KGOU

Business Intelligence Report

Wednesdays

A weekly feature produced in partnership with the Journal Record, Oklahoma's weekday newspaper and website specializing in business, legislative and legal news. Editor Ted Streuli and Journal Record reporters discuss business and economic development in the state.

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The Devon Energy Center in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Crude oil prices continue to rise, but Oklahoma’s oil and gas companies are not necessarily popping any corks. Sarah Terry-Cobo writes in the Journal Record that crude oil hit its highest levels in three-and-a-half years on Friday, but it is more difficult to drillers to make a profit, even though prices have been near or above $60 per barrel since January.

Trucks pass each other along a rural road just off south of Kingfisher.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

A bill that would change how Oklahoma oversees trucking is drawing conflict of interest questions because the legislation’s sponsor owns trucks as part of his business.

A customer enters a Citibank, Thursday, March 16, 2017 in New York.
Mark Lennihan / AP Photo

National banking giant Citibank announced on March 21 that it would require retail clients to no longer sell firearms to customers under the age of 21. The bank is also requiring clients to no longer sell bump stocks and high-capacity magazines. The bank also condemned gun violence and what the financial institution considers a lack of action by lawmakers.

The interior of the 23rd Street Armory building, 200 NE 23rd St. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Two different entities turned in three bids to describe what they plan to do with the old armory building and surrounding properties in Oklahoma City.
 

The 72,000 square foot state-owned armory sits at NE 23rd Street and Walnut, just west of the Capitol building. The Journal Record’s Molly Fleming tells KGOU the armory was built in the 1930s and was used by the National Guard until 2010.

Laboratory manager Karim Saadeddine prepares a soil sample for testing at TerraCon Consultants, 4701 N. Stiles Ave. in Oklahoma City. TerraCon holds a summer jobs program for teachers.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Oklahoma’s education department is looking for companies to host teachers this summer.

Last year, a pilot program placed teachers with companies that hire people in science, math, engineering and technology, or STEM, related fields. The state is trying to expand the program this year.

Ted Kuschel and Brandon Birdwell at their second School of Rock site at 7200 N. May Ave. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

In some ways, a franchise is little bit like a business in a box, according to Journal Record reporter Molly Fleming. The concept has worked in other markets, so it already has a track record of some success.
 

“The branding is there. There's marketing power. And in some instances there's a team to help you get started,” Fleming said.

A drilling rig in northwestern Oklahoma's Mississippi Lime oil and gas play.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma oil and gas companies are examining how to take advantage of changes in corporate taxes.

President Donald Trump signed a GOP-backed bill to decrease the corporate tax rate from 35 to 21 percent in December.  Sarah Terry-Cobo writes in the Journal Record that there was a perception that the lower tax rate would result in stock buybacks, dividends and implicit payouts to corporate executives, according to University of Tulsa energy business professor Tom Seng.

This Jan. 31, 2018, photo shows shopping carts at a Costco in Homestead, Pa.
Gene J. Puskar / AP Photo

The second largest retail chain in the world is one step closer to bringing a store to Oklahoma City.

The Oklahoma City Economic Development Trust approved the beginning of negotiations Tuesday for a retail incentive agreement with Costco. 

Travelers have drinks at a bar inside Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Oklahoma’s new alcohol laws take effect in October, but how drinks will be taxed is still up in the air.

State Sen. Stephanie Bice, R-Oklahoma City, has filed legislation that would eliminate a 13.5 percent tax on full strength beer, wine  and drinks with spirits purchased at restaurants and bars, and replace it with a 6.5 percent alcohol tax at the distribution level.

The new Muscogee (Creek) Nation Community Hospital in Okemah.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Though gaming operations continue to be a large economic focus for Oklahoma’s tribes, they are continuing to reach out into other endeavors. These projects include healthcare, retail, manufacturing, agriculture and more.

Developer Marva Ellard on the campus of the former Villa Teresa School, 1216 Classen Dr. in Oklahoma City.
Emmy Verdin / Journal Record

The demand for owner-occupied residential housing in downtown Oklahoma City continues to grow, so developers are adding more housing to the area.

The Journal Record’s Molly Fleming told KGOU that those development include the Wheeler District south of the river, the former Villa Teresa school, 701 Hudson, The Bower and The Broadway Condominiums, among other projects.


thefixer / Flickr.com

At four rural libraries in Oklahoma, patrons are putting their names on a waiting list to get a hot commodity: a wireless hot spot.

A group of people take a tour of Bricktown via the canal.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

To know how to attract more visitors to Oklahoma City, the city needs to know what we don’t have.

The Greater Oklahoma City Convention and Visitors Bureau is circulating surveys to 800 people to find why people come, and to help identify tourism gaps.

Workers hammer spikes into place on a new rail spur south of Kingfisher.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

A Houston-based company is planning to invest up to $40 million in a rail spur and transportation loading center near Kingfisher.

Construction at the Oklahoma Capitol is being paid for by bonds sold by the state.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Oklahoma’s budget shortfall and “cautious optimism” from the oil and gas sector were two of the largest themes in business news during 2017.

Speaking on KGOU’s The Business Intelligence Rerport, Journal Record editor Ted Streuli said the state’s budget woes had implications in healthcare, transportation, employment and the state’s image.

Amos Kofa studies in the library at the University of Oklahoma School of Law in Norman.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

As the number of applications for law schools decline nationwide, some universities are considering a shakeup to their admittance process.

Fourteen universities now allow students to submit GRE scores, instead of the  LSAT. Among the schools that have made the switch are Harvard, Columbia, Northwestern and Texas A&M.

Nancy Parsons, CEO and president of CDR Assessment Group Inc., speaks at the 2020 Woman on Boards conference at Oklahoma City University’s Meinders School of Business.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Women comprise at least 20 percent of board members at only four publicly-traded corporations in Oklahoma. Those companies are Devon Energy Corp., OGE Energy Corp., Magellan Midstream Partners and Sonic Corp.

Gulfport Energy Corp. offices at 3001 Quail Springs Pkwy. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

One Oklahoma City-based driller’s credit line was recently increased, which could be a sign the business is doing well.

SandRidge Energy headquarters in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

In an effort to move forward with the purchase of a Colorado-based energy company, SandRidge Energy issued a so-called “poison pill” Monday to stave off efforts by an activist investor to block the deal.

Capt. Tony Riddles of the Norman Police Department, standing, watches as three volunteers from the audience tackle Sgt. Tim Smith, who acted as an armed gunman for an active shooter training workshop at Norman Regional Hospital on November 17, 2017.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

A consultant at a business that provides active shooter preparedness training says there is more demand for their service since July.

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