KGOU

KGOU Sunday Radio Matinee

Sundays 12 - 1 p.m.

Public radio has many excellent limited-run programs that are regularly featured in this 'variety' hour: Intelligence Squared U.S., America Abroad, Invisibilia, etc. The Sunday Radio Matinee also plays host to KGOU's own documentary productions and various other special content offerings. 

Coming Up: 

More Perfect
Credit Radiolab / WNYC

Sundays at noon through October! 

More Perfect (episodes 1-5)

The Supreme Court of the United States reconvenes this month and we thought the occasion marked the perfect opportunity to explore the history and inner workings of the highest court in the land by way of More Perfect - a 5-part special from the makers of Radiolab.  

Supreme Court decisions shape everything from marriage and money to public safety and sex. We know these are very important decisions we should all pay attention to – but they often feel untouchable and even unknowable.

Radiolab's spin-off series More Perfect connects you to the decisions made inside the court's hallowed halls, and explains what those rulings mean for "we the people" who exist far from the bench. More Perfect bypasses the wonkiness and tells stories behind some of the court’s biggest rulings.

 

Past Sunday Radio Matinee Features: 

Melyssa Rodiguez shares her story.
Jason Falchook/The Moth

This week's Sunday Radio Matinee feature is a special Mother's Day edition of The Moth Radio Hour. A mother helps her daughter get her first contact lenses, an unwanted parental intervention at a school concert, a new mother in Zambia awaits test results, a life or death bee sting and a teenage mother who couldn't be happier to welcome her child to the world. Join The Moth's Artistic Director Catherine Burns for an hour of stories by, for and about Mom! 

Oklahoma has one of the largest Native American populations in the United States. By using their right to govern themselves, some of Oklahoma’s tribes have become economic powerhouses, contributing hugely to the state economy. But some tribes are faring much better than others. Which tribes are doing well? Has the political influence of Native Americans – and the treatment of their culture – changed in line with growing economic success? And, are there valuable lessons to be learned from Oklahoma for indigenous peoples in the rest of the United States and around the world?

robot arm holding human skull
IQ2US/PRX

As technology rapidly progresses, some proponents of artificial intelligence believe that it will help solve complex social challenges and offer immortality via virtual humans. But AI’s critics say that we should proceed with caution, that any rewards may be overpromised, and the pursuit of 'super' intelligence and autonomous machines may result in unintended consequences.

The Fifth Beatle: A George Martin Appreciation
Paul Ingles/PRX.org

To say that Sir George Henry Martin was an acclaimed record producer, arranger, composer and audio engineer would be an incomplete summary of his skills. After all, Martin was the “Fifth Beatle.” It was George Martin who helped to transform the lads from Liverpool into the biggest musical act of their time.

Gillian Blease, Getty Images / Intelligence Squared U.S.

Student-involved protests seem to be erupting at increasing rates on university campuses across the country. To many, these students are speaking out against various injustices that have long been manifested in "unwelcoming", sometimes "hostile" environments. But to critics, many of these students have gone too far, creating an atmosphere of intolerance for opposing or unpopular points of view.  Are the protestors silencing free speech, or are they just trying to be heard?

Hearing Voices: Her Stories
Victoria Golding

Host Dmae Roberts of Stories1st.org, for Women's History Month, presents Stories By, For, and Of Women: The Kitchen Sisters go to "Tupperware" parties. A supermarket checker checks out of her life. Jenifir returns "Home From Africa" with all 13 Symptoms of Chronic Peace Corps Withdrawal. We also hear a story-collage of and about "Sisters." In a new syntax of whispers and words, Susan Stone tells the tale of "Ruby" and her husbands. And Sonia Sanchez, Tracie Morris, Jill Battson and Meryn Cadell perform short poems.

Intelligence Squared U.S. "Lifespans Are Long Enough"
Intelligence Squared U.S.

What if we didn’t have to grow old and die? The average American can expect to live for 78.8 years, an improvement over the days before clean water and vaccines, but it's still not long enough for most of us. So researchers around the world have been working on arresting the process of aging through biotechnology.

Lawrence Stasyszen, abbott of St. Gregory's Abbey, stands inside the monastery's condemned workshop in Shawnee, Okla. The monastery and nearby college are still reeling from millions in damage from a 5.7-magnitude quake that struck in 2011.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

In 2014, Oklahoma had more than three times as many earthquakes as California, and this year, the state is on track for even more. A lot of them are small, but some towns are seeing a quake almost every day, and seismologists warn that large and damaging earthquakes are becoming more likely.

The government in the Sooner State has only recently acknowledged the scope of the oil and gas industry’s role in the problem.

From left to right: David Prater, Kris Steele, John Whetsel, Terri White and Clay Bennett participate in a forum Wednesday, Dec. 2, about Oklahoma County's criminal justice system.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Last month the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber outlined a new approach to decrease Oklahoma County’s overcrowded jail population and increase public safety.

