KGOU

Science Friday

Fridays 1 - 3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Ira Flatow

Science Friday is a weekly science talk show, broadcast live over public radio stations nationwide from 2-4 p.m. Eastern time. Each week, we focus on science topics that are in the news and try to bring an educated, balanced discussion to bear on the scientific issues at hand. Panels of expert guests join Science Friday's host, Ira Flatow, a veteran science journalist, to discuss science -- and to take questions from listeners during the call-in portion of the program.

To participate, call 1 (844) 724-8255 or Twitter users can tweet questions @scifri.

More information

Ways to Connect

A Narwhal’s Slow, Anxious Heart

Dec 11, 2017

Invasion Of The Jellyfish

Dec 11, 2017

Microbes In Space! (But They’re Ours)

Dec 11, 2017

Another way to look at the fossil record? By examining coal.

Dec 10, 2017

If you’re like most people, you probably think of coal as a chunk of black fossil fuel. Geologist Jen O’Keefe sees it differently: For her, each piece of coal is a window back in time. 

“I'm really interested in why we have coal in the first place, and what it can tell us about ancient environments,” says O’Keefe, a professor of geology and science education at Morehead State University. “We've got this great time capsule in our backyard that we can start to pick apart.”

After Cassini, where to next?

Dec 9, 2017

The Cassini spacecraft just ended its 13-year orbit around Saturn in September, and scientists are already dreaming of where to send the next orbiter.

For the future of self-driving technology, look to ... bats?

Dec 9, 2017
8
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/sandy-frost/8019878370/in/album-72157631612933493/">S. Frost/USFS</a>. <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/">CC BY-SA 2.0</a>. Image cropped.

Venture near a cave at night, and you may glimpse a phenomenon that still stymies scientists: Thousands of bats streaming out of the cave at high speeds, using echolocation to avoid in-air collisions.

“All we know about science, physics, biology says that [bats are] doing an impossible task by echolocating in these large groups,” says Laura Kloepper, an assistant professor of biology at Saint Mary’s College in Indiana. “What we know about how echolocation works is that when they're in these groups, the signals from each bat should be interfering with each other.”

A Narwhal’s Slow, Anxious Heart

Dec 8, 2017

Microbes In Space! (But They’re Ours)

Dec 8, 2017

Dusting Off Voyager 1’s Thrusters

Dec 8, 2017

The Best Science Books Of 2017

Dec 8, 2017

Invasion Of The Jellyfish

Dec 8, 2017

Microbes In Space! (But They’re Ours)

Dec 8, 2017

Pages