World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

You can contact the show directly at worldviews@ou.edu, or follow the program on Twitter @worldviewsKGOU.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
51828ad7e1c89124f3970a4b|51828ad1e1c89124f3970a29

Pages

World Views
4:30 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

World Views: September 13, 2013

LIsten to the entire September 13, 2013 episode

Earlier this week President Obama asked congressional leaders to postpone a vote on legislation that would authorize the use of force against Syria. Joshua Landis provides an update on what's next in the volatile region.

Later, journalist Erielle Reshef joins Suzette Grillot for a conversation about covering the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Before returning to her home state last year to anchor and report for KOCO-TV, the Oklahoma City native spent several years working for the Israeli Broadcasting Authority.

World Views
11:32 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Big Winners In Latest Syria Developments? Moscow And Assad

President Obama meets in the White House Situation Room with his national security advisors to discuss strategy in Syria, Saturday, August 31, 2013.
Credit Pete Souza / The White House

Joshua Landis recaps this week's developments in Syria with Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise .

Earlier this week President Obama asked congressional leaders to postpone a vote on legislation that would authorize the use of force against Syria.

“We will work together in consultation with Russia and China to put forward a resolution at the U.N. Security Council requiring Assad to give up his chemical weapons and to ultimately destroy them under international control,” the president said in a televised address to the nation Tuesday night.

Joshua Landis, the Director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma and the author of the influential and widely-read blog Syria Comment, says the new diplomatic development is a victory for Moscow.

Read more
World Views
3:35 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

How An Oklahoma Journalist Found The Humanity In The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Erielle Reshef reports from an Iron Dome missile defense site in Ashkelon during a 2012 rocket barrage.
Erielle Reshef Facebook

Between 2010 and 2012, Oklahoma City native Erielle Reshef reported twice from Gaza during instances of cross-border violence between Israelis and Palestinians.

She stood next to an Israeli Iron Dome missile defense system covering the firefight for the Israeli Broadcasting Authority (IBA). But even as the Katyushsa rockets headed toward the country, she told KGOU’s World Views she never once felt unsafe.

Read more
World Views
4:30 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

World Views: September 6, 2013

Listen to the entire September 6, 2013 episode.

Joshua Landis, Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot talk about the fear in Japan that the amount of contaminated water at the Fukushima nuclear power plant is getting out of hand, and increasing number of attacks and violence against women in India.

Later, a conversation with about indigenous people and issues in Guatemala with Francisco Calí. He’s the only indigenous member of the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.

World Views
4:25 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Understanding Issues Of Land And Wealth For Indigenous Guatemalans

A Kakchiquel family in the hamlet of Patzutzun, Guatemala.
Credit John Isaac / UN Photo

Listen to Suzette Grillot's Conversation with Francisco Calí.

In 1996, Guatemala ended a 36-year civil war that devastated the country’s indigenous community. Seventeen years later, indigenous people in the Central American country are still seeking justice after the decades-long conflict.

“They agreed to sign not only a peace agreement, but also an amnesty law which says that all those people who committed human rights violations will not be prosecuted legally,” says Francisco Calí. He’s the only indigenous member of the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.

Read more
World Views
2:05 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

India Gang Rape Puts Spotlight On Broader Worldwide Sexual Violence

Protesters at India Gate in Delhi demanding the government to take action after the gang rape - Dec. 21, 2012.
Credit Ramesh Lalwani / Flickr Creative Commons

A fast-track court will give a verdict next week in the trial of four men accused in the gang rape and fatal beating of a woman on a New Delhi bus last year.

The assault caused nationwide outrage and forced the government to change rape laws and create fast-track courts for rape cases.

University of Oklahoma College of International Studies Dean Suzette Grillot says even though there’s outrage over the increasingly-common attacks against women, there’s not enough push to have an impact on the sentences these young men receive.

Read more
World Views
11:00 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Japanese Fishing Feels Fallout From Fukushima

A Japanese fisherman prepares Sanma from Hokkaido - August 7, 2011
Credit Jamie Williams / Flickr Creative Commons

South Korea is banning all fish imports from Japan's Fukushima region because of what it calls growing public worry over radiation contamination that has reportedly prompted a sharp decline in fish consumption.

“They're trying to rebuild after all of this, and there [are] still contaminants there,” University of Oklahoma College of International Studies Assistant Dean and comparative politics expert Rebecca Cruise told KGOU’s World Views. “The fishing industry is almost devastated and they still have people that are displaced from these events.”

Read more
World Views
4:30 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

World Views: August 30, 2013

Listen to the entire August 30, 2013 episode.

As President Obama and Congress decide how to respond to the use of chemical weapons in Syria, Joshua Landis outlines some of the implications for both the United States and the Middle East.

Later, a conversation with Chad and Tara Jordan of Cornerstone International. The siblings and Oklahoma native founded the consulting firms to teach businesses and non-profits how to provide humanitarian aid more efficiently.

World Views
4:25 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Shut Up And Give? Oklahomans Rethinking International Development And Philanthropy

A family in rural Bangladesh that sells milk to Grameen Danone Foods.
Chad Jordan Cornerstone International

Chad Jordan volunteered in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake, but seeing the state of infrastructure, sanitation conditions, and the lack of financial services after decades and billions of dollars of humanitarian aid affected him even more than the temblor’s destruction.

“It’s really been used for projects that are corrupt,” Jordan says. “It doesn’t really go toward projects that are really sustaining people and focusing on business.”

Read more
World Views
4:12 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

UPDATE: Obama Says He's Considering "Narrow" Syria Action

President Barack Obama meets with his National Security Staff to discuss the situation in Syria, in the Situation Room of the White House, Aug. 30, 2013.
Credit Pete Souza / The White House

President Barack Obama says he hasn't made a final decision about a military strike against Syria. But he says he's considering a limited and narrow action in response to a chemical weapons attack that he says Syria'sgovernment carried out last week.

“We don't know how hard they're going to hit [President Bashar] Assad, but clearly they're going to hit Assad,” says Joshua Landis, a leading Syria watcher and the director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma. “What Obama articulated very clearly is that we can hit him hard enough to dissuade him from using chemical weapons again. So it's worth it to try to extend that and punish Assad and make him think twice about using again.”

Obama says that attack was a challenge to the world and threatens U.S. national security.

 

Read more

Pages