Here & Now

Weekdays 12 Noon - 2 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information, Here & Now is public radio’s daily digest of news and culture. Produced by WBUR in Boston.

More from the archives

The 2005 video of an offensive and lewd conversation between Donald Trump and Access Hollywood’s then-host Billy Bush stirred outrage and several endorsement reversals.

It has also presented some tricky questions for NBC, which announced it is suspending Billy Bush from his current position as anchor on the “Today” show.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik about how the scandal is playing out for the media company and its staff.

U.S. employers added 156,000 jobs in September, less than expected, and unemployment rose to 5 percent, from 4.9 percent, according to today’s Labor Department report.

Jobs growth has averaged 178,000 a month so far this year, down from last year’s pace of 229,000.

But there was positive news in wages — the average hourly earnings increased 0.2 percent over August, and were up 2.6 percent over September 2015.

Hurricane Matthew lashed Haiti, leaving the country with damaged infrastructure and hundreds dead.

In addition to physical damage, the island now faces health risks, the displacement of thousands and a logistical nightmare as its people try to rebuild their lives.

The 1831 Southampton Insurrection, or Nat Turner’s Rebellion, is the subject of the new film “The Birth of a Nation.”

The film tells the story of Turner, an African-American born into slavery. He was taught to read and eventually became a preacher to fellow slaves. In August 1831 he led an uprising of slaves against their white oppressors. While some view Turner as a hero, others question his heroism because of the number of women and children who were victims of the deadly rebellion.


A segment that aired on “The O’Reilly Factor” this week is drawing criticism for the way it stereotyped Asian Americans.

Fox News Correspondent Jesse Watters went to Chinatown in New York City to ask people on the street their opinion of Donald Trump and China-U.S. relations. He starts out by asking two women if he is supposed to bow to say hello, and goes on to incorporate a number of other stereotypes about Asian Americans.

Who Is The New U.N. Secretary-General?

Oct 6, 2016

The United Nations Security Council today approved Portugal’s former prime minister Antonio Guterres as the next U.N. secretary-general, replacing Ban Ki Moon.

Guterres served 10 years as the U.N. high commissioner for refugees, a role he believes has prepared him to serves as secretary general.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Michael Doyle, a former U.N. assistant secretary-general, about Guterres and the role he will play on the world stage.

Here is the image mentioned in the segment:

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is calling the city council’s approval of his plan to revamp police oversight a big step forward.

The plan creates a new agency to investigate police shootings and misconduct, and includes a civilian board. This comes in the wake of outrage after the release of a video showing an officer fatally shooting African-American teenager Laquan McDonald.

Chip Mitchell of WBEZ reports.

The Benefits Of A Good, Long Yawn

Oct 5, 2016

A new study says that the size of a yawn can be used to predict to the size of one’s brain.

Researchers at the State University of New York at Oneonta studied 19 species, including humans, and found yawning to be a stimulant for brain growth.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson is joined by Sharon Begley, senior science writer for STAT news, for more on the study.

Looking for a new piece of art to display in your home? You could visit a local gallery. Or you could do what lots of galleries are doing these days: check out Instagram.

Hady Mawajdeh of KERA in Dallas takes a look at how the photo sharing app is seriously expanding the art world.

This year’s campaign ads might seem negative, but archivists at the Julian Kanter Political Commercial Archive at the University of Oklahoma say that’s nothing new.

The country’s largest archive of political ads includes more than 160,000 local, state and national campaign advertisements going back to 1936.

Tulsa Race Riots Of 1921 Echo Tensions Today

Oct 4, 2016

In 1921, the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, erupted in race riots that left up to 300 people dead. Homes and businesses were burned.

The riot has been mostly ignored by history. But a recent fatal police shooting of an African-American man in Tulsa has re-focused attention on the city’s past.

Bruce Fisher, retired curator of the African-American projects at the Oklahoma Historical Society, and Kate Carlton Greer, a reporter for KGOU, join Here & Now‘s Robin Young to discuss Tulsa’s past and present.

Another earthquake shook Oklahoma today. It measured 3.1 on the Richter scale, and struck just after 7 a.m. near Stroud, 65 miles from Oklahoma City.

That’s one of more than 500 this year, compared to California’s 156. Scientists have linked Oklahoma’s sharp increase in earthquakes in recent years to the underground injection of wastewater during oil and gas production.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young checks in with Joe Wertz, KGOU’s StateImpact reporter, about Oklahoma’s earthquake trends.

The restaurant scene in Washington is booming — it was even named Restaurant City of the Year by Bon Appetit magazine. That success is thanks, in part, to Spanish-born chef and owner Jose Andres, who runs a number of restaurants in the city and across the country.

From its state legislature and governor to its congressional delegation, Oklahoma is a solidly Republican state. So while polls and political analysts predict a Trump victory, several key ballot questions are causing a stir.

One of them, called “Right to Farm,” limits government restrictions on farming. Another focuses on alcohol sales.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young checks in with StateImpact Oklahoma reporter Logan Layden for the latest in Oklahoma politics.

Supporters of Donald Trump have been defending the Republican presidential nominee, saying that Trump’s business genius was revealed by a New York Times story this weekend that found that Trump may have avoided paying federal income taxes for 18 years.

Journalist and author David Cay Johnston joins Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti to discuss his reporting today, which took a closer look at Trump’s taxes.