KGOU

Business Intelligence Report

Wednesdays

A weekly feature produced in partnership with the Journal Record, Oklahoma's weekday newspaper and website specializing in business, legislative and legal news. Editor Ted Streuli and Journal Record reporters discuss business and economic development in the state.

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Two Lawsuits Are Challenging Bills That Were Signed Into Law By Governor Mary Fallin.

A group of parents, teachers and members of the state Board of Education are fighting the repeal of Common Core standards.

They say the bill violates the state Constitution by letting the Legislature take over an executive function.

The bill repeals the Common Core standards, which Fallin initially supported. It says new standards will be developed. Opponents say the language of the law gives the Legislature too much power to review the new guidelines.

USGS / www.earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes

Strong Earthquakes In Central Oklahoma Have Some Looking For Insurance That May Be Difficult To Get.

About 100 companies offer quake insurance in Oklahoma, the state insurance commissioner says. But most of them won’t start a policy until we have gone without a quake for 30 days.

Since November, there have been more than 265 events between magnitude 1 and 4.3 in Central Oklahoma.

Samuel Perry / Journal Record

An Energy Company Drilling A Well In Norman Changes How It’s Getting Water.

Finley Resources is putting in a well on Franklin Road in Norman. At first, the company ran a line directly to a fire hydrant. That led the city to raise the prices it charges high-volume commercial users. The more water someone uses, the more it costs per thousand gallons.

As Finley moves into the completion phase – including hydraulically fracturing the well – it has also run a line into nearby Little River Creek.

Matt Howry / Flickr Creative Commons

Two weeks ago, the Oklahoma City Council agreed to consider giving incentives to Cabela’s, an outdoor retailer.

Then, the company announced that it will build an 80,000-square-foot store in the new Chisholm Creek development. That project is coming together near the John Kilpatrick Turnpike and Western Avenue.

The city admitted that it was negotiating with the store before the announcement.

Dan Straughan, right, executive director of the Oklahoma City Homeless Alliance, fields questions after presenting the results of an annual survey of the city’s homeless population at United Way headquarters in Oklahoma City on Friday.
Samuel Perry/The Journal Record

The number of homeless people in Oklahoma City appears to be falling, but advocates say they could help more people find a place to live, if they had more workers to help.

A recent survey found about 1,400 homeless people in Oklahoma City. That’s about 380 people less than last year.

The Oklahoma City Homeless Alliance said that it has enough housing for 10 people each month. But it only has enough caseworkers to help two people a month manage the change.

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