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Here & Now

Weekdays 12 Noon - 2 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information, Here & Now is public radio’s daily digest of news and culture. Produced by WBUR in Boston.

More from the archives

Doctors are warning spectators not to look directly at the sun without protection during Monday’s eclipse. It can cause permanent damage like solar retinopathy or blindness, especially for people outside the path of totality.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Dr. Nhung H. Brandenburg, president of the Georgia Optometric Association, about how to view the eclipse safely.

Attacker Drives Van Into Barcelona Crowd

Aug 17, 2017

A white van jumped up onto a sidewalk and sped down a pedestrian zone Thursday in Barcelona’s historic Las Ramblas district, swerving from side to side as it plowed into tourists and residents.

NPR’s Camila Domonoske (@camilareads) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young with the latest.

With reporting from The Associated Press

How Did North Korea Get Nuclear Weapons?

Aug 17, 2017

In an interview with The American Prospect, White House strategist Steve Bannon said “there’s no military solution” to North Korea’s growing nuclear weapons program. Going against President Trump’s threat of “fire and fury,” Bannon suggested Trump should tone down the brinkmanship with North Korea and focus on China instead.

But how did North Korea get its nuclear weapons in the first place?

Fresh local corn is in season at farmers markets all over the country, and Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst has been taking advantage. She brings Here & Now‘s Robin Young and Meghna Chakrabarti cornbread made with fresh corn, scallops with tomato, corn and basil as well as a corn salad.

President Trump is placing blame for the violence at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville over the weekend on “both sides,” including counter-protesters. But what is true about what happened that day?

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Sarah Rankin (@sarah_rankin), a reporter for The Associated Press who was in Charlottesville that day.

The total solar eclipse next week might be the most studied disappearance of the sun ever, thanks in part to legions of citizen scientists. NASA, UC Berkeley and other institutions are recruiting volunteers to aid more than half a dozen different science experiments tied to the celestial happening.

Are you an “elder orphan?” Also called unbefriended adults, they are people aging alone, without kids.

But now, they have a Facebook group with about 5,000 users since it began last year. You have to be 55 or over, live without a spouse and not have children. Or, if you do, they have to either be estranged or live far away.

There have been five mass extinction events in the history of the Earth. In his book “The Ends of the World,” author Peter Brannen looks at what happened to cause these crises — from massive volcanic eruptions to asteroids — and tries to determine what our future might bring.

A new study in Kentucky is raising alarms about teens’ mental health in the state. The biannual Kentucky Incentives for Prevention survey found that 8.2 percent of Kentucky high school sophomores had attempted suicide in the past year. For sixth graders, that rate was 4.2 percent. The study found increases in every age group it looked at.

In a few weeks, teenagers will stumble bleary eyed and yawning into middle and high schools to beat that early morning bell. But in California, that could change by 2020. That’s if the state legislature passes a bill next month which would require all middle and high schools to open at 8:30 a.m. or later.

Viewing India's Partition Through Bollywood

Aug 14, 2017

Pakistan and India are marking 70 years since they won their independence from British rule in 1947. That’s when the countries were also partitioned into two — a bloody time that led millions to flee their homes and left as many as 1 million people dead.

The Treaty Of Versailles: An Uneasy Peace

Aug 14, 2017

The Treaty of Versailles was the most important agreement that came out of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference, which followed the end of World War I. A new book, “The Treaty Of Versailles: A Concise History,” looks at how that treaty was assembled and examines its mixed legacy.

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, permits thousands of young people to live and work in the U.S. legally.

The future of this immigration policy is uncertain under President Trump’s presidency, but two young entrepreneurs in Ohio want as many people as possible to apply. As Esther Honig (@estherhonig) from WOSU in Columbus reports, they’ve created software that makes the application fast and affordable.

In Seattle, where thousands of employees drive to work every day, parking can be a nightmare. But some companies and organizations — pushed by state and local government — are working to reduce the number of solo-car commutes by charging for parking by day, instead of on a monthly basis.

On Aug. 21, most North Americans will see at least a partial solar eclipse. But people in 12 states — in a 70-mile-wide swath from Oregon to South Carolina — will experience a total eclipse. The schedule is known with precision, but how do we know all this and when did we first know it?

Suspended Fox News host Eric Bolling has initiated a $50 million lawsuit against HuffPost reporter Yashar Ali, after Ali released a report last Friday claiming Bolling sent unwanted, inappropriate text messages to female colleagues at Fox News in the past.

North Korea is stepping up its rhetoric against the U.S. Early Wednesday morning, the North Korean military threatened on state-run television that the country is considering an attack on the U.S. territory of Guam, as a means to send a “serious warning signal to the U.S.”

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson responded to the threats during a stop in Guam. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson gets the latest from NPR’s Mary Louise Kelly (@NPRKelly).

Nearly five years after Superstorm Sandy, thousands of victims have returned to their homes on the New Jersey shore. For most of them it’s a cause for celebration. But for others it can be the start of a new nightmare: Some who received aid money to rebuild are being asked to pay it back.

Joe Hernandez (@byJoeHernandez) from Here & Now contributor WHYY reports.

Scientists from 13 federal agencies have drafted a report, leaked to several news organizations, which finds that temperatures in the U.S. are rising and human activity — especially greenhouse gas emissions — is “primarily responsible.” Some scientists have expressed concerns that the Trump administration will suppress the report, since Trump and members of his cabinet doubt the effect of human contribution to climate change.

Amazon and e-books have walloped brick-and-mortar bookstores across the country. But in the Washington, D.C., area, some shops appear to be bouncing back. At least five small, independent bookstores have opened locally in the last two years. And more are on the way.

Does all this activity mark a new chapter for neighborhood bookstores? Ally Schweitzer (@allyschweitzer) from Here & Now contributor WAMU talked to shop owners in D.C. to find out.

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