KGOU

World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

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Joshua Landis and Suzette Grillot discuss last weekend’s failed coup attempt in Turkey. Hundreds of people died during the uprising, and tens of thousands were arrested during this week’s crackdown.

Then we'll hear a conversation with World Neighbors' Southeast Asia representative Edd Wright. Ever since the 2004 tsunami, he’s been trying to make sure Indonesia is prepared for another catastrophe.

A village near the coast of Sumatra lays in ruin after the Tsunami that struck Southeast Asia
Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Philip A. McDaniel / U.S. Navy

The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami killed more than 200,000 people and led to billions in aid distribution throughout the region.

Edd Wright, the Southeast Asia representative for the Oklahoma City-based international development organization World Neighbors, works on what he calls disaster risk reduction in Indonesia. His group starts by working with governments to identify which villages are most at-risk from disaster, which is followed by a need-based assessment (the communities don’t have to participate). From there, they start to categorize what types of disasters the community has faced.

A member of the black student protest group Concerned Student 1950 gestures while addressing a crowd following the announcement that University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe would resign, at the university in Columbia, Mo. - Nov. 9, 2015
Jeff Roberson / AP

From South Africa, to Palestine, to Haiti, to a small college town in the middle of the United States, you’ll find injustice everywhere.

Clemson University women’s leadership lecturer Saadiqa Lundy has created empowerment and development programs in Africa and the Caribbean, But when Lundy met her husband Chenjerai Kumanyika, she became more of an activist and a protester. She says teaching a subject like that is completely different than actually being there.

Thomas Weiss has spent 40 year studying global governance, the idea that international organizations and groups can work together to solve issues that transcend geographic borders. He'll talk with Suzette Grillot about what it would take for a new generation of intergovernmental organization like what happened after World War II.

But first, she'll be joined by University of Oklahoma political economist and European Union expert Mitchell Smith to talk about what’s next for the United Kingdom and the European Union two weeks after the “Brexit” vote.

Women hold posters during a protest opposing Britain's exit from the European Union in Berlin, Saturday, July 2, 2016. About 50 people staged a protest Saturday in front of Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate against the recent British referendum to leave the EU.
Markus Schreiber / AP

Two weeks after a majority of British voters declared they wanted to leave the European Union, there’s still a tremendous amount of uncertainty about how exactly that’s going to happen.

Thomas Weiss addressing a retreat of UN under-secretaries-general on “The Imperative of Change” at the World Economic Forum, Geneva, April 6, 2016.
Sallysharif / Wikimedia (CC BY-SA 4.0)

Thomas Weiss has spent 40 year studying global governance, the idea that international organizations and groups can work together to solve issues that transcend geographic borders.

“Whether it’s climate change, terrorism, proliferation, Ebola, it simply is impossible for states, no matter how powerful or un-powerful, to address these problems,” Weiss told KGOU’s World Views.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the terrorist attack in Istanbul, and some of the security issues these types of attacks continue.

Later, a conversation with Ambassador John Limbert He and 51 diplomatic and military colleagues were taken prisoner in the former U.S. embassy in Tehran on November 4, 1979. Many were released 444 days later as Ronald Reagan was sworn into office on January 20, 1981.

A group photograph of the former Iranian hostages shortly after their release. The 52 Americans spent a few days in the hospital prior to their departure for the United States.
Johnson Babela / U.S. Department of Defense

Editor's Note: This interview was originally broadcast January 14, 2014

Ambassador John Limbert and 51 diplomatic and military colleagues were taken prisoner in the former U.S. embassy in Tehran on November 4, 1979. They were released 444 days later as Ronald Reagan was sworn into office on January 20, 1981.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Iran's foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif meet in the  Palais Coburg Blue Salon on July 1, 2015 during nuclear deal negotiations.
U.S. Department of State

Financial advisor Hamid Biglari left Iran for the United States in 1977 – two years before the 1979 Islamic Revolution – when his native country produced nearly 6 million barrels of oil per day. In the following decades, Iran’s economy collapsed due to sanctions by the west, and more recently, falling oil prices.

“It turns out that Iran has lost about $135 billion just from the fact that it wasn’t able to produce as much as it did post-sanctions,” Biglari told KGOU’s World Views. But it’s going to lose, over the next five years, about $180 billion. It will lose even more than what it lost during sanctions. So it’s a double-whammy deal.”

Next week, British voters will decide whether or not to withdraw from the European Union, and Suzette Grillot talks about this so-called “Brexit” with Mitchell Smith, the director of the University of Oklahoma’s EU Center.

But first, Suzette and Rebecca Cruise discuss political developments in Italy regarding the Roman mayoral election, and conflict and corruption surrounding precious gem trade in Afghanistan.

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