KGOU

Business Intelligence Report

Fridays at 6:44 a.m., 8:44 a.m., 12:35 p.m., and 5:44 p.m.

A weekly feature produced in partnership with the Journal Record, Oklahoma's weekday newspaper and website specializing in business, legislative and legal news. Editor Ted Streuli and Journal Record reporters discuss business and economic development in the state.

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American Energy Partners, LP founder and CEO Aubrey McClendon, who co-founded Chesapeake Energy in 1989.
Provided / The Journal Record

One of the country’s major oil and natural gas producers, and a huge driver of Oklahoma City’s and the state’s economy, filed a lawsuit Tuesday alleging its founder and former CEO stole trade secrets during his final days at Chesapeake Energy Corporation.

Aubrey McClendon has been no stranger to the controversy. In 2012 the Chesapeake board of directors significantly curtailed his responsibility, before he eventually stepped down during the first half of 2013.

Gov. Mary Fallin delivers her 2015 State of the State address on Feb. 2, 2015.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin issued an executive order Monday imposing a moratorium on hiring and pay raises for state workers.

New state workers can still be hired as long as it’s approved in writing by the statewide elected official or cabinet secretary who manages the particular agency, and they have to explain why this is necessary.

Gov. Mary Fallin and U.S. Air Force officials attend the announcement of a deal that will provide more land for Tinker Air Force Base.
Kelly White / Tinker Take Off

On Wednesday Tinker Air Force Base announced it now owns 158 acres of land just west of the base to house the maintenance hub for the U.S. Air Force’s KC-46A Pegasus, which is designed to be the next-generation aerial refueling plane.

The land previously belonged to the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway Co., which used it as a yard to serve the General Motors assembly plant that closed nearly a decade ago.

The proposed Core to Shore tax increment financing district boundary.
The Journal Record

This week the Oklahoma City Council voted 8-1 to authorize Mayor Mick Cornett explore the idea of creating two new tax increment financing, or TIF, districts in downtown Oklahoma City.

These subsidies for redevelopment and community improvement projects embody the idea of “public-private partnerships” between cities and businesses.

Oklahoma City Councilman Ed Shadid cast the lone “no” vote.

Traffic passes in front of the Cox Convention Center in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Tuesday the Oklahoma City Council approved a request for proposals for a hotel catering to the convention center that will be built as part of the series of projects funded by the MAPS 3 temporary sales tax extension.

During the meeting, the council heavily stressed the importance of building enough parking for the hotel, convention center, and other uses around town, as well as alternate funding to make sure developers can complete the project.

Crew members service a Southwest Airlines jet at Tulsa International Airport.
Rip Stell / The Journal Record

Last week Tulsa International Airport unveiled a public relations campaign encouraging more travelers to fly out of northeast Oklahoma, and it’s already paying off.

Tulsans will soon have three more destinations to choose from after Allegiant Air announced Tuesday they’re adding nonstop year-round service from TIA to Las Vegas starting in April, and seasonal service to the Tampa Bay area and Los Angeles beginning in May and June, respectively.

Pedestrians walk in front of Cafe 7 at the First National Center in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Downtown Oklahoma City has been buzzing about the fate of First National Center.

The 84-year-old Art Deco skyscraper heavily inspired by the Empire State Building dominated the Oklahoma City horizon for four decades. But it’s had a rocky quarter century since its namesake bank folded in the mid-80s after the oil bust, and occupancy has been down since Devon Energy consolidated its operations in its flagship headquarters on Sheridan Ave.

Cory Moates, owner of Moates Excavating, left, and Tim Kent, environmental director of The Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma, inspect ongoing chat disposal from a site near Quapaw. The pit is the top of a collapsed mine near Picher.
Rip Stell / The Journal Record

Monday The Journal Record published its Tribal Economic Impact issue, a deep dive into how Oklahoma’s federally recognized Native American groups fund their services and contribute to Oklahoma’s economy.

With billboards pointing toward Oklahoma City and messages about booming careers and less traffic in Oklahoma City, Continental Resources is promoting itself in Houston. The energy company is making a connection, as revealed on online applications.
Continental Resources / The Journal Record

Oklahoma City made national headlines last week when a few stations on the south side started selling gasoline for less than $2 per gallon.

