KGOU

Business Intelligence Report

Fridays at 6:44 a.m., 8:44 a.m., 12:35 p.m., and 5:44 p.m.

A weekly feature produced in partnership with the Journal Record, Oklahoma's weekday newspaper and website specializing in business, legislative and legal news. Editor Ted Streuli and Journal Record reporters discuss business and economic development in the state.

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Cory Moates, owner of Moates Excavating, left, and Tim Kent, environmental director of The Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma, inspect ongoing chat disposal from a site near Quapaw. The pit is the top of a collapsed mine near Picher.
Rip Stell / The Journal Record

Monday The Journal Record published its Tribal Economic Impact issue, a deep dive into how Oklahoma’s federally recognized Native American groups fund their services and contribute to Oklahoma’s economy.

With billboards pointing toward Oklahoma City and messages about booming careers and less traffic in Oklahoma City, Continental Resources is promoting itself in Houston. The energy company is making a connection, as revealed on online applications.
Continental Resources / The Journal Record

Oklahoma City made national headlines last week when a few stations on the south side started selling gasoline for less than $2 per gallon.

Friday morning West Texas Intermediate crude oil was trading below $60 per barrel, with Brent crude right around $63.

Joseph Hollowell and Drew Polk hold a Christmas tree in the tree shaker at Sorghum Mill Tree Farm in Edmond.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The weather is turning colder, and it’s been wet and dreary all week, so Oklahoma’s long-term drought doesn’t necessarily come to mind the way it does during the summer month.

We’ve discussed the effects of Oklahoma’s drought on the cattle ranching industry, but the ongoing climate event also impacts a different kind of agricultural worker – Christmas tree farmers.

George Rainy pushes an electrocardiogram machine through the emergency department at St. Anthony Hospital in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

It’s the time of year when a lot of people are thinking about health care. Many private employers’ option periods just wrapped up, and on November 15 annual enrollment opened for the Affordable Care Act.

A layout of the planned $50 million, 450,000-square-foot retail development at the intersection of NW 10th Street, N. Czech Hall Road, and Interstate 40 near Yukon.
Courtesy Rendering / The Journal Record

The Interstate 40 corridor in western Oklahoma City and Yukon is growing fast and some companies are looking at development prospects in the area.

The Journal Record's Molly Fleming reports GBT Realty Corp. plans to build a $50 million, 450,000-square-foot retail development on 80 acres at the intersection of NW 10th Street, N. Czech Hall Road, and Interstate 40 near Yukon.

Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Editor's note: The audio version of this story contains language that could be misleading. Written proposals from Clayco and Milhaus both discuss plans for a public-private partnership, and government incentives.

Downtown Oklahoma City is growing and there is need for more office, commercial and residential space. The Oklahoma City Urban Renewal Authority called a meeting this past Tuesday to talk about the empty lot at the southwest corner of Sheridan and Hudson avenues.

A worker repairs a sign above the Chevy Bricktown Events Center in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Reocrd

There's no shortage of large and small live music venues across Oklahoma.

In Oklahoma City, the owners of the Wormy Dog Saloon in Bricktown told The Journal Record's Molly Fleming they're partnering with a Colorado investor to open a 4,200-person venue sometime late next year. But some promoters are concerned.

Bryan Christiansen, manager of the Jet Center at Christiansen Aviation, says saving time and fewer distractions are two big advantages to private plane ownership.
Rip Stell / The Journal Record

Oklahoma has long been a regional hub of aviation, with three U.S. Air Force bases, Boeing’s facility in the Oklahoma City metro, and the University of Oklahoma’s aviation program operating out of Max Westheimer Airport in Norman.

There’s an image of corporate jet owners as evil, Gordon Gekko-type CEOs flying around the country on a whim. But many small and medium-sized businesses are finding it makes sense to invest in aircraft.

Oklahoma City skyline
Urbanative / Wikimedia Commons

On Tuesday the City Council of Oklahoma City met for a “rare joint workshop” meeting with the Oklahoma City Planning Commission.

They were looking over planokc - sort-of a guideline for growth over the 621 square mile community that’s one of the largest in the country based on geographic boundaries.

The recently opened Bleu Garten food truck park along NW 10th Street in Oklahoma City
Corbin Greer / KGOU

One side effect of Oklahoma City’s urban renewal has been a booming food truck industry.

