Indian Times

News and interviews from Indian Country.

Eden, Janine and Jim / Flickr.com

2014 may well be remembered as the year of the virus. Prior to the focus on Ebola in Texas, the country’s health care systems were concerned with a nationwide outbreak of enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), which primarily targets children.

Billy Mills

Last Tuesday was the 50th anniversary of Ogalala Lakota runner Billy Mills' surprise victory at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics.

Mills, a member of the Ogalala Lakota Nation, remains the only American to win gold in the 10,000 meters track event, and his race was one of those historic upsets for the record books.

Susan Shannon

Chickasaw Governor Bill Anoatubby has long wanted to make films commemorating some of his tribe’s more renowned members. Among the names on Anoatubby’s short list is a woman he considers a great ambassador for his tribe and all Native Americans, Te Ata.

American Indian Cultural Center And Museum

If you don’t build it, they won’t come…that’s basically what Blake Wade, Executive Director of the Native American Cultural Authority, intimated when extolling the virtues of a completed American Indian Cultural Center and Museum. Not only would the museum be a world class attraction, the surrounding 220 acres of commercial property would be developed to match the museum’s potential.

OU School of Law

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor came to the University of Oklahoma last week to speak at the OU School of Law. One of the last questions came from a Choctaw student who greeted her in Choctaw.

"Halito, (words in Choctaw) yakoke. As Professor Tai said, my name is Kelbie Kennedy and I'm a proud citizen of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma,” said Kennedy. “I am so glad that you are preserving your native language. It’s so important for people in your generation to do that, thank you for attempting and succeeding obviously!” Sotomayor said.

Native American Pioneer In Medicine Recognized

Sep 12, 2014
Dr. Everett Rhoades

The first Native American to head the Indian Health Service was a rarity, one of the earliest Indian doctors in the country, and it was a bit lonely.

“I only knew of two Indian physicians accidentally, the famous Dr. Taylor McKenzie, the late great Navajo leader, Taylor McKenzie and another individual whom I didn't know but knew of, named Thomas St. Germaine Whitecloud, a member of the Lac du Flambeau Chippewas,” Dr. Everett Rhoades said.

theilr / Flickr.com

Sovereignty and food aren’t two words usually heard together.

“Food sovereignty in a nutshell means the rights that we have to not only grow and procure our own food but also to have access to water, land and resources to grow our own food,” Brenda Golden said.

Golden is a policy analyst for the Muscogee Creek Nation and a longtime native rights activist. The two back to back conferences next week are close to her heart and she takes pride in the fact that her tribe will be host.

Cole Says Tribal Jobs Are Here To Stay

Aug 29, 2014
Susan Shannon

The recent reports of employers leaving the United States for tax breaks won’t ever happen with certain businesses in Oklahoma: those companies belong to tribes, and they’re here to stay.

That’s one big message from Oklahoma Congressman Tom Cole. At his recent town hall meeting in Purcell, Cole (Chickasaw) said the sovereign tribes of Oklahoma are also their own corporations—buying, selling, and creating jobs.

Business And Arts In Oklahoma's Indian Country

Aug 23, 2014
Indian Country Business Summit

Doing Business With Indian Country Or U.S. Government Can Be Tricky But Not Impossible.

Providing a roadmap for doing business with tribal agencies or the federal government, including FEMA and military bases, is the purpose of the 8th annual Indian Country Business Summit taking place next week in Norman.

Denise Bowman is a counselor and conference organizer at the Tribal Government Institute, one of the sponsors of the Indian Country Business Summit. Bowman says sometimes good business is about timing.

Aaron Carapella

When Aaron Carapella (Cherokee) contacted the U.S. Copyright office about his concept for a map that showed Native America pre-contact, he was told it had never been done before on such a grand scale.

This news seemed to validate his hours of long work, traveling and contacting more than 250 reservations and tribal communities. It had all started when he was an adolescent growing up in southern California.

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