KGOU

Business Intelligence Report

Fridays at 6:44 a.m., 8:44 a.m., 12:35 p.m., and 5:44 p.m.

A weekly feature produced in partnership with the Journal Record, Oklahoma's weekday newspaper and website specializing in business, legislative and legal news. Editor Ted Streuli and Journal Record reporters discuss business and economic development in the state.

Ways to Connect

Tamiko Cabatic prepares blood samples for blood typing and screening at the Oklahoma Blood Institute in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

 

Oklahoma City’s biotech industry is budding, but politics, investment and education are hampering its growth.

The Journal Record’s Catherine Sweeney reports the industry attracts billions of dollars annually. However, some pieces of legislation have branded the state as “anti-research,” poor education funding limits the number of students who can work in STEM field, and investors are leery of the state.

cigarettes
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

 

Health care providers are lining up behind a proposal to increase Oklahoma’s sales tax on cigarettes by $1.50. The proposal is also attracting the supports of child advocacy groups.

A man paints a house on NW 15th Street in the Heritage Hills neighborhood of Oklahoma City Tuesday.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

If an Oklahoma homeowner wants to make some repairs on their own, they may be breaking the law. New bills in the state legislature would change that.

Sparq Natural Gas CEO Norman Herrera fills a pickup truck with compressed natural gas in front of the Oklahoma Environmental Management Authority office in El Reno Friday.
Mark Hancock / Journal Record

 

 

El Reno installed a compressed natural gas station for its refuse fleet. It’s part of a larger trend of municipalities relying on the fuel for its services.

The Journal Record’s Sarah Terry Cobo writes Oklahoma Environmental Management Authority owner David Griesel says the dispensers save time and money.

 

Moving to a rural Oklahoma town can be hard selling point for the state’s tribes, especially for high-demand, skilled professions like doctors and chefs.

The Journal Record newspaper released a special issue this week, Building Bridges, that looks at the tribal impact on Oklahoma’s economy. As part of the issue, reporter Catherine Sweeny noted that tribal healthcare facilities have to compete with metropolitan areas to attract doctors.

Emergency Department director Dr. Robin Mantooth and Chief Operating Officer John Manfredo lead a tour of the department at Norman Regional Health System’s new hospital building in Moore on January 17, 2017.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

One of Oklahoma’s health information exchanges will close. Coordinated Care Oklahoma announced on Monday that the non-profit organization plans to fold.

Health information exchanges let healthcare providers share and access records across hospitals. Journal Record reporter Sarah Terry Cobo writes that Coordinated Care  as in the process of merging with a competitor called MyHealth Access Network before making its sudden decision.

Sue Ogrocki / AP

Throughout 2016, the fallout continued from the downturn in energy prices that started more than two years ago. Commodity prices bottomed out at a 13-year-low earlier this year, but it’ll still be a long time before Oklahoma’s oil and gas sector fully recovers.

Several Oklahoma energy stories made national headlines earlier this year, from bankruptcies, stock exchange de-listings, and even the unexpected death of an industry godfather.

SandRidge Saga

Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett listens to a slideshow presentation on the city’s MAPS projects during a special session of the Oklahoma City Council Tuesday at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Earlier this week the Oklahoma City Council met for a special session at the Cox Convention Center in downtown Oklahoma City to discuss the general obligation bond to pay for city government that will go before voters in 2017.

The GE Global Research Center in Oklahoma City.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Over the next week City Council members will consider adding a new tax increment finance, or TIF, district to Oklahoma City.

Computer screen with heathcare.gov open.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Seven weeks from now Donald Trump will become the 45th president of the United States. One of his signature campaign promises involved repealing or changing the hallmark legislative achievement of his predecessor – the Affordable Care Act.

Overhauling or undoing such a complex healthcare law nationwide won’t be a simple task, according to The Journal Record’s editor-in-chief Ted Streuli.

Raul Font is president of the Latino Community Development Agency in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Immigration dominated the 2016 presidential election, with promises from President-elect Donald Trump to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico, and a clampdown on undocumented migrants from both Latin America and the Middle East.

Mass deportations could have a significant affect on Oklahoma City’s economy, especially south Oklahoma City, where there’s a significant Hispanic population.

The SandRidge Energy Inc. logo is seen on a vehicle parked at the company headquarters in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Over the past week or so Oklahoma City’s energy companies have been releasing their quarterly earnings reports, and some of the more interesting numbers came from SandRidge Energy. After the stock market closed Tuesday, the company reported a net loss of $404 million for the quarter.

Jim Calloway addresses the audience during an Oklahoma Bar Association conference on business skills at the Sheraton Oklahoma City Downtown Hotel on Wednesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

In today’s business climate, attorneys have to think more like a CEO who runs a company rather than someone who just practices law.

That’s according to Jim Calloway, who’s the head of the Oklahoma Bar Association’s Management Assistance Program.

A man enters the Skirvin Hilton Hotel in downtown Oklahoma City Tuesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

On Tuesday, the City of Oklahoma City announced hotel/motel tax collections fell for the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2017, and were down even below the most conservative estimates.

The so-called “tourist tax” was down 5.9 percent compared to FY 16, but 2.7 percent below estimates. The Journal Record’s editor Ted Streuli says the effect was felt city-wide, but the downturn really differs based on geography.

Lt. Gen. Lee K. Levy II speaks at the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber’s State of Aerospace luncheon Tuesday at the Embassy Suites Oklahoma City Downtown/Medical Center.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Earlier this week the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber held its annual State of Aerospace luncheon to update the business community on both the military and civilian sides of the industry.

Tinker Air Force Base wants to work with small businesses, but The Journal Record’s senior reporter and digital strategist Sarah Terry-Cobo says the federal government’s seven-year budget impasse means defense contractors suffer from a pay delay.

A road sign informs motorists of the closure of the intersection of Reno Avenue and E.K. Gaylord Boulevard in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

If you’ve been to downtown Oklahoma City in the past year, you’ve probably had to weave your way around concrete barriers, dodge traffic cones, and been yelled at by your GPS due to a significant amount of construction at the base of tall office buildings.

A lot of that is part of Oklahoma City’s Project 180, which grew out of tax increment financing that helped build Devon Tower.

The Smart Saver grocery store at NE 23rd Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

About two years ago the City of Oklahoma City granted tax increment finance, or TIF status to the Northeast 23rd Street, Martin Luther King, and Kelley Avenue corridors as part of a project it's calling the Northeast Renaissance.

An artist’s conception of a proposed hotel that would be attached to downtown Oklahoma City’s new convention center.
Provided / Omni Hotel and Resorts

Earlier this week, the Oklahoma City Council voted 7-2 to pursue negotiations with the developer Omni for a proposed hotel attached to downtown Oklahoma City’s new convention center that’s part of the MAPS 3 series of projects.

Shekeyra Goodman sets a table in an event room Tuesday at the Embassy Suites Oklahoma City Downtown/Medical Center.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

On Tuesday, the Oklahoma Hotel and Lodging Association held its annual forecasting luncheon at the Skirvin in downtown Oklahoma City. The group’s figures show hotel demand in the state dropped 3.5 percent, while the supply was up 2.9 percent.

One of the presenters, Jan Freitag, basically said this decline all has to do with the price of oil, and that the demand for hotel rooms used to grow by 8 percent annually.

The abandoned Lantana Apartments complex at 7408 NW 10th St. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The big news that came out of this week’s Oklahoma City Council meeting involved the body formally voicing its opposition to State Question 777 – the so-called “right-to-farm” proposal.

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