World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

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Iran's parliament in Tehran, 1906.
Wikimedia Commons (Public Domain)

Russia and the West are sparring over oil and jockeying for position to gain an upper hand in the Middle East. That sounds like it could’ve come straight from Sunday’s edition of The New York Times, but it actually describes the dynamic more than 100 years ago.  Caught in the middle was Iran, fighting to preserve its young, fledgling democracy.

Yes, that Iran.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss some of the international reaction to this year’s presidential candidate, and how other countries view some of the candidates.

Then Suzette talks with University of Central Oklahoma political scientist Husam Mohamad. He argues U.S. support toward a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is more of a shift in rhetoric rather than actual power.

Men at the Awarta checkpoint in the West Bank show their stomachs to prove they're not carrying explosives, October 1, 2006.
Michael Loadenthal / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

There’s been little progress on achieving peace between Israelis and Palestinians since the 1993 talks in Oslo ended in a memorable handshake between the late Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and President Yasser Arafat.

University of Central Oklahoma political scientist Husam Mohamad argues U.S. support of a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is more of a shift in rhetoric rather than actual power.

"Deport Obama and Allah too" sign
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

There are just five major party contenders left in the 2016 U.S. presidential election – three Republicans and two Democrats – but the world’s attention is focused on Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

U2 performing on one of their concerts of the 360° tour in Gelsenkirchen, Germany on August 3, 2009.
SteBo / Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Rock music and charity have gone hand-in-hand for decades.

Former Beatle George Harrison organized the Concert for Bangladesh in 1971 to raise money and awareness of genocide after the country’s war for independence. Queen Elizabeth knighted The Boomtown Rats’ front man Bob Geldof for organizing the 1985 Live Aid concerts that spanned two continents, and Willie Nelson, John Mellencamp, and Neil Young followed suit for American family farmers. After 9/11, dozens of groups gathered in Madison Square Garden for 2001’s Concert for New York City.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot talk about her trip to Brazil and the reaction and response to the Zika virus, and some of the health and security issues related to a lawsuit against the United Nations over a cholera outbreak in Haiti.

Then Suzette and Joshua Landis talk with Middle East analyst Joseph Bahout about Lebanon’s relationship with Syria as the fifth anniversary of the civil war approaches.

A portrait of President Bashar al-Assad among the trash in the Syrian city of al-Qsair in 2012.
Freedom House / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Syria’s civil war approaches its fifth anniversary a little over a week from now, and there’s no end in sight as the conflict becomes even more nuanced and multi-faceted.

It started with protests against the regime of Bashar al-Assad on March 15, 2011, but quickly became a weaponized conflict and spread beyond the country’s borders as militants poured in, and global players used the unrest as a proxy to advance their own regional interests.

Suzette Grillot has been traveling through South America for the past two weeks, and she'll talk about Argentina’s history and current political situation with Grady Wray, a Spanish professor who leads OU’s study abroad program in Buenos Aires. 

Then Rebecca Cruise joins her for the show's annual preview of the Oscar nominees for Best Foreign Language Film. The 2016 Academy Awards are this Sunday.

Academy Awards
mafleen / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

In one of the more controversial award shows in recent memory, Hollywood’s elite will gather in the Kodak Theatre in Los Angeles on Sunday for the 88th Academy Awards.

Argentina's president Mauricio Macri speaks during a press conference at the Annual Meeting 2016 of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, January 22, 2016.
Michele Limina / World Economic Forum/Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Wednesday marked 70 years since late Argentine leader Juan Perón won his first presidential election, beginning decades of on-again, off-again military dictatorships that didn’t see a return of democracy until the 1990s.

But an economic crisis to kick off the 21st century led to the resignation of president Fernando de la Rúa after a little more than two years on the job.

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