters in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Over the past week or so Oklahoma City’s energy companies have been releasing their quarterly earnings reports, and some of the more interesting numbers came from SandRidge Energy. After the stock market closed Tuesday, the company reported a net loss of $404 million for the quarter.

Jim Calloway addresses the audience during an Oklahoma Bar Association conference on business skills at the Sheraton Oklahoma City Downtown Hotel on Wednesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

In today’s business climate, attorneys have to think more like a CEO who runs a company rather than someone who just practices law.

That’s according to Jim Calloway, who’s the head of the Oklahoma Bar Association’s Management Assistance Program.

A man enters the Skirvin Hilton Hotel in downtown Oklahoma City Tuesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

On Tuesday, the City of Oklahoma City announced hotel/motel tax collections fell for the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2017, and were down even below the most conservative estimates.

The so-called “tourist tax” was down 5.9 percent compared to FY 16, but 2.7 percent below estimates. The Journal Record’s editor Ted Streuli says the effect was felt city-wide, but the downturn really differs based on geography.

A road sign informs motorists of the closure of the intersection of Reno Avenue and E.K. Gaylord Boulevard in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

If you’ve been to downtown Oklahoma City in the past year, you’ve probably had to weave your way around concrete barriers, dodge traffic cones, and been yelled at by your GPS due to a significant amount of construction at the base of tall office buildings.

A lot of that is part of Oklahoma City’s Project 180, which grew out of tax increment financing that helped build Devon Tower.

The Smart Saver grocery store at NE 23rd Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

About two years ago the City of Oklahoma City granted tax increment finance, or TIF status to the Northeast 23rd Street, Martin Luther King, and Kelley Avenue corridors as part of a project it's calling the Northeast Renaissance.

An artist’s conception of a proposed hotel that would be attached to downtown Oklahoma City’s new convention center.
Provided / Omni Hotel and Resorts

Earlier this week, the Oklahoma City Council voted 7-2 to pursue negotiations with the developer Omni for a proposed hotel attached to downtown Oklahoma City’s new convention center that’s part of the MAPS 3 series of projects.

Shekeyra Goodman sets a table in an event room Tuesday at the Embassy Suites Oklahoma City Downtown/Medical Center.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

On Tuesday, the Oklahoma Hotel and Lodging Association held its annual forecasting luncheon at the Skirvin in downtown Oklahoma City. The group’s figures show hotel demand in the state dropped 3.5 percent, while the supply was up 2.9 percent.

One of the presenters, Jan Freitag, basically said this decline all has to do with the price of oil, and that the demand for hotel rooms used to grow by 8 percent annually.

The abandoned Lantana Apartments complex at 7408 NW 10th St. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The big news that came out of this week’s Oklahoma City Council meeting involved the body formally voicing its opposition to State Question 777 – the so-called “right-to-farm” proposal.

Doors are closed at ITT Technical Institute’s campus inside 50 Penn Place in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuch / The Journal Record

Earlier this week ITT Technical Institute immediately closed every campus across the country. Filings last year with the Securities and Exchange Commission show that affects nearly 45,000 sites, including two in Oklahoma.  – one in Oklahoma City, the other in Tulsa.

Workers install a glass panel on the new Bank of Oklahoma building in downtown Oklahoma City, August 26, 2016.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Tax increment finance, or TIF, districts allow developers to offset some of their projects’ costs by accessing public funding – Oklahoma City’s “Core to Shore” area between downtown and the Oklahoma River and the University North Park shopping center along 24th Ave. NW in Norman come to mind.

Workers construct new homes at 12th Avenue NW and Tecumseh Road in Norman.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

National figures out this week from the U.S. Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development showed sales of new single-family homes rose more than 12 percent between June and July.

The seasonally adjusted annual rate of 654,000 units is the highest since October 2007 -  right around the time the housing bubble burst. But home construction is showing in the U.S., according to the National Association of Home Builders.

Cattle are moved after auction at the Oklahoma City Stockyards.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association is still struggling to find support for a statewide marketing program.

Ranchers and other agriculture producers have been very active in their collective support of State Question 777, which would amend the state constitution to stringently limit lawmakers’ ability to regulate the industry.

The Wheeler Ferris Wheel is shown behind signage at Oklahoma City’s Wheeler District.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

On Tuesday the Oklahoma City Council took another step toward creating a tax increment financing, or TIF, district for the Wheeler neighborhood near downtown, just south of the Oklahoma River.

The area on either side of Western Ave. north of SW 20th Street will eventually have housing, offices, retail, and the centerpiece has already gone up - a 100-foot tall Ferris wheel.

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