Indian Times

News and interviews from Indian Country.

Oklahoma has one of the largest Native American populations in the United States. By using their right to govern themselves, some of Oklahoma’s tribes have become economic powerhouses, contributing hugely to the state economy. But some tribes are faring much better than others. Which tribes are doing well? Has the political influence of Native Americans – and the treatment of their culture – changed in line with growing economic success? And, are there valuable lessons to be learned from Oklahoma for indigenous peoples in the rest of the United States and around the world?

Bison grazing
Sequoia Hughes / Flickr.com

The Cherokee Nation is set to receive a tractor-trailer load of bison to add to the tribe's herd on its 1,000-acre ranch in the unincorporated Kenwood community in northeastern Oklahoma.

The tribe is to receive about 50 bison from a national park in South Dakota on Thursday after acquiring the animals from the InterTribal Buffalo Council. The Cherokee Nation had gone 40 years without raising bison until last year and now has 68 head of bison on its ranch.

Muscogee (Creek) Principal Chief George Tiger
muscogeenation-nsn.gov

Updated September 10, 2015 at 11:47 a.m:

The principal chief of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation says he won’t sign a resolution asking the Carter Center Democracy Program to monitor the tribe’s next election. The tribe’s National Council passed the measure at an emergency session on Tuesday with a vote of 9 to 6.

 

In a written statement, principal chief George Tiger said the tribe's election process is outlined in the Muscogee (Creek) laws and constitution. He wants to be careful about protecting the tribe's sovereignty.

As a member of the Navajo tribe, Rochelle Jake has received free care through the Indian Health Service her entire life. The IHS clinics took care of her asthma, allergies and eczema — chronic problems, nothing urgent.

Recently, though, she felt sharp pains in her side. Her doctor recommended an MRI and other tests she couldn't get through IHS. To pay for them, he urged her to sign up for private insurance under the Affordable Care Act.

photo of slot machine
Frank Bonilla / Flickr

Leaders with the Muscogee (Creek) Nation are working to address an $18 million shortfall in the tribe's gaming budget for the 2016 fiscal year.

Principal Chief George Tiger addressed members of the tribe's National Council during an emergency meeting Thursday night. Tiger says he hopes the council takes the issue seriously because a budget must be approved before the federal fiscal year ends Sept. 30.

Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker
Cherokee Nation

Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker has been sworn in for his second, four-year term.

More than 1,000 people attended Friday's inauguration at Sequoyah High School in the tribal capital of Tahlequah to watch Baker and Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden sworn in.

Tribal councilors Rex Jordan, David Walkingstick, Shawn Crittenden, Dick Lay, Buel Anglen, Bryan Warner, Keith Austin and Wanda Hatfield also took office.

The seal of the Cherokee Nation
Cherokee Nation

A recount supervised by the Cherokee Nation Supreme Court has finalized the candidates in a runoff election.

The Cherokee Nation Election Commission on Friday announced the results of the Thursday recount, with Wanda Hatfield and Betsy Swimmer advancing to a July 25 runoff for an at-large tribal councilor position. The final results show Hatfield with 1,057 votes and Swimmer with 763.

Shane Jett, who came in third, finished 50 votes behind Swimmer. The general election results were certified Monday and Jett requested the recount on Wednesday.

National Archives And Records Administration

Jim Thorpe. One of the greatest athletes of the 20th century – if not the greatest. After winning two gold medals at the 1912 Olympics, Sweden’s King Gustav V reportedly told him, “You, sir, are the greatest athlete in the world.”

Thorpe’s response? “Thanks.”

The White House

One of Oklahoma’s native daughters, Suzan Shown Harjo, received the highest honor this country bestows upon a civilian, the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Harjo is founder and president of The Morning Star Institute in Washington, DC, and a poet, writer, curator, lecturer and policy advocate, who has helped Native peoples protect sacred places and recover more than one million acres of land.

Native News Week In Review

Dec 12, 2014
Susan Shannon

Two Tribal Attorneys General Join The Northern Oklahoma District Indian Prosecution Unit

Two Tribal Special Assistant U.S. Attorneys, one each from the Osage Nation and Cherokee Nation, were sworn-in at an investiture ceremony Thursday and will assist with improving public safety in tribal communities, announced Danny C. Williams Sr., United States Attorney for the Northern District.

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