World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

You can contact the show directly at worldviews@ou.edu, or follow the program on Twitter @worldviewsKGOU.

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World Views
11:52 am
Thu May 30, 2013

How Turkey Became The Nicest House In A Rough Neighborhood

The Golden Horn and Bosporus from the Suleiman Mosque, Istanbul.
Joshua Landis Facebook

Over the last decade, Turkey has averaged at least five percent growth of gross domestic product per year with a per capita income now more than $17,000, according to the country’s Ministry of Finance.

Those numbers are only expected to rise, even as a revolution continues to boil over next door in Syria, Iran faces severe economic sanctions, and economies in Greece and Cyprus melt down.

Joshua Landis, the Director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma, says after Turkey’s attempt to join the European Union failed, Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan forged a new path, facing neither East nor West.

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World Views
8:21 am
Thu May 30, 2013

High-resolution Imaging Gives Art New Life Online

Charles I (1600-1649), Oil on canvas, c. 1636
Sir Anthony van Dyck Royal Collection © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

Listen to Suzette Grillot's interview with Desmond Shawe-Taylor and Anna Somers Cocks.

Technology is changing the way we experience art. High-resolution imaging not only allows museum curators to catalog and preserve their collections, it also changes the structure and function of the museums themselves.

“If you look at almost any great museum, it starts either with the collections of private individuals, or else with the heads of state,” says Anna Somers Cocks, founding editor of The Art Newspaper. “If you go around the Met in New York, it's like a kind of series of chapels devoted to various donors – galleries that have not just been financed, but have actually been filled with works of art collected.”

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

World Views: May 24, 2013

Listen to the entire May 24, 2013 episode

Suzette Grillot reports from Istanbul, where she speaks with University of Oklahoma economist Firat Demir about the international response to Monday's deadly tornado in Moore, Okla., and political problems facing Turkey.

University of Oregon political scientist Richard Kraus joins the program for a conversation about how art and culture become a testing ground between the United States and China. He's the author of author of Pianos and Politics in China: Middle-Class Ambitions and the Struggle over Western Music.

World Views
3:46 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

As Syrian Conflict Intensifies, Turkey Fears Renewed Civil Violence

Turkish protesters chant slogans during a demonstration against the government of Syria's President Bashar al-Assad at Beyazit Square in Istanbul, on March 18, 2012
Credit FreedomHouse2 / Flickr

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Firat Demir.

After decades of fighting, the conflict between the Kurdish nationalist group the PKK and the Turkish government finally drew to a close with a ceasefire in March.

Peace in Turkey may be short-lived, though. Violence in neighboring Syria is steadily intensifying, forcing a reluctant Turkey to respond and possibly putting citizens at risk.

“Most people among the Kurdish population are very optimistic,” says Firat Demir, a University of Oklahoma economist. “The last thing now that a citizen of Turkey wants is to have another civil conflict after this 80-year-old bloody conflict that is ending.”

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World Views
12:45 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Across The World, Citizens Empathize With Moore

Stella and Jack Howard (left and right) with their daughter, Dawnelaina (center), sit with the remains of their Moore home. The Howards built this house after their last one was destroyed by the May 3, 1999, twister.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Firat Demir about Turkey's reaction to the May 20 Moore tornado.

From Italy to Istanbul, the tragedy in Moore isn’t far from many people's minds or the front pages of international newspapers.

"We have received an amazing outpouring here from the mayor to regular citizens stopping by to see how they can help," says Rebecca Cruise, who's visiting the University of Oklahoma's center in Arezzo, Italy. "The emails from faculty with students abroad also show how much the world is paying attention to this story."

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World Views
4:07 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Why the Piano is a Political Prop in China

Pianist Lang Lang performs at the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize Concert
Credit Harry Wad / Wikimedia Commons

Listen to Suzette Grillot's interview with Richard Kraus

Art, culture, and politics are closely linked in China, and until the mid-1960s Cultural Revolution government officials viewed Western classical music as an unwelcome outsider.

“For a while the piano was regarded as the ultimate expression of the bourgeoisie,” says Richard Kraus, a University of Oregon political scientist and the author of Pianos and Politics in China: Middle-Class Ambitions and the Struggle over Western Music. “[Then] Mao's wife decided she liked the piano, and there was then sort of the idea that you need to adapt Western technology and art to serve Chinese political purposes. So after about 1968 the piano was alright.”

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World Views: May 17, 2013
4:30 pm
Fri May 17, 2013

World Views: May 17, 2013

Listen to the entire May 17, 2013 episode.

University of Oklahoma political economist and European Union expert Mitchell Smith joins the program for a conversation about the eurozone's economy slipping further into recession, and the American kicked out of Russia over accusations of spying for the CIA.

Veteran diplomat Richard Arndt speaks with Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis about how the national security state changed U.S. diplomatic relations. He's the author of The First Resort of Kings: American Cultural Diplomacy in the Twentieth Century.

World Views
12:44 pm
Fri May 17, 2013

Why Debt-Weary Europe Should Watch Out For A Political Crisis

A demonstrator holds a sign protesting Ireland's continued bank debt - Feb. 9, 2013
Credit William Murphy / Flickr

Slow growth is plaguing many European countries as they struggle to cut their spending and debts. France's GDP has fallen for two consecutive quarters, and Greece's international lenders say unemployment will remain above 20 percent for another three years.

Mitchell Smith, the Chair of OU's Department of International and Area Studies and the Director of the European Union Center, says austerity has generated more than just economic tensions.

"I actually think the political problems a number of European countries are experiencing are even more worrisome than the economic problems," Smith says. "The eurozone countries have, at least for the time being, allayed some of the concerns of financial markets and they don't want to stir things up and start another run-up of a financial crisis."

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World Views
10:13 am
Fri May 17, 2013

Spy Vs. Spy: Latest Arrest Shows Cold War Still Resonates

Visitors flock to Red Square in Moscow
Credit Raul P / Panoramio

The embarrassing arrest of a suspected CIA officer in Moscow is the latest reminder that even after the Cold War, the United States and Russia are engaged in an espionage battle with secret tactics, spying devices, and training that sometimes isn't enough to avoid being caught.

"There's nothing new here," says Suzette Grillot, the Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma. "We spy, everybody spies. There's a long history of spying between these two countries."

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World Views
11:05 am
Tue May 14, 2013

Evolution Of Embassy Construction Shows The Terrorists Won

The U.S. Embassy in Singapore. It opened November 1, 1996 "with with a crenelated walkway is set back from the main road a considerable distance to protect it from bomb blasts."
Credit United States Diplomacy Center / U.S. State Department

Listen to Richard Arndt's conversation with Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis

Earlier this year an independent review by veteran diplomat Thomas Pickering and retired Adm. Mike Mullen slammed the U.S. State Department for inadequate security at the U.S. consulate in Benghazi before the September 11, 2012 attacks that killed four Americans, including the U.S. ambassador.

“The styles of public diplomacy are now constrained by our fear,” says Richard Arndt, a veteran U.S. diplomat and the author of The First Resort of Kings: American Cultural Diplomacy in the  Twentieth Century. ”Which after all is what terrorists try to produce, and which they've amply succeeded in.”

Arndt says as the United States reestablished diplomatic relations with European countries after World War II, the goal was to build the most beautiful embassies possible.

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