Science Friday

Fridays 1 - 3 p.m.
Ira Flatow

Science Friday is a weekly science talk show, broadcast live over public radio stations nationwide from 2-4 p.m. Eastern time. Each week, we focus on science topics that are in the news and try to bring an educated, balanced discussion to bear on the scientific issues at hand. Panels of expert guests join Science Friday's host, Ira Flatow, a veteran science journalist, to discuss science -- and to take questions from listeners during the call-in portion of the program.

To participate, call 1 (844) SCI-TALK (724-8255) or Twitter users can tweet questions @scifri.

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NPR Story
11:04 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Teaching Newton's Laws Through Rhyme

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Would you rather learn geology from this guy?

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: First of all, the substance of moraines are merely the rocks that have been chipped off from the sides of the containing rock mountains, let's say.

FLATOW: (Snoring) Oh, excuse me. Or this guy?

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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NPR Story
11:04 am
Fri August 2, 2013

For Asteroid Ideas, NASA Looks to the Crowd

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. You've seen the movies: A killer asteroid approaching the earth. Cue the dramatic music. Hollywood heroes - James Garner's my favorite - to save the day. But in order to stop an asteroid, first you need to be able to find it, track it, and maybe even know a bit more about asteroids, so you have a better chance of dealing with it successfully.

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NPR Story
11:08 am
Fri July 26, 2013

The 'Uncool' Passion of Jonathan Franzen

Best-selling novelist Jonathan Franzen has fallen in love...with birds. Writing for the July issue of National Geographic magazine, Franzen describes how migrating songbirds are being hunted in high numbers in Egypt, Albania, and other places along the Mediterranean. Franzen tells SciFri about the songbirds' plight and how his passion for birds has evolved.

NPR Story
11:08 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Uncovering the Mystery of J.K. Rowling's Latest Novel

One of the biggest mysteries of the new detective novel The Cuckoo's Calling was the identity of the author. It was written by Robert Galbraith, which was revealed to be the pseudonym of Harry Potter creator J.K. Rowling. Patrick Juola, professor of computer science at Duquesne University, discusses how he used computerized text analysis to uncover the mystery.

NPR Story
11:08 am
Fri July 26, 2013

MERS Virus Update

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is an illness caused by a newly discovered virus in the same family as SARS. Most of the documented cases have come from Saudi Arabia, which has seen a 54 percent mortality rate in those patients. Martin Cetron, director of the Division of Global Migration and Quarantine at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, discusses the emerging virus.

NPR Story
9:41 am
Fri July 19, 2013

DIY Summer Hacks, From the Pool to the Grill

Ever tried to make your own sunscreen? A water bottle rocket? How about a cardboard canoe? Eric Wilhelm, founder of Instructables, and Mike Szczys, managing editor at Hackaday.com, discuss their favorite do-it-yourself summer projects. And Bon Appetit's Andrew Knowlton suggests some cooking hacks, like "cooler corn" and turning your BBQ into a smoker.

NPR Story
9:41 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Fish Oil: Too Much of a Good Thing?

Fish oil may have some benefit for the heart. But a study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute links higher blood levels of the omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil to a higher risk of prostate cancer. Study author Alan Kristal says the potential mechanism is unclear, but he warns that supplements can sometimes increase the risk of the very diseases they're meant to prevent.

NPR Story
9:41 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Astronomers Spot Another Moon Around Neptune

Astronomers have detected a previously unseen moon orbiting Neptune, bringing the planet's moon count to 14. Mark Showalter, an astronomer at the SETI Institute, describes how he spotted the 12-mile moon while combing through old images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope.

NPR Story
9:09 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Trying to Energize the Push for a Smart Grid

For years, electrical experts have been calling for a "smart grid" that could better sense and adapt to changing conditions, from electrical outages to shifts in power consumption. Massoud Amin, referred to by some as the "father of the smart grid," talks about how and why the country should improve its aging electrical infrastructure.

NPR Story
9:09 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Mysterious Radio Bursts, Sent From Deep Space

Reporting in Science, researchers write of discovering four radio bursts from outer space. Physicist Duncan Lorimer, who detected the first such explosion in 2007, discusses what could be causing these radio signals, such as evaporating black holes, an idea proposed by Stephen Hawking in the 1970s.

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