World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

You can contact the show directly at worldviews@ou.edu, or follow the program on Twitter @worldviewsKGOU.

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World Views
12:58 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

German Anti-Islam Protests Not Just About French Attacks, But Larger Refugee Issues

Protesters in Germany, January 19, 2015
Sozialfotografie [►] StR Flickr

Strong crowds showed up for anti-Islam rallies in the German cities of Dresden, Leipzig, and Duisburg throughout the month as part of weekly rallies organized by a group called Patriotic Europeans against the Islamization of the West, or PEGIDA.

Protesters have been wearing black ribbons to show their solidarity with the victims last week's terror attacks in Paris.

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World Views
11:00 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Shifting Middle East Strategy Among Few Foreign Policy Proposals In State Of The Union

President Obama delivers his annual State of the Union address Tuesday night before a joint session of Congress.
The White House Twitter

President Obama spent very little time on foreign policy and foreign affairs during Tuesday night's State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress.

But he did call on lawmakers to pass a resolution authorizing the use of force against self-proclaimed Islamic State militants.

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World Views
10:13 am
Thu January 22, 2015

Idea-Vs.-Reality For African Immigrant Families In A ‘Post-Racial’ France

Credit Quinn Dombrowski / Flickr

The relationship between racial identity and national identity is a contentious subject in France.

France’s National Assembly voted in 2013 to remove any references to race from national legislation, and French President François Hollande has asserted his belief that racial distinctions have no place in French society.

University of Oklahoma sociologist Loretta Bass calls this attitude toward racial issues the “Ostrich Policy.”

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World Views
1:48 pm
Fri January 16, 2015

World Views: January 16, 2015

University of Oklahoma Latin America historian Alan McPherson joins Suzette Grillot for a conversation about what the lifting of trade and travel restrictions could mean for U.S.-Cuban relations.

Then a conversation with Boston University scholar David Collier. Sixty-five years ago Iran unsuccessfully experimented with democracy, and he argues the Islamic Republic can build on this legacy. 

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World Views
10:05 am
Fri January 16, 2015

Tracing Iran’s Unsuccessful Early 20th Century Experiment With Democracy

The Shah of Iran speaking at Washington National Airport during ceremonies welcoming him to the United States as President Harry Truman looks on, November 16, 1949
Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum

“Democracy” probably isn’t the first word that comes to mind when talking about Iran.

But during the first half of the 20th century, the United States was heavily involved with democratization efforts in Iran as part of a strategy of building a buffer against Soviet influence in the Middle East.

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World Views
2:53 pm
Fri January 9, 2015

World Views: January 9, 2015

Rebecca Cruise discusses Wednesday's attack on a satirical newspaper in Paris, and Joshua Landis explains Saudi Arabia’s role in the ongoing fall of global oil prices.

Later, a conversation with Jan-Willem Rosenboom. He’s a senior program officer for water, sanitation and hygiene at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and he and Suzette Grillot talk about market solutions to the sanitation crisis in developing countries. 

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World Views
2:43 pm
Fri January 9, 2015

Saudi Strategy, Monarch's Health Affecting Global Price Of Oil

Saudi King Abdullah talks with newly appointed Saudi Crown Prince Salman bin Abdel-Aziz in Taif June 19, 2012. Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah has appointed his defence minister, Prince Salman, as heir apparent, opting for stability and a continuation of cautious reforms at a time of challenges for the world's biggest oil exporter.
Credit Saudi Press Agency / Reuters

Oil prices continue to fall, down to around $50 per barrel this week, and Saudi Arabia has reportedly asked OPEC members to continue production in order to keep prices low.

It’s working, for them, because they have $750 billion in reserve currency, and will likely gain market share in the long term as it becomes expensive for others in the region to produce oil. But Joshua Landis, the Director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma, argues that American oil companies play a significant role as well.

“It’s the Americans who’ve done this to the world through [hydraulic fracturing],” Landis says. “This new technological innovation has allowed America to become the major producer of oil in the world. We’ve flooded the market, and now we’re expecting the Saudis to reduce their production in order to keep the prices high so Americans can get rich.”

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World Views
1:19 pm
Fri January 9, 2015

'Charlie Hebdo' Attack Draws Parallels To North Korea, 'The Interview' Free Speech Issues

A memorial to the victims of Wednesday's attack at a French satirical newspaper.
Valentina Calà Flickr

The free speech issues raised by Wednesday's terrorist attack in Paris on the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo has drawn comparisons to last year's outcry by North Korea over The Interview.

"It's an interesting comparison because in that film, Kim Jong-un is attacked," says Rebecca Cruise, a comparative politics expert and regular World Views contributor. "He, in North Korea, is considered a deity."

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World Views
11:20 am
Thu January 8, 2015

Finding Short- And Long-Term Solutions To The Developing World’s Sanitation Crisis

In 2008, children collected and carried water from the Savelugu Dam, an area known for a high prevalence of guinea worm. Since then, Ghana has successfully eliminated guinea worm nationwide.
Gates Foundation Flickr

The American non-governmental organization Water.org estimates 11 percent of the population lacks access to safe water, and that women and children spend 200 million hours per day collecting water.

Jan-Willem Rosenboom is a Senior Program Officer for Water, Sanitation and Hygiene at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. He says the organization realized they were effective at community level-work, but didn’t have good ways to deliver services on a large scale.

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World Views
12:08 pm
Thu January 1, 2015

4 Global Stories To Watch In 2015

ben alexander Flickr

On the first episode of KGOU’s World Views this year, Suzette Grillot, Rebecca Cruise, and Joshua Landis look ahead to 2015 and some of the biggest international stories they expect to follow in the coming months.

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