Oklahoma Voices

Mondays 11 a.m. - 12 Noon

Oklahoma newsmakers talking about the issues that affect the Sooner state and beyond.

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Organized citizens of large cities can be a greater force of innovation in leadership than state or federal governments, according to the vice president of the Brookings Institution.

Bruce Katz discussed the premise of his book The Metropolitan Revolution during a January 28 event at the University of Central Oklahoma. He emphasized the country’s economic growth model needs to “get back to the fundamentals” without relying on state and federal governments to lead the way.

Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

For more than two decades, Oklahoma has increasingly turned to fines and fees from court cases to pay for the court system itself. An investigation between KGOU and Oklahoma Watch called Prisoners of Debt reveals that as many inmates regain their freedom, they’re still imprisoned by mountains of debt.

Lack of funding and access to services and lack of political will have prevented many Oklahomans with mental illness and addiction problems from getting the help they need, leaders in the field told an Oklahoma City audience Tuesday night.

Education policy is among the top concerns facing lawmakers as they begin a new legislative session at the state capitol. Recent policy debates over the A-F system of grading public schools, Common Core, and third grade reading sufficiency testing have prompted educators to speak out more in hopes of shaping state education policy. 

Stateline: Cowboys Of Color

Jan 26, 2015

The cowboy is an American icon. The Hollywood image of the cowboys is lone, rugged and white, but in reality the old west was very diverse, and many of the cowboys were African-American or Hispanic.

Every year, culturally diverse cowboys from all over the country come to the Cowboys of Color Rodeo in Oklahoma City.

OETA Managing Editor and Deputy Director Dick Pryor discuss the importance and preservation of American Indian culture in Oklahoma, with:

OETA Deputy Director and Managing Editor Dick Pryor discusses the top stories and the best and the worst of 2014 and look ahead to 2015.

Shelly Deas, principal of Lee Elementary School in Oklahoma City, shows the school’s system for tracking achievement and improvement levels of each student. Students in blue are at the highest performing level; students in red are at the lowest.
Clifton Adcock / Oklahoma Watch

At Oklahoma State University’s annual Economic Outlook Conference last week, industry professionals criticized low teacher pay, but forecasted continued job growth in education and several other jobs through 2015.

The Oklahoma Department of Commerce’s Deputy for Workforce Development Diedre Myers questioned how to best prepare Oklahomans for the surge. 

“What do our Oklahoma citizens need to do to have successful careers over their lifetime?” she asked.

Left-to-right: Economists Robert Dauffenbach, Russell Evans, Mickey Hepner, and Dan Rickman during a panel discussion moderated by Oklahoma City advertising executive Rhonda Hooper
Carrie Snodgrass / Greater Oklahoma City Chamber

Several economists praised Oklahoma's metro areas as engines of growth, but criticized state leaders for failing to plan for the long term.

University of Minnesota political scientist Lawrence Jacobs during a Nov. 10, 2014 luncheon at the Jim Thorpe Association and Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Over the weekend, millions of Americans had the opportunity to sign up for health insurance as the annual enrollment window opened for coverage under the Affordable Care Act.

University of Minnesota political scientist Lawrence Jacobs traveled to Oklahoma City last week to speak at an Oklahoma Policy Institute luncheon. He argued state and federal officials would soon shift discussions away from an outright repeal of the healthcare plan.

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