KGOU

Business Intelligence Report

Wednesdays

A weekly feature produced in partnership with the Journal Record, Oklahoma's weekday newspaper and website specializing in business, legislative and legal news. Editor Ted Streuli and Journal Record reporters discuss business and economic development in the state.

Ways to Connect

Workers construct Shift, an immersive art experience at Current Studio, 1218 N. Pennsylvania Ave. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

A new immersive art project could help drive business to a shopping area and create economic opportunities for Oklahoma City artists.

Factory Obscura, a collective of artists, created an installation called SHIFT at Current Studio at 1218 N. Pennsylvania Ave. The art installation encourages visitors to “physically explore the full-sensory environment,” according to  Current Studio’s website.

Workers at the construction site of West Village Apartments at Main Street and Fred Jones Avenue in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Commercial real estate sales could slow because buyers and sellers can’t seem to agree on prices.

Nurse practitioner Rachel Mack examines a patient at Family Health Care & Minor Emergency Clinic in Warr Acres.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

A change in federal law in 2014 made it more difficult for advanced practice registered nurses to provide pain relief for patients. The law effectively removed nurses’ ability to prescribe schedule 2 drugs, such as hydrocodone.

Oklahoma City Thunder guard Russell Westbrook (0) drives around New York Knicks guard Ron Baker (31) in the fourth quarter of an NBA basketball game in Oklahoma City, Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017. Oklahoma City won 105-84.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

As the Oklahoma City Thunder open a their tenth season, restaurants and vendors at Chesapeake Energy Arena are unveiling new food options.

Molly Fleming writes in the Journal Record that chef Andrew Murin completely revamped the menu at Budweiser Brewhouse. He now offer bruschetta, nachos with rotisserie chicken, salmon and desserts with Bedre chocolate.

A man practices his putting at Lincoln Park Golf Course in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Organizations that hold golf tournament fundraisers say they are still an effective way to raise money, even though fewer young people are golfing.

Construction of a Chickasaw Nation casino in Terral.
Courtesy photo / Journal Record

Leaders of some Oklahoma tribes see opportunities in a court ruling this summer that could potentially open up many questions about sovereignty and jurisdiction on tribal lands.

A planned development at the old Logan County hospital in Guthrie would be affected by a proposed end to the state’s Affordable Housing Tax Credit program.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

One bill filed during the special legislative session would end Oklahoma’s film rebate program, while another piece of legislation would eliminate the Oklahoma Affordable Housing Tax Credit.

Three women chat in front of business storefronts in downtown Perry. State legislators hosted an interim study on Wednesday to evaluate what’s hindering businesses from locating in rural Oklahoma.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Business recruiters in Oklahoma say they need more tools to help attract companies to the state.

At a House interim study on Wednesday, economic development leaders indicated Oklahoma is losing out to other states because Oklahoma does not have a robust closing fund to help seal deals. A closing fund is state-appropriated money that can be used at the last minute to entice a company to set up shop.

The former campus of Villa Teresa School at 1216 Classen Dr. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

An old Catholic school campus in downtown Oklahoma City has a new owner.

Marva Ellard and development partner Billy Woodring purchased the six-building Villa Teresa property this week for $5.5 million. They plan to redevelop it as a mixed-use property which could include a boutique hotel in the nuns’ convent and condominiums and townhouses on the rest of the area.

The oldest building on the Villa Teresa campus dates back to 1917, but it wasn’t until 1933 that the Carmelite Sisters opened the K-4 school. The school closed in 2012.

Businesses are surrounded by floodwaters from Harvey, in Humble, Texas.
David J. Phillip / AP

Oklahoma energy businesses who operate in Houston and the Texas and Louisiana coast have been affected by Hurricane Harvey’s massive flooding.

This week on The Business Intelligence Report, Journal Record senior reporter Sarah Terry-Cobo discusses the storm’s impact on Oklahoma's energy industry.

TRANSCRIPT

Participants of the USA Softball All-American Games tournament perform warm-up exercises on the field at USA Softball Hall of Fame Stadium in Oklahoma City. The stadium is also home to the NCAA Women’s College World Series.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

The NCAA turned down Oklahoma City as a host for eleven tournaments that will occur between 2019 and 2022.

Among the events that Oklahoma City tried to attract were the Division I and Division II wrestling championships.

Tim L. Brassfield, the executive director of the Oklahoma City All Sports Association, said the city lost out on the wrestling tournament because the Chesapeake Arena was too small, among other factors.

Molly Fleming writes in the Journal Record:

First National Center in Oklahoma City
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma City’s City Council agreed to invest $45 million in the vacant First National Center at Tuesday’s meeting.

Developers Gary Brooks and Charlie Nicholas purchased the building in January for $23 million. They plan to redevelop it as a mixed-use residential and commercial property, according to the Journal Record’s Brian Brus.

Gregg Hostetler, vice president of Infrastructure Engineers Inc. based in Edmond.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

New software will help engineers at the Oklahoma Department of Transformation determine which bridges require inspection after an earthquake.

Developer Sets Eyes On Downtown Oil Mill

Aug 3, 2017
An aerial view of traffic moving along Interstate 40 past the Producers Cooperative Oil Mill in downtown Oklahoma City.
Courtesy photo

A large, vacant property in downtown Oklahoma City could be demolished as soon as this winter, paving the way for new development.

The Producers Cooperative Oil Mill has filed paperwork to demolish the ten structures on the site. The co-op now operates in Altus.

The Journal Record’s Molly Fleming writes the property is listed at $65 million dollars, and broker Don Hayes is marketing the property.

Katelyn Holbrook, with Integrity Gaming, practices dealing cards to Rustin Martin, also with Integrity, at the Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association’s annual conference in Oklahoma City.
Mark Hancock / Journal Record

Oklahoma’s tribes will be in unfamiliar territory in January 2020: Gaming compacts between the tribes and the state could end at that time.

Unless, of course, they don’t.

A woman pulls a suitcase along NE 23rd Street near N. Spencer Road in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Oklahoma City residents’ life expectancies vary greatly across the city. Among all ZIP codes, the difference between the highest life expectancy and the lowest is 18 years.

According to the Oklahoma City-County Health Department’s new wellness report, residents in the  73131 ZIP code have a life expectancy of 82 years, while their neighbors in the next door 73141 ZIP code live for an average of less than 68 years - a similar expectancy as developing countries such as Cambodia and Iraq.

Oklahoma state capitol
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Billions of dollars in Oklahoma state funds are reserved for education, revolving funds and other costs.  Called "apportionments," these allotments are beyond the reach of legislators and can't be changed.

A couple rides a water scooter on Lake Thunderbird east of Norman.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

An internal audit at the Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department found fraudulent employee time cards, misappropriation of funds and failure to comply with the Fair Labor Standards Act.

A man walks past the old city jail property in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

The old Oklahoma City jail could be put to a new use.

Workers on a road construction project on E.K. Gaylord Boulevard in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Education proponents and other Oklahoma City residents spoke out against a MAPS sales tax and bond proposal at this week’s city council meeting. If approved by council on June 20, the public will vote on the $1.1 billion proposal in September.

The general obligation bond package, permanent quarter-cent sales tax and temporary three-quarters cent sales tax would be used for infrastructure improvements and emergency services. The sales taxes would be a continuation of the expiring MAPS 3 one percent sales tax.

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