All Things Considered on KGOU

Mon-Thur 4-7pm and Fri 4:30-6:30pm
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish

All Things Considered brings listeners the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. The program has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Local updates from Susan Shannon
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Composer ID: 
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Parallels
4:42 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

Why Everyone's Talking About Israel's New Justice Minister

Ayelet Shaked of the right-wing Jewish Home party, shown here on May 6, is Israel's new justice minister. During her two years in parliament, she called for bringing more conservative judges to Israel's highest court.
Gali Tibbon AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 2:33 pm

Among the faces in Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's new right-wing government, one is drawing particular attention: Ayelet Shaked, the new justice minister.

Shaked is secular, lives in liberal Tel Aviv, and has a background in the high-tech industry. Ari Soffer, the managing editor of Israel National News, calls her a patriot.

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Parallels
4:42 pm
Thu May 14, 2015

The Man Who Keeps Tabs On U.S. Money Spent In Afghanistan

John Sopko, Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, testifies on Capitol Hill last June. Sopko says the Afghans are still having trouble managing the money the U.S. sends to the country. The U.S. has spent $110 billion on Afghanistan's reconstruction since 2002.
Charles Dharapak ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 1:46 pm

John Sopko, whose job is to watch over U.S. government spending in Afghanistan, says it's not his job to be a cheerleader — it's to speak truth to power.

"I am often the bringer of bad news to people. Or at least that's what some people think," he says.

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It's All Politics
5:56 pm
Wed May 13, 2015

How Do You Say 'Snafu' In Japanese?

When Democratic opposition delayed a major Asia-Pacific trade deal, White House press secretary Josh Earnest was asked if the administration had to do some hand-holding with the 11 countries involved in the talks. "I don't know how 'snafu' translates into a variety of Asian languages," he said.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 6:02 pm

The Senate looks ready to move ahead with trade legislation, after a daylong delay that the Obama administration repeatedly described as a "snafu."

"These kinds of procedural snafus are not uncommon," said White House spokesman Josh Earnest after Democrats held up the bill, which would give President Obama authority to expedite passage of the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

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All Tech Considered
4:58 pm
Wed May 13, 2015

Facebook Courts News Giants Into A Deal To Share Viewers, And Revenues

Nine media organizations, including The New York Times and National Geographic, have signed a deal to distribute their content through a new Facebook feature called "Instant Articles."
Facebook

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 2:34 pm

In recent years, Twitter has become the go-to destination for news junkies. Now, Facebook is entering a deal with nine news organizations, including The New York Times, NBC News and Buzzfeed, to run some of their in-depth articles, photos and videos inside Facebook. No need to leave the app!

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Shots - Health News
4:58 pm
Wed May 13, 2015

Smokers More Likely To Quit If Their Own Cash Is On The Line

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 2:25 pm

A new study finds that employer-based programs to help people stop smoking would work better if they tapped into highly motivating feelings — such as the fear of losing money.

This conclusion flows from a study involving the employees of CVS/Caremark. Some workers got postcards asking them if they wanted a cash reward to quit smoking. One card ended up in the hands of Camelia Escarcega in Rialto, Calif., whose sister works for CVS.

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Around the Nation
4:56 pm
Wed May 13, 2015

Philadelphia Marks 30th Anniversary Of MOVE Bombing

Originally published on Wed May 13, 2015 5:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

U.S.
4:00 pm
Wed May 13, 2015

Standards For Child Migrants Could Force Detention Centers To Close

Family detention centers such as this one in Karnes City, Texas, could be forced to close after a judge ruled that holding children for long periods violates current standards.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Thu May 14, 2015 6:26 pm

Negotiations are underway between the U.S. government and immigration advocates over family detention after a federal judge issued a tentative ruling that detention facilities violate standards for children.

The result of the talks could force the three family detention centers operating in the U.S. — two in Texas and one in Berks County, Pa. — to close.

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Africa
3:53 pm
Wed May 13, 2015

Army General Overthrows President Of Burundi In Apparent Coup

Originally published on Wed May 13, 2015 5:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Environment
3:53 pm
Wed May 13, 2015

Santa Fe Cuts Water Consumption By Imposing Tiered Pricing Model

Originally published on Wed May 13, 2015 5:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Now, to another city that's grown in population, but at the same time, has managed to cut its total water consumption, Santa Fe, N.M. We're going to find out how they've done that from Santa Fe's mayor, Javier Gonzalez. Welcome to the program.

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It's All Politics
6:57 pm
Tue May 12, 2015

Texas Sen. Doesn't Want Clergy 'Coerced' Into Officiating Same-Sex Marriages

Texas Republican state Sen. Craig Estes' bill reinforces that clergy would not have to perform same-sex marriages.
Harry Cabluck AP

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 7:09 pm

The Texas Legislature is sending a message this week on the subject of same-sex marriage. And that message is: Hell no — again.

The bill that just got initial approval in the Texas Senate would protect clergy from having to conduct any marriage ceremony or perform any service that would violate their sacred beliefs.

"We want to make sure they are not ever coerced into performing a marriage ceremony that would violate their sincerely held religious beliefs," State Sen. Craig Estes told NPR. Estes sponsored the bill.

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