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World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

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University of Oklahoma Diplomat In Residence Rob Andrew
Provided

Despite its location in a landlocked, central state, the University of Oklahoma’s serves as the home base for Rob Andrew, the U.S. State Department’s Diplomat in Residence for the Central U.S. region.

He grew up in an internationally engaged family - Andrew’s mother is Canadian. His earlier career as a U.S. Army officer who served in the Middle East during the first Gulf War eventually led him to the Foreign Service.

World Views: September 23, 2016

Sep 26, 2016

Joshua Landis provides an update on the latest news from Syria, and Suzette Grillot talks with Kay Bickham from the Oklahoma City chapter of the International Visitors Council.

Oklahoma City Skyline at night
StevenSmith1 / Flickr Creative Commons

While pop-culture references to Oklahoma frequently involve depictions of either tranquil farm folk or tornadic American sharpshooters, few Americans realize the distinctly international role of that the state has. Along with over 200,000 immigrants who call Oklahoma home, both Tulsa and Oklahoma host international delegations through an organization known as Global Ties.


Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss Italy's response to drug trafficking through North Africa, and how it's affecting groups like the Islamic State, who are fighting over the region.

 

Then Grillot talks with journalist and author Maria Armoudian. Her latest book tells the book tells the stories of reporters who cover war zones, the challenges of shrinking budgets, and censorship.

Swaths of cannabis in northern Morocco. The U.N. estimates 80,000 families in the rugged northern Rif mountains make their living from growing marijuana. Their efforst have made Morocco the main hashish supplier for Europe and the world.
Abdeljalil Bounhar / AP

Since 2013, European Union officials have seized hundreds of tons of hashish, worth more than $3 billion, from 20 ships traversing a lucrative drug trafficking route across the Mediterranean.

The drugs flow through multiple countries – Morocco, Libya, Egypt, and some Balkan states – and even areas controlled by self-proclaimed Islamic State militants, who are taxing the shipments as it goes through their territory.

Maria Armoudian
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Maria Armoudian’s first book explored the role radio played in exploiting deeply-held divisions between Hutus and Tutsis during the 1994 Rwandan Genocide.

U.S. men's gymnastics coach Mark Williams says he could sit down for a meal in the Olympic Village and overhear conversations in five different language. He'll share his experiences from Rio de Janeiro and his thoughts on sports diplomacy in a conversation with Suzette Grillot.

But first, Rebecca Cruise talks with University of Oklahoma anthropologist Noah Theriault about the Philippines' new president and his controversial tactics to confront drug trafficking and violence in his country.

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte steps out of his limousine upon arrival at Merdeka Palace to meet Indonesian counterpart Joko Widodo in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, Sept. 9, 2016.
Dita Alangkara / AP

The world’s eyes turned to the Philippines this week after President Rodrigo Duterte made disparaging remarks about President Obama during his visit to Asia. It’s not the first time Duterte’s comments have made international news since he took office in June, previously criticizing the U.S. and U.K.

Germany's Fabian Hambuechen, Britain's Nile Wilson, and United States' Danell Leyva celebrate during the medal ceremony for horizontal bar during 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Aug. 16, 2016.
Rebecca Blackwell / AP

An Olympic hallmark since the 1932 games, the Olympic Village in Rio de Janeiro hosted University of Oklahoma men’s gymnastics coach Mark Williams and his team this summer. Of all the spectacles he saw in Brazil, Williams found the facility one of the most striking.

“The Olympic village is just an amazing place. You can sit down and have lunch and have five different languages in your ear,” Williams said. “One day I just started to count, and I think I got up to 35 different countries represented within about 100 feet of me.”

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump walks with Mexico President Enrique Pena Nieto at the end of their joint statement at Los Pinos, the presidential official residence, in Mexico City, Wednesday.
Dario Lopez-Mills / AP

As the United States gears up for the 2016 presidential election, voters must tackle the ever-present concerns of foreign policy and international engagement. In an era of globalization, increasingly open channels of information, disputes over land and growing trans-national trade, Americans are trying to figure out America’s role in the world.

Suzette Grillot checks in with Erika Larkins. She just returned from a year-long assignment in Brazil, and she'll offer her takeaways from the 2016 Summer Olympic games, which wrapped up Sunday.

But first, Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis join the program to discuss Turkey's recent military moves in Syria, and North Korea's testing of a submarine-launched missile.

A security official stands guard ahead of a men's preliminary volleyball match between Cuba and Iran at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016.
Matt Rourke / AP

In the years since its selection as the site of the 2016 Summer Olympics, Rio de Janeiro has drawn strong opinions both domestically and abroad about the sustainability and feasibility of the global sporting event.

World Views: August 19, 2016

Aug 19, 2016

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot talk about the ethical issues of China’s use of prisoners for organ transplants. The country says the practice has ended, but doctors and non-governmental organizations question whether or not that’s true. They also discuss political strife in South Africa.

Later, we'll revisit Suzette's 2013 conversation with Oklahoma City television journalist Erielle Reshef. Earlier in her career she spent several years working for the Israeli Broadcasting Authority. Two weeks ago she announced she’s leaving her television job at KOCO Channel 5.

Erielle Reshef reports from an Iron Dome missile defense site in Ashkelon during a 2012 rocket barrage.
Erielle Reshef / Facebook

Editor's Note: This conversation originally aired Sept. 13, 2013.

Between 2010 and 2012, Oklahoma City native Erielle Reshef reported twice from Gaza during instances of cross-border violence between Israelis and Palestinians.

Russia's Yulia Efimova, left, looks on as United States' Lilly King celebrates after winning the gold medal in the women's 200-meter breaststroke final during the swimming competitions at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.
Michael Sohn / AP

Beyond the athletic competition, feats of strength, and patriotic triumph, the Olympics serve as a moment where countries can come together and put their differences aside. But politics has played out during the first week of competition.

In the early 1900s, opponents of the Shah wrote a constitution and established a parliament in Iran. 
Suzette Grillot talks with Boston University historian Houchang Chehabi about Iran’s brief 20th century experiment with democracy.

But first, Rebecca Cruise joins the show to talk about some of the positive and negative moments of sportsmanship in the Olympics.

At the top of Rocinha favela in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Suzette Grillot / KGOU

Editor's Note: This interview originally aired June 3, 2014..

A week before the 2014 FIFA World Cup begins in Brazil, soccer’s international governing body has expressed concern that three of the stadiums won’t be ready, and legendary Brazilian striker Ronaldo says he’s “appalled” by his country’s preparations for the sport’s biggest event.

Military medical personnel attend a drill that simulates a biological or nuclear attack at Galeo Air Base in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Friday, July 15, 2016.
Renata Brito / AP

The 2016 Summer Olympics open Friday night in Rio de Janeiro. Like soccer’s World Cup two years ago, the event has drawn the world’s attention to Brazil’s largest city and raised questions about health, security, and the country’s economic and political climate.

As the 2016 Summer Olympics get underway in Rio de Janeiro, we revisit Suzette Grillot's 2014 conversation with University of Oklahoma anthropologist Erika Robb Larkins about the city's poorest neighborhoods.

Larkins then joins the show from Brazil to provide an update on the city's mood and preparation ahead of Friday's opening ceremonies.

Police officers secure the area after a bomb attack in Ansbach, Germany, Monday, July 25, 2016.
Matthias Schrader / AP

Europe continues to reel from violence that has swept over the continent in recent weeks. France is still mourning the loss of more than 80 people killed while celebrating Bastille Day earlier this month. They were killed when a man drove a truck through a crowded promenade in Nice as the seaside resort in the French Rivera celebrated the national holiday.

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