Here & Now

Weekdays 12 Noon - 2 p.m.
Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information, Here & Now is public radio’s daily digest of news and culture. Produced by WBUR in Boston.

More from the archives

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
51828ad7e1c89124f3970a44|51828ad1e1c89124f3970a29

Pages

NPR Story
2:53 pm
Wed September 17, 2014

Playwright Israel Horovitz Turns Filmmaker

Kevin Kline and Maggie Smith in a scene from the film "My Old Lady"(Cohen Media Group)

Israel Horovitz has written over 70 plays. He’s had some 50 of them produced in France, which bestowed on him its Commander of the Order of Arts and Letters.

Now he’s directed his first feature film, “My Old Lady” based on his 2002 play. “My Old Lady” tells the story of Mathias, played by Kevin Kline, a down on his luck New Yorker who inherits an apartment in Paris from his father.

Read more
NPR Story
2:53 pm
Wed September 17, 2014

NASA Picks Companies To Launch US Astronauts Back Into Space

Members of a panel announce NASA's choice of Boeing and SpaceX to ferry astronauts to the International Space Station during a news conference at the Kennedy Space Center on Sept. 16, 2014, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. (John Raoux/AP)

 

NASA said it will give more than $6 billion to private space companies that will launch Americans into orbit.

Since the demise of the shuttle program in 2011, the United States has had to buy seats on Russian vehicles to get crew members to the International Space Station.

NASA announced this week that Boeing and SpaceX would have their own space vehicles ready to launch in 2017.

Read more
Food
2:38 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Kathy Gunst Explores Community Supported Agriculture

Peppers at the Red Fire Farm CSA pickup in Boston, Mass. (Kathy Gunst/Here & Now)

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 1:39 pm

Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) has become hugely popular in the food world as a way to eat local. Consumers pay farmers in advance, and in return receive “shares” or boxes, usually of produce that that farmer has harvested.

Read more
NPR Story
1:39 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Trump Plaza Hotel And Casino Closes Its Doors

Ruth Hardrick, a dealer who worked at Trump Plaza Hotel & Casino for 26 years, stands with friend, Anthony Powell, on The Boardwalk, as she answers a question after the casino closed early Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014, in Atlantic City, N.J. Trump Plaza is the fourth Atlantic City casino to go belly-up so far this year. (Mel Evans/AP)

After 30 years in business Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City, New Jersey is closing its doors.

This is the fourth hotel in the coastal gambling destination to close this year. Has Atlantic City lost its luster?

Vince Mazzeo, state assemblyman representing New Jersey’s 2nd Legislative District speaks with Herw & Nows Jeremy Hobson about the casino closures.

Read more
NPR Story
1:39 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Detroit's Post-Bankruptcy Blues

Monument to Joe Louis in downtown Detroit. (memories_by_mike/Flickr)

Detroit is one step closer to ending its bankruptcy ordeal after it reached a settlement with one of its remaining creditors.

Syncora Guarantee Inc. has withdrawn its objections to the city’s restructuring plan in return for a deal worth a fraction of the $200 million the company said it was owed.

Still, when Detroit does emerge from bankruptcy it doesn’t mean its revenue problems will be over.

Read more
Here & Now
1:39 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Sheriff Defends Use Of Military Equipment

The images of combat vehicles rolling in to confront demonstrators in Ferguson, Missouri, after the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown, provoked national debate over police departments receiving military equipment.

Since 2006, the Pentagon’s Excess Property Program has supplied police departments with almost 80,000 assault rifles, more than 600 armored vehicles, and hundreds of millions of dollars-worth of other equipment.

Read more
NPR Story
2:29 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Baja Coast Gets Pummeled By Hurricane Odile

Winds blow palm trees on the beach in Los Cabos, Mexico, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. (Victor R. Caivano/AP)

Residents and tourists hunkered down in shelters and hotel conference rooms overnight as a powerful and sprawling Hurricane Odile made landfall on the southern Baja California peninsula.

The area is home to gleaming megaresorts, tiny fishing communities and low-lying neighborhoods of flimsy homes. Forecasters predicted a dangerous storm surge with large waves as well as drenching rains capable of causing landslides and flash floods.

Read more
NPR Story
2:29 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

HBO's New Documentary Captures Terror On Film

It seemed like just a normal, busy shopping day on September 21, 2013 at the West Gate Mall in Nairobi, Kenya.

Everything suddenly changed when four men from the terrorist group Al Shabab attacked the mall with high-powered weapons. The attack went on for hours and more than 60 people were killed. Nearly all of the carnage was captured on security cameras.

Read more
NPR Story
2:29 pm
Mon September 15, 2014

Frustration Over Fracking Could Play Role In November Elections

Anti-fracking activist Kaye Fissinger gestures out to a reservoir near her community of Longmont where oil and gas companies are looking to drill.(Brian Gill/Inside Energy)

Communities in Colorado have been engaged in a political fight with the state to get more local control over oil and gas drilling.

It's a battle many thought was heading to the ballot box this November, until a last minute compromise stopped the initiative in its tracks.

Colorado’s governor John Hickenlooper declared the compromise a victory, but that left some members of the state’s environmental community furious and vowing payback on election day.

Read more
NPR Story
2:45 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

'We Expect You Back': A Friend's Poem For James Foley

Daniel Johnson (R) and his friend James Foley at a friend's wedding in Sept. 2001. Foley was captured and killed by Islamic militants in Syria. (Courtesy Daniel Johnson)

Poet Daniel Johnson has long tackled difficult subjects.

But his recently published poem “In the Absence of Sparrows” took on a much more personal note.

It’s a poem he penned for and about his friend James Foley, who was killed in Syria by Islamic militants, where he was working as a freelance reporter.

“I turned to poetry as a way to speak to him directly,” Johnson told Here & Now’s Robin Young.

Read more

Pages