Here & Now

Weekdays 12 Noon - 2 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information, Here & Now is public radio’s daily digest of news and culture. Produced by WBUR in Boston.

More from the archives

A potentially unprecedented conflict is unfolding in Pennsylvania’s state House of Representatives. After allegations of abuse, one Republican lawmaker has been granted a restraining order against another.

But WITF’s Katie Meyer reports the accused representative is still allowed in the state Capitol.

Ride-hailing companies like Uber and Lyft have had a noticeable effect on parking, especially at airports and stadiums.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Mary Smith, senior vice president at Walker Consultants, about the extent of the impact and what it means for the future.

United Airlines is apologizing after a dog died on one of its flights after an attendant reportedly forced the dog’s owner to keep the dog in an overhead bin for a flight.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with CNN’s Maggie Lake (@maggielake) about what happened.

Washington may soon become the first state to restrict a certain kind of chemicals found in products from food wrappers to fire-fighting foams. The chemicals are used because they’re non-stick and flame-resistant — but they’ve also been associated with liver problems, weakened immune systems and certain kinds of cancer.

EarthFix’s Eilís O’Neill (@eilis_oneill) reports.

How To Recognize And Overcome Your Biases

Mar 13, 2018

Almost every day, there’s at least one story in the news that involves racism, sexism or another kind of bigotry. But when you hear those stories, do you think, “Well, that’s not me”? Turns out, even among the best-intentioned people, unconscious biases can exist.

So how can we identify these biases, and is it possible to overcome them?

Sigrid Nuñez‘s new novel “The Friend” is about a lot of things — the suicide of a friend which will never be explained, the writing world and, at one point, sex trafficking. But most of all, it’s about a Harlequin Great Dane, white with black patches, named Apollo.

After her friend’s suicide, the book’s narrator — a cat person — is asked to take his massive pet in. They mourn together.

The Labor Department reported Friday that U.S. employers added 313,000 jobs in February, the most since July 2016. The unemployment rate remains at 4.1 percent.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with USA Today’s Charisse Jones (@charissejones).

A new MIT study shows false news travels six times faster on Twitter and reaches significantly more people than actual news.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young rounds up stories trending online with Femi Oke (@FemiOke) of Al Jazeera English, including one judge’s novel idea to resolve free-speech concerns over President Trump blocking some Twitter followers.

A deliberate act, that’s how Scotland Yard is describing the poisoning of a former Russian intelligence officer and his daughter in the southern English city of Salisbury on Sunday. Investigators will not say exactly what toxin was used, only that it was a nerve agent.

The Justice Department is suing the state of California for interfering with the Trump administration’s immigration policies.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Ben Bradford (@JBenBradford), state government reporter with Capital Public Radio.

A charity named in honor of Philando Castile says it has paid off the school lunch debt for hundreds of kids in Minnesota. Castile was killed by a police officer during a traffic stop in 2016.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd speaks with Pam Fergus, who started the charity, Philando Feeds the Children.

Interview Highlights

On starting the fund

There were several notable moments at the Oscars last night, including Frances McDormond’s call for an inclusion clause to promote the hiring of women and people of color.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young discusses the night’s storylines with Gene Demby (@GeeDee215) of NPR’s Code Switch.

The women’s basketball team at tiny Grace University in Omaha, Nebraska, has a winning season and qualified for a regional postseason tournament that begins on Wednesday.

But as Mike Tobias (@mtobiasnetnews) from NET Nebraska reports this season is about a lot more than wins and losses for the Royals.

Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School will gather later this month to call for gun measures after the shooting at their school that left 17 dead. It’s a political youth movement with echoes of the past, including the 1960s Berkeley protests and the 1903 Children’s Crusade.

More than 20 states allow community colleges to offer bachelor’s degrees, because forecasts show gaps between available jobs in the U.S. and the number of educated workers available to fill them.

StateImpact Ohio’s Ashton Marra (@AshtonMarra) looks at Ohio’s program, and how the state’s four-year institutions are responding.

The Trump administration is now looking at additional health care changes, and one of the strategies being put forward is removing restrictions on short-term health insurance.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti talks with NPR’s Alison Kodjak (@alikodjakNPR) about how that type of insurance works.

The Academy Awards are this weekend, and while the provocative, uncompromising German filmmaker Werner Herzog isn’t up for an Oscar, critics and cinephiles alike have long ranked him high among the living masters of cinema.

Before legendary French filmmaker François Truffaut died in 1984, he called Herzog “the most important film director alive.”

Put your phone down. Seriously, you can do it.

OK, we know it’s hard — these pocket supercomputers are tough to put away. There are biological reasons for that. But say you wanted to not check it 47 times a day, and actually do other things?

Science journalist Catherine Price, author of “How to Break Up with Your Phone,” has a few ideas.

Wednesday marks the end of Black History Month, and we have a story that begins at the end of the Civil War in 1865. Four million African-American slaves were emancipated. In the chaos following war, where would they go? How would they reunite with family?

David Freudberg of Humankind explores this history in his new documentary, “The Freed People.”

Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst has three nutritious and easy recipes using canned and dried beans, and brings them in for Here & Now‘s Robin Young to taste and share.

Beans 101: Cooking Tips And Nutrition

Beans are not only inexpensive, but also wildly versatile: You can use them in soups, stews, chilis, dips, tacos, enchiladas and more. They can be pureed, mashed, sauteed, stir-fried or baked.

And the bonus? Beans are very good for you.