The popular monthly H&8th festival closes out its seven month-long 2014 season October 31, and last month a permanent food truck park opened along NW 10th Street between the Midtown and Automobile Alley areas of Oklahoma City.

Cattle at the Oklahoma City Stockyards.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

On Wednesday Associate State Climatologist Gary McManus released figures showing it's been a dry September. Oklahoma only averaged 2.6 inches of rainfall, which is roughly 33 percent below normal.

A townhome at The Hill at Bricktown in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Over a seven-year period, the number of homes in downtown Oklahoma City will more than quadruple, and almost none of them will be for sale.

Oklahoma City Assistant City Planner Ian Colgan says 96 percent of the homes downtown are rentals - demonstrating a growing trend of lease properties, as opposed to traditional, single-family homes for sale.

American Indian Cultural Center & Museum

Time stretches on for the unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum near downtown Oklahoma City. The silvery struts jut up into the sky, the grass grows on the Cahokia-style mound and the river runs past the site, just north of the intersection of Interstates 40 and 35.

Remington Park Bets On New App

Sep 12, 2014
AveryO / Wikimedia Commons

With casino-goers graying, Remington Park racetrack and casino is playing the odds that a younger crowd will find betting on the races more interesting by using their smartphones, according to the Journal Record this week.

“Mobile wagering” allows casino patrons to bet on the horses from the comfort of their seat at the slot machine, at the Casino’s “Silks” restaurant, or anywhere else on the site—as long as it’s at the track. The app knows if the patron leaves the property.

Growth Is 'Goal' For Metro Soccer Programs

Sep 5, 2014
A member of the Rose State College Raiders women's soccer team goes in for the kick.
Kenneth Beachler / Rose State College

Rose State College recently established both men’s and women’s soccer teams, hoping to kick off new interest in their college.

Called the “Raiders,” named for daring, barn-storming World War II bomber pilots; the teams compete in Division I, Region II of the National Junior College Athletic Association. But they also hope to garner interest in the college in the hearts and minds of would-be students and their parents.

East And West, Health Care Expansion Spurs Growth

Aug 29, 2014
A new interchange has been proposed at Interstate 40 and Frisco Road in Yukon.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Where retail growth might have once sprung from a mall, progress now may be heralded by a health care facility, as shown in recent developments in both Yukon and Shawnee, according to the Journal Record newspaper.

Skulls Unlimited

An Unusual Oklahoma City Business Expands To Another State.

The Museum of Osteology signed a 15-year lease in a new entertainment district in Orlando, Florida.

The museum, which is on Sunnylane Road, grew out of a business called Skulls Unlimited. Jay Villemarette started the company in 1986. It sells more than 100 types of animal skulls and full skeletons through catalogs.

The new museum, called “Skeletons” will be near a Ferris wheel, a wax museum and an aquarium.

The Oklahoma Gas and Electric power plant in Muskogee.
Rip Stell / Journal Record

OG&E Says Cleaning Up Emissions At Its Coal-Fired Power Plants Could Cost $1 Billion.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sued the company in 2009, claiming pollution from OG&E creates smog in national parks.  The courts agreed and gave OG&E until 2019 to clean it up.

Karen Hickman, Oklahoma State University professor of natural resource ecology and management, displays what the leaflets of a healthy and growing kudzu plant look like.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

An Invasive Plant Threatens Oklahoma’s Agriculture Industry.

Kudzu is a vine known for taking over huge areas of states like Alabama and Mississippi. It can cover abandoned buildings and take down utility wires. It can grow 18 inches a day, and some experts joke that it grows so fast you have to be careful falling asleep near it.

The problem is that it also can kill off native species and can carry diseases that damage crops such as soybeans, which produces up to $130 million a year in Oklahoma.

Kudzu has been found in 50 places around Oklahoma.

Santi Kos, manager of Fashion Sport and Uniforms at 1300 NW 23rd St. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs, The Journal Record

Parents, Cities And Counties Plan For Back-To-School Tax Holiday.

August first through third, shoppers don’t have to pay sales tax on clothing items that cost less than $100. The holiday was implemented in 2007 to discourage shoppers from crossing state lines to save.

That’s good news for family budgets, but it also means the state misses out on $4 million it might have had otherwise.

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