All Things Considered on KGOU

Mon-Thur 4-7pm and Fri 4:30-6:30pm
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish

All Things Considered brings listeners the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. The program has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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Local updates from Susan Shannon
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Sports
3:37 pm
Mon April 28, 2014

NBA Weighs Penalties After Sterling's Alleged Race Remarks Surface

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 5:18 pm

Controversy is swirling around racist comments allegedly made by Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling. The NBA is exploring its potential responses as it investigates the allegations.

Education
8:52 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Struggling To Get Out Of Poverty: The 'Two Generation' Approach

Tiffany Contreras gives a presentation in a nutrition class at Tulsa Community College. She's pursuing a degree in nursing as part of the Career Advance program.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 1:15 pm

Policy makers and thinkers have long debated how best to help low-income families break the cycle of generational poverty. A lot of people think one key is high-quality early childhood education. Others say equally important is support parents with job training and education, to get them into stable, decent paying jobs.

In Tulsa, Okla., an experimental program is trying to do both. Career Advance gives vulnerable mothers access to high-quality preschool as well as to life coaching, financial incentives and intensive job training in in-demand fields like nursing and health care.

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Education
5:36 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Learning With Disabilities: One Effort To Shake Up The Classroom

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Samuel Habib, seen here at 3 years old, sits in his supportive corner chair in class. Samuel, who has cerebral palsy, is now 14 and is headed to high school. Dan Habib, Samuel's father, is an advocate for inclusion and made a film about his son called Including Samuel.
Dan Habib/includingsamuel.com

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 8:54 am

This is what an inclusive classroom looks like: Children with disabilities sit next to ones who've been deemed "gifted and talented." The mixing is done carefully, and quietly. Students don't necessarily know who's working at what level.

Despite a court ruling 25 years ago that gave children with disabilities equal access to general education activities, change has been slow.

Today, about 17 percent of students with any disability spend all or most of their days segregated. Children with severe disabilities can still expect that separation.

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Arts & Life
4:21 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Fair Or Not, Getting Kids To Eat Their Vegetables

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:23 pm

Pediatric nutritionist Dr. Deb Kennedy, author of The Picky Eating Solution, talks with NPR's Eric Westervelt about catering to kids who put up fights at the dinner table.

Science
4:21 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Astronaut Twins To Separate For The Sake Of Space Travel

Mark Kelly (left) will stay on Earth while his brother, Scott Kelly, spends a year on the International Space Station. NASA will test how the environments affect them differently.
NBC NewsWire NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:23 pm

This month, NASA revealed new details of the plan to send humans to Mars by 2030. It's an elaborate and expensive mission, involving a giant deep-space rocket, and roping an asteroid into the moon's orbit to use as a stepping stone to Mars.

But there are still some serious questions about a manned expedition to Mars. Namely, is it safe? That's where astronauts Scott and Mark Kelly come in. The Kelly brothers are identical twins, and the only siblings ever to both fly in space.

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Music Interviews
4:21 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

Reliving 'Dylan's Gospel': Bob's Songs Transformed

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 5:23 pm

In 1969, music producer Lou Adler assembled LA's top background singers for a gospel reading of Bob Dylan songs. NPR's Eric Westervelt speaks with Adler and Merry Clayton about the album's re-release.

Music Interviews
5:25 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

René Marie On Singing, Sex And The Importance Of Being Eartha

Jazz singer René Marie's latest release is I Wanna Be Evil: With Love to Eartha Kitt.
Janice Yim Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 12:54 pm

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Author Interviews
4:29 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

How An Army Officer And Diplomat Wrote His Way Through Trauma

Ron Capps talks with refugees in the Kisna Reka refugee camp some 15 miles from Pristina, Kosovo, in 1998. In his role as a U.S. diplomatic monitor, Capps traveled through Kosovo gathering intelligence from refugees and Serb forces about the situation in the region.
Santiago Lyon AP

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 5:25 pm

In five wars over 10 years, Ron Capps shifted back and forth between being a U.S. Army officer and a State Department foreign service officer in some of the world's deadliest places.

In Afghanistan, Iraq and elsewhere, he served as a senior military intelligence officer. In wartime Kosovo, Darfur and Rwanda, he worked as a diplomat out in the field, documenting violence and war. As he writes in his new memoir, all the while he was almost daily "in the midst of murder, rape, the burning of villages, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ethnic cleaning or genocide."

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Around the Nation
4:19 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

Fear For Sherpas' Future Grows With Each Climbing Tragedy

Relatives carry a casket bearing the body of a Mount Everest avalanche victim for cremation in Kathmandu on Monday.
Prakash Mathema AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 8:42 am

Sherpas have a great reputation as the world's best climbers. "Sherpa" is not some sort of honorific or title; it's the name of an ethnic group — a tiny one. There are around 150,000 of them in Nepal.

While they fight for their lives on treacherous mountain terrain, Sherpas also struggle to keep their community — and its values — alive.

If you are a Sherpa, it's noted right in your name, like Ang Galgen Sherpa, who lives in Queens, N.Y., home to the largest community of Sherpas in the U.S.

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NPR Story
4:19 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

Next Step In New Clemency Initiative: ID Who's Eligible

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 5:25 pm

Transcript

ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:

From the NPR West studios in Culver City, California it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Eric Westervelt. This coming week, the Federal Bureau of Prisons will send a notice to every inmate in its custody, all 216,000 of them. They're trying to reach the people serving more than 10 years in prison for nonviolent drug crimes. Their message: If you've shown good behavior, had no prior convictions and fulfill a few other criteria, you could receive clemency and go free.

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