Here & Now

Weekdays 12 Noon - 2 p.m.
Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information, Here & Now is public radio’s daily digest of news and culture. Produced by WBUR in Boston.

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NPR Story
1:43 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Malcolm Gladwell Wrestles With David And Goliath Stories

Author Malcolm Gladwell is known for taking an alternate tack to conventional thinking, in books like “The Tipping Point” and “Outliers.”

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NPR Story
1:43 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Street Art Meets Ballet In Miami

Heatscape by Justin Peck.

At the Miami City Ballet tonight, the dancers are sharing the stage with a backdrop that includes the face of wrestler Andre the Giant.

That’s what happens when one of the country’s most sought-after choreographers teams up with one the country’s most famous street artists.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Alicia Zuckerman of WLRN reports.

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NPR Story
1:43 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Deadly Fashion: Norwegian Bloggers Experience Life In A Sweatshop

In the show “Sweatshop,” several Norwegian fashion bloggers flew to Cambodia, where they lived and worked in the clothing industry.

The three fashionistas – Frida, Ludwig and Anniken – not only saw, but experienced the hardships of Cambodian clothing workers, including low pay, terrible working conditions and sleeping on a cold, hard floor.

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Recipes
12:36 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Tips And 5 Recipes For Cooking With Kids

Teaching kids how to cook with vegetables is a great way to help them learn how to eat a healthy diet. (Jessica Lucia/Flickr Creative Commons)

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 1:43 pm

Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst joins host Jeremy Hobson with five tips for cooking with young children. She also shares these five kid-friendly recipes:

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NPR Story
1:20 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

As Price Of Oil Falls, Drilling Rigs In Colorado Feel The Pinch

A disassembled rig sits in a field east of Greeley, Colo. (Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio)

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 11:25 am

Half of Colorado’s drill rigs have gone idle since the end of October. The decline in the oil economy’s growth here is directly tied to the low price of oil. Economic experts aren’t sure where prices are headed, and that translates into economic uncertainty and layoffs. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Grace Hood of Colorado Public Radio reports.

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NPR Story
1:20 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

'Forget It, Jake, It's Chinatown': California's Historic Drought Has Cinematic Feel

Jack Nicholson portrays a private investigator in Los Angeles in the 1930's, endangered when a seemingly routine case uncovers the private scandals of the city's leading family, in "Chinatown." 1974 photo. (CBS Television Network via AP)

The photos and stories of California’s historic drought seem cinematic because they are. The 1974 film “Chinatown” involves a fictional Los Angeles mayor making the case for building an aqueduct to bring water from farm areas to Los Angeles, to supply water for people to move to the city.

Kevin Starr, history professor at the University of Southern California, says comparing the present-day drought to the California of “Chinatown” is especially apt.

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NPR Story
1:20 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

7 Out Of 10 Americans Worried About Finances

(TradingAcademy.com/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu April 9, 2015 9:23 pm

New surveys out this month suggest Americans still don't understand the value of saving. Millennials are not saving, primarily because of student debt and low wages.

But it's not just young people. The National Foundation for Credit Counseling released a survey showing seven in 10 Americans still say they are consistently worried about their finances.

There is evidence that Americans have gotten better at managing credit card debt, but bottom line, the survey finds people are not getting their finances in good order.

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NPR Story
2:32 pm
Wed April 8, 2015

Tsarnaev Convicted On All Charges In Marathon Bombing

A jury has convicted Dzhokhar Tsarnaev of all 30 counts he faced stemming from the 2013 bombing of the Boston Marathon.

Tsarnaev was found guilty Wednesday on charges that included conspiracy and use of a weapon of mass destruction. Of the 30 charges, 17 are punishable by death.

Tsarnaev’s lawyers admitted he participated in the bombings, but said his now-dead older brother was the driving force behind the deadly attack.

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NPR Story
2:32 pm
Wed April 8, 2015

Police Chief 'Sickened' By S.C. Shooting Video

Anthony Scott holds a photo of himself, center, and his brothers Walter Scott, left, and Rodney Scott, right, as he talks about his brother at his home near North Charleston, S.C., Wednesday, April 8, 2015. Walter Scott was killed by a North Charleston police officer after a traffic stop on Saturday. The officer, Michael Thomas Slager, has been charged with murder. (Chuck Burton/AP)

A white South Carolina police officer who claimed he killed a black man in self-defense has been fired and faces murder charges after a bystander’s video recorded him firing eight shots at the man’s back as he ran away. The city’s mayor also said he’s ordered body cameras to be worn by every single officer on the force.

The officer, Michael Thomas Slager, has been fired, but the town will continue to pay for his health insurance because his wife is eight months pregnant, said North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey, who called it a tragedy for two families.

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NPR Story
2:32 pm
Wed April 8, 2015

A New Kind Of Nuclear Reactor?

Steam billows from the cooling towers at Exelon's nuclear power generating station February 17, 2006 in Byron, Illinois. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Nuclear energy is fraught. What do you do with the spent radioactive fuel rods? What happens if there’s a meltdown? These worries have led many to write the whole thing off, and some to rebel against it. But a startup in Cambridge, Mass., thinks things can be different – like, revolutionary different. Ari Daniel, with Here & Now’s tech partner IEEE Spectrum, has our story.

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