Assignment: Radio - December 20, 2015

Dec 20, 2015
Intersection
Daniel Jarosz / Pixabay

This week on Assignment Radio, the student reporters hang out with local musician Ben Hill and bus driver Shirley Bosscawen and visit the McFarland Food Pantry.

Later on in the program they explore the theme of intersections- the points at which paths cross. Just like the streets in a city or lines on a graph, people’s individual journeys through life often converge briefly before continuing off in different directions. These moments can teach us about a different way of looking at the world and even alter the way we look at ourselves.

Farm to fork: Uncovering hazards in our food systems

Dec 6, 2015
illustration of farm worker
Allison McCartney / Reveal

Reveal looks at the complicated networks of labor, trade and regulation that carry meat, produce and other products to our tables.

We’ll upend your ideas about what kind of chicken is most susceptible to salmonella, unveil the secret history of pesticides that fuel the modern strawberry industry and look at a workers movement in Florida that’s transformed the tomato-picking business from the ground up.

The fowl business of salmonella

Assignment: Radio - November 2015

Dec 4, 2015
Radio Microphone
Dennis Hill / Flickr

This is Assignment: Radio, KGOU's student-produced public affairs program focusing on issues and events on the University of Oklahoma campus.

One of the things National Public Radio is known is the powerful one-on-one interviews of journalists like Terry Gross and Diane Rehm. This week the Assignment Radio student reporters try their hand at the format… One guest, one microphone and a few questions in mind to help us gain some insights into the lives and experiences of others.  

Intelligence Squared U.S.

Today, a national debate rages about the functioning of our criminal justice system. Is it fair? Does it serve the ends of justice and public safety? Does it apply equally to all? Prosecutors, endowed with both autonomy and immunity, hold immense power within this system. They control secret grand jury proceedings, who will be prosecuted, and the specifics of charges.

Reveal: A Mountain of Misconduct

Nov 8, 2015
Watercolor rendering of Lakeview entrance
Anna Vignet / Reveal

This month on Reveal, we team up with New Hampshire Public Radio health and science reporter Jack Rodolico to unveil 40 years of alleged abuse and neglect of people with disabilities at specialty rehab centers across the U.S.

We zoom in and take a close look at Lakeview NeuroRehabilitation Center, a facility nestled in the wooded foothills of New Hampshire’s White Mountains, where people with severe disabilities were treated. For families all over the country, Lakeview was the last resort for their loved ones. For the owners, it was a lucrative business.

Ken Rudin's "Election 2016: One Year Out"
Ken Rudin/PRX

Join Political Junkie Ken Rudin as he offers a broad examination of the 2016 presidential election in an hour-long "Political Junkie" special. 

Intelligence Squared U.S. - "Are China and the U.S. long-term enemies?"
Intelligence Squared U.S.

Is China’s ascendancy a threat to the U.S.?  China’s rise as an economic and military power, coupled with its aggression in the South China Sea, have led some to call for a major rebalance of U.S. policy and strategy. Can China be trusted to act as a responsible global stakeholder? And will they be a long-term ally, or adversary? Intelligence Squared U.S. host and moderator John Donvan guides this debate over U.S. relations with China.  

Assignment: Radio - October 18, 2015

Oct 18, 2015
Wikimedia

This is the semester's first episode of Assignment: Radio, KGOU's student-produced public affairs program focusing on issues and events on the University of Oklahoma campus.

This week the Assignment Radio reporters talk to three Oklahoma women showing strength in unique ways.

First, Patrick Smith looks into the work of Parents Helping Parents, a local support group for people with children facing challenges. He talks to a woman who was helped by her involvement in the group.

dry fountain
Julia B. Chan / Reveal

From the parched California coast to soaring water bills in New York, this episode of Reveal takes an in-depth look at water issues around the country.

Reporters track down water guzzlers in the Golden State, where some people are using millions of gallons of water in the middle of a historic drought. But their identities are kept secret.

IQ2 U.S. / Intelligence Squared U.S.

High-profile cases have recently put campus sexual assault in the spotlight. One question that has repeatedly come up: why are these cases being handled by campuses at all? Title IX requires that every school receiving federal aid must take concrete steps to deal with hostile environments and sexual assault. This leaves colleges and universities with the task of figuring out what policies and procedures to enforce.

State Of The Re: Union

In the last episode of State of the Re:Union, the team brings you a collection of our favorite stories from the road. Host Al Letson reflects on six years of SOTRU and says goodbye to the show.

Segments:

·         Medical Migrants (from The Sorting of America episode)

·         Superman! (from the Comics episode)

·         Dear Appalachia Letter (from the Appalachia episode)

·         The Crossing: Chayo (from the Tucson episode)

·         Honest-to-Goodness True Alabama Juke Joint

·         Reflection

Pages