Here & Now

Weekdays 12 Noon - 2 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information, Here & Now is public radio’s daily digest of news and culture. Produced by WBUR in Boston.

More from the archives

Looking for a new piece of art to display in your home? You could visit a local gallery. Or you could do what lots of galleries are doing these days: check out Instagram.

Hady Mawajdeh of KERA in Dallas takes a look at how the photo sharing app is seriously expanding the art world.

This year’s campaign ads might seem negative, but archivists at the Julian Kanter Political Commercial Archive at the University of Oklahoma say that’s nothing new.

The country’s largest archive of political ads includes more than 160,000 local, state and national campaign advertisements going back to 1936.

Tulsa Race Riots Of 1921 Echo Tensions Today

Oct 4, 2016

In 1921, the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, erupted in race riots that left up to 300 people dead. Homes and businesses were burned.

The riot has been mostly ignored by history. But a recent fatal police shooting of an African-American man in Tulsa has re-focused attention on the city’s past.

Bruce Fisher, retired curator of the African-American projects at the Oklahoma Historical Society, and Kate Carlton Greer, a reporter for KGOU, join Here & Now‘s Robin Young to discuss Tulsa’s past and present.

Another earthquake shook Oklahoma today. It measured 3.1 on the Richter scale, and struck just after 7 a.m. near Stroud, 65 miles from Oklahoma City.

That’s one of more than 500 this year, compared to California’s 156. Scientists have linked Oklahoma’s sharp increase in earthquakes in recent years to the underground injection of wastewater during oil and gas production.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young checks in with Joe Wertz, KGOU’s StateImpact reporter, about Oklahoma’s earthquake trends.

The restaurant scene in Washington is booming — it was even named Restaurant City of the Year by Bon Appetit magazine. That success is thanks, in part, to Spanish-born chef and owner Jose Andres, who runs a number of restaurants in the city and across the country.

From its state legislature and governor to its congressional delegation, Oklahoma is a solidly Republican state. So while polls and political analysts predict a Trump victory, several key ballot questions are causing a stir.

One of them, called “Right to Farm,” limits government restrictions on farming. Another focuses on alcohol sales.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young checks in with StateImpact Oklahoma reporter Logan Layden for the latest in Oklahoma politics.

Supporters of Donald Trump have been defending the Republican presidential nominee, saying that Trump’s business genius was revealed by a New York Times story this weekend that found that Trump may have avoided paying federal income taxes for 18 years.

Journalist and author David Cay Johnston joins Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti to discuss his reporting today, which took a closer look at Trump’s taxes.

Uber is expanding its food delivery service, UberEats, planning to expand to at least 22 more countries in the next few months.

The delivery service launched in London and a few U.S. cities in the spring and summer, and this week began operating in Amsterdam, Dubai, Johannesburg and Tokyo. UberEats plans to be up and running in Stockholm, Jakarta, Bangkok and other cities within months.

Ash Vs. Evil Dead,” the television spin-off of the cult classic 1980s films, makes its return to Starz for season two on Sunday.

Bruce Campbell plays Ash Williams, a comical-yet-flawed character who returns to his hometown to fight evil. The series includes violent scenes that have no shortage of blood and gore for viewers, but how far is too far?

NPR’s Eric Deggans joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss the series’s return.

The United States owes African Americans reparations for its history of “racial terrorism,” according to a new report from a United Nations working group based in Geneva.

The team was invited by the U.S. government to conduct a fact-finding mission that explored the many ways in which racial discrimination has taken form, including police violence, mass incarceration and housing segregation; it also looks back in detail at slavery and the brutal practice of lynching.

This summer one of the largest birds in North America suddenly showed up in Washington state’s Puget Sound.

Squadrons of white pelicans have set area birders atwitter. They’re trying to figure out where the birds came from and what their arrival means.

While this rare sighting has been fun for bird watchers, Katie Campbell from Here & Now contributor Earthfix reports on why it may not be a good thing for the pelicans.

The newest Doritos have little flavor, no flashy color, minimal crunch and dull gray packaging. The kind of snack, essentially, that no one would choose.

And that, according to executives at Frito-Lay, is exactly the point.

The new chips are part of a campaign with Rock the Vote to boost voter registration among college students. Special vending machines placed on college campuses will be asking snackers whether they’ve registered to vote.

John and Heidi Small were told that it was a bad idea to start an all-’80s radio station.

But six years ago, the husband-wife team went ahead with their plan.

They run Sunny Radio in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and they speak with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson about some of their favorite songs.

For more than a century, the designers of tall buildings have used mostly concrete and steel. But advances in structural engineering have sparked new interest among architects in one of the world’s oldest building materials: wood.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Michael Green, a Vancouver-based architect who says wood is just as strong as concrete or steel — and more sustainable.

Robert Finley is not your average new artist.

At 63, the north Louisiana blues and soul musician has already lived a lifetime. He served as a helicopter serviceman in the Army in the ’70s and worked as a carpenter for decades until he started to lose his sight a few years ago.

Unable to continue working, Finley fell back on his dream: singing and playing guitar.