All Things Considered on KGOU

Mon-Thur 4-7pm and Fri 4:30-6:30pm
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish

All Things Considered brings listeners the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. The program has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Local Anchor(s): 
Local updates from Susan Shannon
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Composer ID: 
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Shots - Health News
4:07 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

Filtering A New Idea: A Book That's Educational And 'Drinkable'

Contaminated water can spread diseases like cholera and typhoid. A new project aims to provide water filters in the form of an educational book.
Soe Than Win AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 9:32 pm

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Religion
4:07 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

Southern Baptist Leaders Seek Softer Approach To Homosexuality

Pastor Jimmy Scroggins (right) tells other Southern Baptist leaders to be compassionate to gay people during a leadership summit in April.
ERLC Leadership Summit/Flickr

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 5:29 pm

Some Christian denominations around the U.S. have been slowly warming to the idea of gay marriage. A few have even made an about-face.

Not so with the country's largest protestant group, Southern Baptists. The Southern Baptist Convention still preaches that marriage can only be between one man and one woman. But some pastors are softening their message.

A Change Of Tone

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Law
4:07 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

How It Happened: 10 Years Of Gay Marriage

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 1:05 am

On May 17 10 years ago, Massachusetts issued the first fully legal same-sex marriage license in the United States. Tanya McCloskey and Marcia Kadish were the recipients of that license. The growing acceptance of gay marriage in the U.S. is due in part to gay advertising and public support of gay-friendly workplace policies. Marketing expert David Paisley explains how that change happened to guest host Tess Vigeland.

Code Switch
5:36 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Federal Goverment Jeopardizes Navajo Family's Ties To Its Home

Navajo elder Stella Peshlakai Smith, 89, stands at a traditional dwelling on her homestead at Wupatki National Monument in 2014. The National Park Service says her children cannot stay when she dies.
Felicia Fonseca AP

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 9:46 am

At 89 years old, Stella Peshlakai Smith shuffles around her Arizona yard in white tennis shoes and a long traditional Navajo skirt. She points to her ceremonial home, called a hogan. "My father made this one [almost 100 years ago]," Smith says. Her modern house sits next door.

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This Week's Must Read
4:41 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

A 'New York Times' Shake-Up, But Not The One You're Thinking Of

Taxis speed past the headquarters of the New York Times.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 10:51 am

It's not all that often that the New York Times goes from printing the biggest stories of the day to actually being the biggest story of the day. But that's exactly what happened this week when the publisher, Arthur Sulzberger Jr. replaced Jill Abramson as the executive editor.

The Times has dealt with big problems before. I'm thinking of course about about Jayson Blair. Seth Mnookin's book, Hard News, is the definitive account of that saga. It's the story of an old line institution that allowed a snake to slip through unnoticed.

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The Two-Way
4:39 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Ancient Skeleton In Mexico Sheds Light On Americas Settlement

In this June 2013 photo provided by National Geographic, diver Susan Bird, working at the bottom of Hoyo Negro, a large dome-shaped underwater cave in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, brushes the Naia skull found at the site.
Paul Nicklen AP

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 7:00 pm

The nearly complete skeleton of a teenage girl who died some 12,000 to 13,000 years ago in a cave in the Yucatan Peninsula, has yielded DNA clues linking her to Native Americans living today.

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NPR Story
3:57 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

What's In A Name? Plenty Of Ways To Make A Mistake

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 7:00 pm

When Arizona State University graduates hear their names announced, they have Peter Lafford to thank. It's his job to ensure students' names are pronounced correctly — and it's not always an easy task.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

All Tech Considered
3:34 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

European Ruling On Removing Google Links May Leave A Mess

Legal experts say it's too soon to know the impact of a European court ruling that will require Google to remove some links upon request.
Virginia Mayo AP

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 7:31 pm

Google's lawyers are trying to make sense of a ruling they did not expect.

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Health Care
3:01 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

To Pay For Hepatitis C Drugs, Medicare Might Face A Steep Bill

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 7:00 pm

The federal Medicare program for the elderly and disabled will cover two new drugs that can cure hepatitis C, a liver disease that can cause cancer and lead to death. The drugs are very expensive, but they cure hepatitis C in most cases. The government and insurers are concerned about these costs; three million Americans have hepatitis C, most of whom don't know they have it.

Europe
3:01 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

After Eastern Ukrainian Steel Magnate Flexes Muscle, Barricades Fall

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 7:00 pm

Barricades in the eastern Ukrainian town of Mariupol have been dismantled, following a deal between separatist leaders, police and steelworkers from the city's biggest steel mill. The deal came after steel mill owner, billionaire Rinat Akhmetov, issued a statement saying the region's economic future depended on staying united with Ukraine.

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