All Things Considered on KGOU

Mon-Thur 4-7pm and Fri 4:30-6:30pm
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish

All Things Considered brings listeners the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. The program has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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News
3:08 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Obama Honors Victims Of Fort Hood Shooting

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 5:48 pm

President Obama is traveling to Fort Hood, Texas, on Wednesday to attend the memorial service for those killed in last week's shooting.

Around the Nation
3:08 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

In Some American Towns, The Billboards Will Have Sirens

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 5:48 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

When you notice a fire truck racing to the scene of a fire, the last thing you'd expect to see on the side of the truck is an ad for a local pizza restaurant. But that could be coming soon in some areas.

Mike Moen, of member station WNIJ in DeKalb, Illinois, reports on a small fire department that's embracing advertising to help fund emergency services.

(SOUNDBITE OF VEHICLES)

MIKE MOEN, BYLINE: On a recent morning, a fire truck belonging to

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: (Unintelligible)

(SOUNDBITE OF SIRENS)

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Technology
7:03 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Massive Security Flaw Picks The Padlock On Much Of The Internet

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 8:50 am

A serious bug has been discovered in one of the Internet's most popular encryption programs. The bug, introduced in 2012 and named "Heartbleed," allows an attacker the means to evade security and access credit card numbers or passwords supplied to companies online by users.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
5:21 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Putting Student Data To The Test To Identify Struggling Kids

Student Mack Godbee and mentor Natasha Santana-Viera go over Godbee's report card. Godbee's performance has improved since a data monitoring program identified him as a dropout risk.
Sammy Mack StateImpact Florida

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 4:24 am

At Miami Carol City Senior High in Florida, a handful of teachers, administrators and coaches are gathered around a heavy wooden table in a conference room dubbed the "War Room," looking through packets of information about several students.

There are others at the table, too: analysts from the group Talent Development Secondary, which monitors student data; City Year, a nonprofit that provides mentors; and Communities in Schools, which connects kids with health care and social services.

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Politics
5:21 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

White House Learns Complications Of Pay Equity Debate

Lilly Ledbetter speaks at the White House on Tuesday, during an event marking Equal Pay Day. President Obama announced new executive actions to strengthen enforcement of equal pay laws for women.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 4:24 am

Money and politics don't always make for polite conversation, but President Obama tried to tackle both at the White House on Tuesday.

Obama signed a pair of executive orders aimed at encouraging conversation about men's and women's pay scales. It's a talk that Democrats hope will yield political gains this year.

It also raised questions, though, about how the administration pays its own people.

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Shots - Health News
4:22 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

The Forgotten Childhood: Why Early Memories Fade

Francis Csedrik remembers details of being bonked hard on the head when he was 4, and having to go to the emergency room.
Meg Vogel NPR

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 5:13 am

Francis Csedrik, who is 8 and lives in Washington, D.C., remembers a lot of events from when he was 4 or just a bit younger. There was the time he fell "headfirst on a marble floor" and got a concussion, the day someone stole the family car ("my dad had to chase it down the block"), or the morning he found a black bat (the furry kind) in the house.

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Shots - Health News
4:08 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Wave Of Newly Insured Patients Strains Oregon Health Plan

Cheryl Stumph goes over paperwork with a medical worker. She finally has health insurance to take care of her family's medical needs.
Kristian Foden-Vencil for NPR

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 4:24 am

Millions of Americans who didn't have health insurance last year now do because of the Affordable Care Act.

In Lane County, Oregon, Trillium Community Health Plan is struggling to deal with a huge influx of new patients looking for health care. CEO Terry Coplin says the company figured 26,000 people would sign up in the first few years. Instead, about that many signed up right off the bat.

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History
4:08 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Developer To Preserve Ancient Tequesta Village In Heart Of Miami

A series of postholes sit on a site that some call a major archeological find, once home to a Tequesta village. A developer wants to build on the site, but agreed to preserve the village.
Greg Allen NPR

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 4:24 am

In downtown Miami, amidst the office buildings, shops and high-rise condos, visitors will soon be able to see a site historians are calling Miami's birthplace.

The spot where the Miami River meets Biscayne Bay used to be home to the Tequesta tribe, which is where Spanish explorers who first arrived in Florida in the early 1500s encountered them. Today, that spot is the heart of downtown Miami.

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Law
3:14 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

New Rules Force Big Banks To Keep A Bigger Cushion

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 4:24 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Five and a half years after the financial crisis that devastated the global economy, U.S. officials are taking steps to strengthen the nation's banking system. Today, the Federal Reserve and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation approved tough new rules that require banks to hold a lot more capital on their books. Regulators say the requirements will reduce the risk of bank failures during bad economic times.

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News
3:14 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

An Angry Hearing On The Hill For 'Cockamamie' Twitter-like Network

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 4:24 am

Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy was incensed that he only learned about the creation of a Twitter-like network in Cuba through press accounts. He had the chance Tuesday to vent his frustration when USAID administrator Rajiv Shah appeared before Leahy's committee.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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