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Here & Now

Weekdays 12 Noon - 2 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information, Here & Now is public radio’s daily digest of news and culture. Produced by WBUR in Boston.

More from the archives

Coptic Christians Targeted Again In Egypt

May 26, 2017

More than 20 people were killed Friday when gunmen opened fire on a bus carrying Coptic Christians to a monastery in Egypt. There have been a number of recent attacks claimed by ISIS on Coptic Christians in the country.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson gets the latest from NPR’s Jane Arraf (@janearraf) in Cairo.

In Manchester, England, police have arrested eight people in connection with Monday night’s bombing at Manchester Arena. The investigation has also extended to Libya.

The bomber, Salman Abedi, spent three weeks there, and returned just days before the attack. Abedi’s father and brother have also been detained by Libyan authorities.

Leon Panetta, who served as director of the CIA and defense secretary under former President Obama, joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the Manchester bombing and national security issues during President Trump’s time in office.

Panetta is currently chairman of the Panetta Institute for Public Policy.

Imagine life without credit cards. If you couldn’t borrow money to finance a big purchase, how would you do it?

There’s growing evidence many people in the developing world are turning to gambling. Sonia Paul (@sonipaul) with 60db reports from Kampala, Uganda.

Air pollution may be disrupting your sleep, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Washington. Air pollution can cause a number of acute and chronic health problems, and even though some cities are making efforts improve air quality, it’s getting worse in many places around the world.

Moody’s Investors Services cut China’s credit rating for the first time since 1989 this week, changing its outlook from stable to negative.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with CNN’s Maggie Lake (@maggielake) about what’s behind the decision.

The Islamic State group has claimed responsibility for Monday night’s attack at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England. ISIS made the claim via one of its official news outlets, but it’s not yet clear how credible the claim is.

Disney Bets On 'Avatar' Theme Park

May 23, 2017

Eight years after “Avatar” came out, Disney is hoping the film’s success will translate to a new theme park. Pandora — The World of Avatar opens later this week near Orlando, Florida.

President Trump arrives in Rome on Tuesday after visiting Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas in Bethlehem, where Trump discussed countering terrorism and brokering peace.

NPR’s Daniel Estrin (@DanielEstrin) joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to review Trump’s stop in Israel.

How Slack Has Changed The Workplace

May 22, 2017

The messaging app Slack describes itself as “team communication for the 21st century.” It lets people communicate online instantly in the office, individually or in teams. The company was valued at $3.8 billion in 2016 and says it has 5 million daily users.

President Trump's push to repeal the Affordable Care Act, crack down on illegal immigration and impose a ban on people trying to enter the U.S. from certain Muslim majority countries has many worried.

Suicide rates in the U.S. are at their highest in 30 years. In 2014, the last year for which there are official government figures, nearly 43,000 Americans killed themselves. That’s nearly four times as many as were shot to death by others.

The rise in suicide comes despite intensive prevention efforts by mental health professionals, citizen-volunteers, people affected by suicide, teachers, religious leaders and others.

Could the key to prevention be identifying people about to make an attempt?

Lisa Ko‘s debut novel “The Leavers” tells the story of Deming Guo, whose mother Polly, an immigrant from China living in the U.S. illegally, disappears when he’s 11 years old.

Guo is eventually adopted by a well-to-do white couple, but struggles with their expectations that he fit into their world.

The Washington Post reports this week that a federal program offering loan forgiveness for students working in the public or non-profit sectors may be on the chopping block in the soon-to-be-released Trump administration budget.

A jury on Wednesday acquitted a white police officer in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man who had his hands up. Many of the jurors and the family of Terence Crutcher were in tears as the not-guilty verdict was read for Tulsa police officer Betty Jo Shelby.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Samantha Vicent (@samanthavicent), courthouse reporter for The Tulsa World.

In the next month, New York state lawmakers are expected to vote on a bill that allows police to check a driver’s cellphone with a “textalyzer,” which can tell whether a driver swiped or tapped the phone in the run-up to a crash.

The global cyberattack known as WannaCry is on the wane Tuesday, having held data hostage on hundreds of thousands of computers in more than 100 countries since Friday.

Cybersecurity experts and intelligence agencies say the attack bears similarities to past attacks carried out by North Korea. Meanwhile, SpaceX launched one of its heaviest payloads yet: a 6-ton satellite from the British company Inmarsat.

Scientists at the University of Vermont are engineering trees to look and act like old-growth forests. There is less than 1 percent of old-growth forest in the northeastern U.S. The forests are essential for providing habitat for animals and plants, mitigating flooding and absorbing carbon emissions.

The ride-hailing app Lyft is getting together with Waymo, which is part of Google’s parent company, to develop self-driving car technology.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Derek Thompson (@DKThomp), senior editor for The Atlantic, about what the move means for autonomous vehicles, and for Lyft’s competitor, Uber.

The Global Positioning System or GPS is now crucial to much more than just the maps we use on our phones.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson revisits a conversation with author Greg Milner (@GIMilner) about how the technology started in the military, and is now used in much of what we do each day — from agriculture to infrastructure.

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