Friday morning West Texas Intermediate crude oil was trading below $60 per barrel, with Brent crude right around $63.

Joseph Hollowell and Drew Polk hold a Christmas tree in the tree shaker at Sorghum Mill Tree Farm in Edmond.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The weather is turning colder, and it’s been wet and dreary all week, so Oklahoma’s long-term drought doesn’t necessarily come to mind the way it does during the summer month.

We’ve discussed the effects of Oklahoma’s drought on the cattle ranching industry, but the ongoing climate event also impacts a different kind of agricultural worker – Christmas tree farmers.

George Rainy pushes an electrocardiogram machine through the emergency department at St. Anthony Hospital in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

It’s the time of year when a lot of people are thinking about health care. Many private employers’ option periods just wrapped up, and on November 15 annual enrollment opened for the Affordable Care Act.

A layout of the planned $50 million, 450,000-square-foot retail development at the intersection of NW 10th Street, N. Czech Hall Road, and Interstate 40 near Yukon.
Courtesy Rendering / The Journal Record

The Interstate 40 corridor in western Oklahoma City and Yukon is growing fast and some companies are looking at development prospects in the area.

The Journal Record's Molly Fleming reports GBT Realty Corp. plans to build a $50 million, 450,000-square-foot retail development on 80 acres at the intersection of NW 10th Street, N. Czech Hall Road, and Interstate 40 near Yukon.

Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Editor's note: The audio version of this story contains language that could be misleading. Written proposals from Clayco and Milhaus both discuss plans for a public-private partnership, and government incentives.

Downtown Oklahoma City is growing and there is need for more office, commercial and residential space. The Oklahoma City Urban Renewal Authority called a meeting this past Tuesday to talk about the empty lot at the southwest corner of Sheridan and Hudson avenues.

A worker repairs a sign above the Chevy Bricktown Events Center in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Reocrd

There's no shortage of large and small live music venues across Oklahoma.

In Oklahoma City, the owners of the Wormy Dog Saloon in Bricktown told The Journal Record's Molly Fleming they're partnering with a Colorado investor to open a 4,200-person venue sometime late next year. But some promoters are concerned.

Bryan Christiansen, manager of the Jet Center at Christiansen Aviation, says saving time and fewer distractions are two big advantages to private plane ownership.
Rip Stell / The Journal Record

Oklahoma has long been a regional hub of aviation, with three U.S. Air Force bases, Boeing’s facility in the Oklahoma City metro, and the University of Oklahoma’s aviation program operating out of Max Westheimer Airport in Norman.

There’s an image of corporate jet owners as evil, Gordon Gekko-type CEOs flying around the country on a whim. But many small and medium-sized businesses are finding it makes sense to invest in aircraft.

Oklahoma City skyline
Urbanative / Wikimedia Commons

On Tuesday the City Council of Oklahoma City met for a “rare joint workshop” meeting with the Oklahoma City Planning Commission.

They were looking over planokc - sort-of a guideline for growth over the 621 square mile community that’s one of the largest in the country based on geographic boundaries.

The recently opened Bleu Garten food truck park along NW 10th Street in Oklahoma City
Corbin Greer / KGOU

One side effect of Oklahoma City’s urban renewal has been a booming food truck industry.

The popular monthly H&8th festival closes out its seven month-long 2014 season October 31, and last month a permanent food truck park opened along NW 10th Street between the Midtown and Automobile Alley areas of Oklahoma City.

Cattle at the Oklahoma City Stockyards.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

On Wednesday Associate State Climatologist Gary McManus released figures showing it's been a dry September. Oklahoma only averaged 2.6 inches of rainfall, which is roughly 33 percent below normal.

A townhome at The Hill at Bricktown in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Over a seven-year period, the number of homes in downtown Oklahoma City will more than quadruple, and almost none of them will be for sale.

Oklahoma City Assistant City Planner Ian Colgan says 96 percent of the homes downtown are rentals - demonstrating a growing trend of lease properties, as opposed to traditional, single-family homes for sale.

American Indian Cultural Center & Museum

Time stretches on for the unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum near downtown Oklahoma City. The silvery struts jut up into the sky, the grass grows on the Cahokia-style mound and the river runs past the site, just north of the intersection of Interstates 40 and 35.

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