KGOU

Assignment: Radio

Selected Sundays at 12 Noon

Assignment: Radio reflects KGOU's commitment to the future of  

Each semester KGOU staff work with  interested University of Oklahoma  (& more recently, East Central University) students to instruct and encourage them in the ways of audio storytelling and production. 

Student reporter/producers & interns meet each week to complete various assignments and tasks designed to develop their skills in  real-world fashion. Their work is graded, and they earn class credits for their participation. 

We are quite proud to point out that a good deal of this student-produced work has earned critical praise from serious journalistic organizations.   

University of Oklahoma geographer Laurel Smith
Provided

University of Oklahoma associate professor Laurel Smith's interest in geography takes her to places most people don’t have the opportunity to visit.

While working on her Ph.D. in geography at the University of Kentucky, she traveled to Mexico to study the indigenous peoples of Oaxaca.

Women stand in a circle, holding hands and singing "Make New Friends." Their children stand beside them. These powerful scenes are part of a documentary called Women Behind Bars: The Voices of Oklahoma’s Incarcerated Women and Their Children.

Moses Lauder

22-year-old Scott Wilson's room is filled with graffiti art, martial arts metals and a giant bookcase of books from the Charisma Myth series to The Lord Of The Rings. He takes pride in his varied interests, and strives to master as many of them as he can. That Renaissance worldview carries over into his educational and professional life.

Wilson co-founded CircaTree, a business that helps connect programmers and app creators with customers who have specific needs. But he didn't always want to be an entrepreneur -  he started out in politics. 

Assignment: Radio April 12, 2015

Apr 12, 2015

It's the next episode of the Spring 2015 season of Assignment: Radio. Lydia Theban, Pamela Ortega, East Central University's Caroline Harris and Hayley Thornton talk to a few fascinating people with interests from indigenous tribes to creating new apps and taking on the Digital World.  

    

Assignment: Radio March 29th, 2015

Mar 29, 2015
Jay Chilton

Sexual assault awareness month is just a few days away. Assignment: Radio’s Lydia Theban, Pamela Ortega, ECU’s Lisa Laxton and I found out that sexual violence touches the lives of people here in our community. Sexual assault prevention programs, personal stories and successes make up this weeks Assignment: Radio.

Assignment: Radio March 8th, 2015

Mar 8, 2015

It's the first episode of the Spring 2015 season of Assignment: Radio. Today, we’ll hear from some pint-sized salespeople ... check in with a college student who composes and directs musicals … and visit a homeless shelter in Oklahoma City.

The Benefits Of Volunteering

Mar 8, 2015

In 2013, Oklahoma was ranked the 5th worst state in the nation for extent childhood homelessness by The National Center of Family Homelessness. 1,481 homeless people can be found in a single night in Oklahoma City. City Rescue Mission in Oklahoma City works to fix these problems. Sonny is one of the 600 people that lives there and he says he hasn’t always gone without.

An art show in Oklahoma City also took a classic concept: Art, and turned it into a nontraditional event.For over a decade “Momentum” has been creating and recreating its exhibit to give young artists an occasion to show off their work.

Girl Scout Cookie Season Is Back In Oklahoma

Mar 8, 2015

It’s Girl Scout Cookie season around the country and Oklahoma is no stranger to this tasty tradition. Assignment: Radio’s Pamela Ortega tagged along with some of the scouts and learned that the demand for cookies has yet to slow down.

"Hello would you like to buy Girl Scout cookies?" Girl Scout, Emma says to a customer.

For these girls there is a greater purpose than just selling cookies, at least from Emma’s point of view.

Hayley Thornton / KGOU

Dance Magazine ranks The University of Oklahoma’s school of dance as one the top three dance schools in the country. Each year The Young Choreographers' Showcase gives the top 10 student choreographers a chance to show off the skills they have learned.

Painted text on the OU South Oval in late 2005.
Nik Madjan / Creative Commons

The University of Oklahoma's South Oval is a place of almost constant activity. Students pass out pamphlets, write notices on the gray concrete in chalk, offer free food and drinks, and sometimes enter into heated debates.

