Here & Now

Weekdays 12 Noon - 2 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information, Here & Now is public radio’s daily digest of news and culture. Produced by WBUR in Boston.

More from the archives

What Happens If Workers Become Obsolete?

Jun 29, 2015

The rapid rise in technology and machines has some experts predicting that workers could become obsolete. As Derek Thompson writes in a cover article for The Atlantic, futurists have often looked at this in a positive way — with people having more free time for leisure.

But there are of course questions of what it would mean economically, and also culturally. Thompson writes that it would bring about a great social and cultural transformation.

President Obama won a series of huge victories in the Supreme Court last week, including health care and same sex marriage. And officials in South Carolina called for the removal of the Confederate flag from the state capitol grounds after nine African Americans were gunned down in a Charleston church. Here & Now’s Robin Young asks historian Julian Zelizer to put the week into historical context.

To Be Young And Greek In A Time Of Crisis

Jun 29, 2015

In Greece, a breakdown in negotiations between the Greek government and its creditors has put Greece on the verge of default and an exit from the eurozone.

Greek banks were closed after a flood of fear-driven withdrawals, and they won’t open until next week. Greek citizens are being asked to decide the fate of the country in a referendum Friday on the economic terms that creditors are asking for in exchange for fresh aid.

President Barack Obama has delivered a rousing eulogy for Rev. Clementa Pinckney, who was among nine who were slain at an African-American church in South Carolina last week.

“The nation shares in your grief,” Obama said Friday at the funeral for Pinckney, 41, who was shot and killed during a Bible study at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church. Eight others also died.

“What a good man,” Obama said. “What an example he set.”

When Denton, Texas, voted to ban fracking in the town last year, the state’s oil and gas industry jumped into high gear. The day after the vote, the industry and the state filed lawsuits against Denton. The Texas legislature also passed legislation that stops local governments from regulating most drilling. From Here & Now contributing station KUT, Mose Buchele explains how this “ban on the ban” came about and why Denton just overturned its fracking ban.

On his final day broadcasting from Texas, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson sits down with San Antonio Mayor Ivy Taylor, who took the oath of office this week.

He asks her about San Antonio’s rapid growth, housing prices, a controversy over an anti-discrimination ordinance that protects members of the LGBT community, and the recent departure of the ride-sharing services Uber and Lyft from San Antonio.

Fourteen states must lift their bans on same-sex marriage, after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that same-sex couples have the right to marry anywhere in the United States. One of the states that must lift its ban is Kentucky. Joseph Lord of Here & Now contributing station WFPL in Louisville joins host Jeremy Hobson with details.

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled to extend the right to marry to same-sex couples in all 50 states. Among those who oppose the ruling is Jim Campbell, senior counsel for the Alliance Defending Freedom. He speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

In Texas, there is a debate over textbooks. Last November, the Republican-controlled State Board of Education voted to adopt new textbooks that will hit classrooms for more than 5 million public school students this fall.

The textbooks will contain information that is challenged by academics and that critics say is making education in Texas far too political. It all started back in 2010, when the board voted to adopt new standards for textbook manufacturers to follow.

Texas Wind Power Subsidies In Jeopardy

Jun 25, 2015

Texas leads the United States in the production of wind power, largely in thanks to a state mandate that utilities source a certain amount of electricity from renewables.

Wind power provides 10 percent of the Lone Star State’s energy. The industry uses a combination of private investment for production and government subsidies for transmission lines.

But there’s a movement to repeal state subsidies for wind power. Reporter Lorne Matalon of Marfa Public Radio reports.

Pages