KGOU

World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

Ways to Connect

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talks about nominees in the Best Foreign Language films category at the 2017 Oscars.

Then, Joshua Landis discusses Iran with Narges Bajoghli, an anthropologist and filmmaker. She’s a researcher in International Public Affairs at the Watson Institute at Brown University.

Narges Bajoghli

 

 

The Iranian regime faces a daunting puzzle: How to translate the ideals of the 1979 revolution to a new generation.

That question launched Narges Bajoghli into her research in Iran, which focuses on pro-revolution communication.

“In Iran this is an important question because over 75 percent of the population is under the age of 35, meaning they don't remember the revolution,” Bajoghli said.

Nadim Shehadi

 

During the 20th century, countries in the Middle East developed strong, nationalist states that created a homogenous model for their societies. Lebanon, however, did not follow suit. As Middle East expert Nadim Shehadi likes to say, Lebanon skipped the 20th century altogether.

World Views: February 17, 2017

Feb 17, 2017

Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis talk about the future of the two-state solution in Israel.

Then Suzette speaks with Nadim Shehadi, director of the Fares Center for Easter Mediterranean Studies at Tufts University. They discuss Lebanon's relative stability in a region that is engulfed in conflict.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about ongoing protests in Romania.

Then, Suzette interviews Orville Schell about China's relationship with the world. Schell is an award-winning journalist and former dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at University of California-Berkeley.

Schell: U.S. And Chinese Cooperation Essential For The World

Feb 10, 2017
Orvville Schell
The Asia Society

 

As a college student, China was something of a forbidden land for Orville Schell. He was mystified by the Chinese language, but found it difficult to find a good language course in the United States.

“It was a bit of a terra incognita,” Schell said. “I think the very fact that I couldn't go there was most interesting to me.”

An informal settlement in Zambia, taken during John Harris' 2014 trip.
David Boeck

 

Urbanization is rapidly expanding on a global scale, and it is creating a demand for reorganization of cities and spaces. Urban and regional planners, like John Harris, weigh the different needs of societies to ensure the city suits the people who live in it. Harris focuses on sustainable urbanization, especially in Africa where he has dealt with informal settlements.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise talk about President Trump's executive order that pauses the resettlement of refugees in the United States and bans travel from seven Muslim-majority countries.

Then, Suzette talks with John Harris about sustainable development and informal communities in Africa.

World Views: January 27, 2017

Jan 27, 2017

Suzette Grillot and Rebeccca Cruise talk about sexist dress codes in Britain, and Russia’s attempts to weaken domestic abuse laws.

Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, center, with court security guards at left and right, appears before the U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague, Tuesday July 3, 2001.
AP

 

Ellen Elias-Bursac, current standing Vice President for the American Literary Translation Association and former revision expert for the Yugoslav War Crimes Tribunal, has helped ease the challenges created by language barriers. During her time at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, Elias-Bursac was given the responsibility of translating and verifying evidence during the war crime trials.

Suzette Grillot talks to Rebecca Cruise about British Prime Minister Theresa May's speech outlining Brexit. And as we continue our month-long series on international literature, Suzette talks to University of Toronto literature professor Dragana Obradovic about experiencing war as a child.

Dragana Obradovic, left, with her colleague Christina Kramer
University of Toronto

 

War broke out in the former Yugoslavia when Dragana Obradovic was only eight years old. Her family fled the region as refugees. By the time she was in her 20s, she felt a void about her childhood in the Balkans: She was old enough to remember the war, but too young to grasp its significance. Obradovic began asking questions about her own identity.

Dubravka Ugrešić
Jerry Braun

 

Dubravka Ugresic’s books focus on what she calls “the literariness of literature.” She’s fascinated by literature and likes to play with form and style, as she did in her 1993 novel Steffie Speck in the Jaws of Life, which references authors such as Gustave Flaubert and romance novels.

She is the recipient of many awards, including the University of Oklahoma’s Neustadt International Prize for Literature.

 

 

Suzette Grillot talks to Rebecca Cruise about Malta assuming the presidency of the European Union. They also talk about the violent counterinsurgency and growing refugee problem in Myanmar.

And as we continue our month-long series about international literature, Suzettes interviews Croatian writer Dubravka Ugresic,. Ugresic fled her home after criticizing the nationalist movement that engulfed the former Yugoslavia.

Chad Post
Chad Post

 

A world of literary tradition remains outside the grasp of many American readers because few works are translated into English. Chad Post, the publisher of the University of Rochester’s Open Letter press, works to increase access to international literature by translating and publishing ten books each year.

Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis talk about the Syrian cease-fire that was brokered by Russia and Turkey.

Then Suzette talks with Chad Post, the publisher and director of Open Letter Books, a non-profit literary, translation press housed at the University of Rochester in New York. He’s also the managing editor of Three Percent, a blog that promotes literature in translation.

An anti-Syrian government fighter, left, looks at a Syrian soldier, right, as he leaves the last besieged rebel-held neighborhood of Al-Waer in Homs province, Syria, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016.
SANA via AP

 

A cease-fire backed by Russia and Turkey is falling apart in Syria, and that leaves few good options for rebels in that country who are fighting against president Bashar al-Assad

Joshua Landis, the head of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma, told KGOU’s World Views that Assad intends to take back all Syrian land currently held by rebels. Meanwhile, Turkey’s involvement in the cease-fire is an indication that country will no longer back the rebels.

A group of shamans, holding a President-elect Donald Trump poster, perform their annual pre-New Year ceremony, at Agua Dulce beach in Lima, Peru.
Karel Navarro / AP

2016 started with a strong possibility the United States would elect its first female president, but by the end of the year an outsider with no political experience, an unorthodox campaign style had tapped into discontent with establishment politics and ascended to one of the most powerful positions in the world.

If 2015 was the “year of the protest,” 2016 could arguably be dubbed the “year of the response,” especially at the ballot box in the United States, Europe, and elsewhere.

A wall of photographs of journalists killed while reporting the news lines a wall during the rededication of the Journalists Memorial at the Newseum in Washington, Monday, June 9, 2014.
Charles Dharapak / AP

International journalism has always been a dangerous line of work. Dozens of war correspondents have been killed in every major conflict since World War II.

Suzette Grillot talks about Brazil’s current political and economic challenges with University of Oklahoma anthropologist OU anthropologist Misha Klein.

Then Suzette talks with University of Pennsylvania visiting scholar Shervin Malekzadeh. He studies political participation and education in post-revolutionary Iran, especially when it comes to women.

Pages