Such arguments are guaranteed in the first amendment, one of the most recognizable and most discussed sections of the Bill of Rights. The right to free speech is often cited, but not always completely understood.

“I think a lot of people believe that free speech rights are absolute,” OU Law Professor Joseph Thai says. “They also believe that the first amendment applies to private parties. Both of those beliefs are inaccurate.”

Thai teaches a class about the first amendment and notices that many students think that their constitutional right to free speech allows them to say whatever they want wherever they want.

“Free speech rights only apply against the government,” Thai says. “In other words, you don't have a free speech right vis a vis your private employer, or vis a vis your parent.”

Berit Watkin

In 1989, the Berlin wall was dismantled and by the next year, Germany was once again one country.  That meant consolidating East and West Germany, and often the West’s laws and culture prevailed over those of the East.

University of Oklahoma International Studies professor Rebecca Cruise is an expert on Eastern Europe.

Germany's Fascination With Native American Culture

Dec 3, 2014
Eklectique-photo

Last month marked the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. The University of Oklahoma held a symposium commemorating the event. Guest speakers came from around the world to lecture about their specific knowledge base around the fall of the Berlin Wall. Assignment: Radio’s Hayley Thornton attended expecting to learn about a culture on another continent. Instead she learned about German’s fascination with a culture closer to home.

Stephanie Frederic / Twitter

Since graduating from the University of Oklahoma in 1982, Stephanie Frederic has worked in radio, television and film in positions ranging from reporter to executive producer.

She now runs her own company, FGW Productions, which creates content aimed at black and Latino audiences. The name acronym stands for “Frederic Girl Working,” a reference to a phrase she heard often around Los Angeles, “That Frederic girl is always working.”

OU Professor Adapts To Digital Classroom

Nov 19, 2014
John Morgan / flikr

When they are not in class, college students always seem to be typing a text on their smart phones as they walk around the University of Oklahoma campus.

Certainly, technology has become an integral part of people’s daily lives with so many platforms --Twitter, Facebook and website and blogs – so many new ways of expression through social networking and the Internet.

This change affects everything, from social situations to business transactions, and for many, if you are not using digital devises, then you are in the dark ages.

Hayley Thornton / KGOU

In the 2004 comedy Mean Girls, Lindsay Lohan’s character describes some of the fashion choices young women make every October 31.

But with ever-shifting social boundaries, how exactly do you define what makes an “appropriate” Halloween costume?

child in a native american halloween costume
HalloweenCostumes.com / Google Images Creative Commons

The idea of “cultural appropriation” and the use of Native American attire made headlines earlier this year after Gov. Mary Fallin’s daughter Christina posted a photo of herself wearing a Native headdress on Instagram. But if you explore any Halloween costume shop this October and there is a good chance you will find Native American costumes, many featuring a feathered headdress.

But this year, some costume manufacturers are experiencing pushback from people that believe the costumes are culturally insensitive.

Assignment: Radio October 2014

Oct 15, 2014
Sarah Hurd

It's the first episode of the Fall 2014 season of Assignment: Radio. Student and KGOU employee Sarah Hurd and I explore some new events in Central Oklahoma. She gives a preview of a new, trendier food style and I give an in depth look at a local childhood cancer walk.

Emily Soreghan

The idea of local, sustainable food isn't new. It's pretty much the only way early settlers on the Oklahoma prairie didn't starve to death.

But in the 21st century, everything from home gardens, to restaurants, to huge organic agribusinesses help pass the practices, and the connection between the land and the food that comes from it, to future generations.

Katie Shauberger’s yard has two small garden plots, which she showed me on a cool September night. Katie is a senior at The University of Oklahoma and an avid gardener who has many reasons for growing her own food

CureSearch Walk Fights To Find Childhood Cancer Cure

Oct 14, 2014
Hayley Thornton

October gets a lot of attention as a month dedicated to raising awareness of breast cancer, but in September many organizations recognize childhood cancer. Last month the group CureSearch sponsored a walk to help raise research funds.

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