KGOU

Here & Now

Weekdays 12 Noon - 2 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information, Here & Now is public radio’s daily digest of news and culture. Produced by WBUR in Boston.

More from the archives

Some say a new housing crisis is developing. Rising prices mean home ownership is now nearly impossible for young families saddled with student debt.

It’s a problem in places like Seattle and Denver, where there are a lot of college graduates as well as the fastest growing home prices.

Ben Markus from Here & Now contributor Colorado Public Radio explains.

As presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump get ready for their first debate Monday night, Here & Now looks at some of the highlights in the history of presidential debates.

The first Clinton-Trump debate falls on the anniversary of the first-ever televised presidential debate, between Republican Richard Nixon and Democrat John F. Kennedy, on Sept. 26, 1960.

There’s just over a week left in Major League Baseball’s regular season. But only one team — the Chicago Cubs — has clinched a playoff berth.

That means the race for the postseason, both division winners and wild card hopefuls, is reaching a crescendo.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Here & Now sports analyst Mike Pesca about how the end of the season is shaping up.

How One Syrian Family Found A Home In Texas

Sep 21, 2016

Bassam Al Abbas does not like to think about the civil war raging in his home country of Syria.

The conflict, which produced nearly 5 million refugees and internally displaced millions more, also drove him and his family from their homes in 2012. For years they navigated foreign languages and vetting systems before eventually settling in Austin, Texas, in May.

“I cannot describe how much they welcomed me,” Al Abbas told Here & Now. “They made us love this country.”

A sculpture with a secret message at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia, has stumped amateur code breakers for a quarter-century.

Elonka Dunin, a software developer from Nashville, Tennessee, has spent the better part of two decades trying to unravel the mystery of Kryptos.

Tony Youngblood from Here & Now contributor Nashville Public Radio has her story.

The Washington Post reported Tuesday that Donald Trump spent more than $250,000 from his charitable foundation to settle lawsuits involving his businesses.

When the new National Museum of African American History and Culture opens this weekend in Washington, D.C., one of the exhibits will be a collection of photographs from the late 1930s to the 1940s, taken by a young African-American woman named Laura Fitzpatrick.

As NPR’s Elizabeth Blair reports, Fitzpatrick chose to capture images of life at its best.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac is the longest continually published periodical in American history. It turns 225 years old with the 2017 edition, which is on newsstands now.

It’s filled with the usual blend of advice, recipes and nuggets of knowledge that readers have come to expect over the years.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Janice Stillman, the almanac’s editor, about the milestone.

Interview Highlights: Janice Stillman

On farmer’s almanacs in general

A law enforcement official says the Afghan immigrant wanted in connection with explosions in New York City and New Jersey has been taken into custody following a shootout with police officers.

The official says two officers were shot in the encounter in Linden, New Jersey.

Authorities were looking for Ahmad Khan Rahami, a naturalized U.S. citizen from Afghanistan with an address in Elizabeth, New Jersey.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti gets the latest from NPR’s Hansi Lo Wang.

Guest

Historically, the working poor in America had very little leisure time while the upper class had plenty. Now, the opposite is true, at least for working class men.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Derek Thompson of The Atlantic about the surprising statistics, what working class men do with their leisure time and what might be the reasons behind their behavior.

Pages