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Science Friday

Fridays 1 - 3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Ira Flatow

Science Friday is a weekly science talk show, broadcast live over public radio stations nationwide from 2-4 p.m. Eastern time. Each week, we focus on science topics that are in the news and try to bring an educated, balanced discussion to bear on the scientific issues at hand. Panels of expert guests join Science Friday's host, Ira Flatow, a veteran science journalist, to discuss science -- and to take questions from listeners during the call-in portion of the program.

To participate, call 1 (844) 724-8255 or Twitter users can tweet questions @scifri.

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Ways to Connect

Solar panels are cheaper than ever. But some manufacturers are losing money.

7 hours ago
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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/usfws_pacificsw/8159035850/in/photostream/">Sarah Swenty/USFWS</a>. <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>. Image cropped.&nbsp;

The price of solar photovoltaic panels is coming down, and it’s great news for consumers, solar installers and the environment.

But not everyone is happy about cheap solar: The price of solar photovoltaics is so low, that, according to Bloomberg, some manufacturers were likely selling at a loss in December 2016.

The Gesture That Changed Human History

10 hours ago

Where Do Baby Seahorses Come From?

10 hours ago

Animating the friendly ocean in Disney's 'Moana'

Jan 16, 2017

Disney’s newest animated film “Moana” tells the story of a teenager who goes on a quest to save her people, leaving the safety of her home island in the South Pacific to travel the ocean.

Three ways to die on Venus, and other space facts

Jan 14, 2017

Today we call it the “Big Dipper,” but in the year 75000, we may look up in the night sky and admire a constellation known affectionately as the “Big Spatula.”

As astronomer Dean Regas explains, that’s because the stars are moving relative to our position here. “And so you know, over thousands and thousands of years, the constellations we see today will actually change a little bit,” he says. “Where we saw the Big Dipper, they'll see something that looks like a big spatula. And who knows what kind of mythology will spring from that.”

Citizen scientists have been taking an annual ‘bird census’ for over a century

Jan 14, 2017
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<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/kim/16677151112/">Finiky</a>/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>. Image cropped.&nbsp;

As snow, wind and rain kept many of us cozy inside our homes this December, thousands of bird-watchers grabbed their binoculars and headed out for a day in the elements.

Theirs was no average bird-nerd-devotion: They were on a mission to count every bird they saw or heard, as part of the National Audubon Society's 117th annual Christmas Bird Count.

The count, which begins every Dec. 14 and wraps every Jan. 5, is a census of local bird populations.

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