KGOU

World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

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A group photograph of the former Iranian hostages shortly after their release. The 52 Americans spent a few days in the hospital prior to their departure for the United States.
Johnson Babela / U.S. Department of Defense

Editor's Note: This interview was originally broadcast January 14, 2014

Ambassador John Limbert and 51 diplomatic and military colleagues were taken prisoner in the former U.S. embassy in Tehran on November 4, 1979. They were released 444 days later as Ronald Reagan was sworn into office on January 20, 1981.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Iran's foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif meet in the  Palais Coburg Blue Salon on July 1, 2015 during nuclear deal negotiations.
U.S. Department of State

Financial advisor Hamid Biglari left Iran for the United States in 1977 – two years before the 1979 Islamic Revolution – when his native country produced nearly 6 million barrels of oil per day. In the following decades, Iran’s economy collapsed due to sanctions by the west, and more recently, falling oil prices.

“It turns out that Iran has lost about $135 billion just from the fact that it wasn’t able to produce as much as it did post-sanctions,” Biglari told KGOU’s World Views. But it’s going to lose, over the next five years, about $180 billion. It will lose even more than what it lost during sanctions. So it’s a double-whammy deal.”

Next week, British voters will decide whether or not to withdraw from the European Union, and Suzette Grillot talks about this so-called “Brexit” with Mitchell Smith, the director of the University of Oklahoma’s EU Center.

But first, Suzette and Rebecca Cruise discuss political developments in Italy regarding the Roman mayoral election, and conflict and corruption surrounding precious gem trade in Afghanistan.

A Pro-Brexit campaigner hands out leaflets at Liverpool Street station in London, Wednesday, March 23, 2016.
Frank Augstein / AP

Six days from now British voters head to the polls for a referendum on whether or not to leave the European Union. The June 23 vote may be the first step toward concluding Britain’s more than 40-year awkward relationship with the rest of continental Europe.

Provided / ahmed-ahmed.com

Editor's Note: This interview originally aired March 22, 2013.

Audiences most likely know Egyptian-American stand-up comedian Ahmed Ahmed as a member of the Axis of Evil Comedy Tour.

“Comedians have become, most recently, cultural ambassadors of the world,” Ahmed said. “Whether you're in Africa, or America, or Russia, or Asia, laughter is the common language of the world.”

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the time they spent in Italy over the past several weeks, and what they've learned and observed about the European migrant crisis.

Then Suzette talks with Purdue University historian Jennifer Foray about the Dutch history of decolonization, and memorialiaztion, commemoration, and responses to war and trauma in the Netherlands.

The Dutch Queen Juliana signs the document transferring sovereignty to the United States of Indonesia in The Hague,December 27, 1949.
Information Ministry / Republic of Indoneisa (Public Domain)

World War II left the Dutch Empire in flux.

Queen Wilhelmina fled to London, and Japanese occupation of Southeast Asia cut the Netherlands off from the Dutch East Indies, an expansive colony stretching from the tip of mainland Asia to the northern edge of Australia.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the new generation of Kosovar Albanians that are being recruited into organizations like ISIS, and a massive sinkhole in Florence, Italy.

Then Suzette talks with United Nations Special Rapporteur on contemporary racism Mutuma Ruteere. He argues one side effect of globalization is that it actually makes it easier to develop racist or xenophobic beliefs.

Mutuma Ruteere, Special Rapporteur on contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance, briefs journalists at UN Headquarters, November 5, 2012.
Evan Schneider / UN

Contingents from around the world gathered in Istanbul earlier this week for the first-ever United Nations World Humanitarian Summit. The goal is to overhaul how aid is delivered, and to make the world safer for refugees during what the U.N. has called the world’s worst humanitarian crisis since the Second World War.

Political scientist and self-described “military sociologist” Zoltan Barany argues it’s possible to predict how a general will respond to a domestic revolt if we know enough about the army, the state and society it serves, and the external environment.

But first, Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot talk about former Boko Haram kidnapping victims, and the expansion of NATO as the alliance invites the small Balkan nation of Montenegro to join.

In this Monday, Jan. 17. 2011 file photo protestors greet soldiers during a demonstration against former Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali in the center of Tunis.
Christophe Ena / AP

In February 2011, President Obama criticized the U.S. intelligence community for not accurately forecasting the unrest in Tunisia would spread to Egypt and other Middle East countries, sparking a region-wide Arab Spring, an unremitting civil war in Syria, and the rise of ISIS.

The president had harsh words for the Director of National Intelligence James Clapper about how quickly the forces in Tunisia turned against the authoritarian regime, The New York Times’ Mark Mazzetti wrote at the time:

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss new London mayor Sadiq Khan, and Germany's decision to rescind the conviction of 50,000 Germans convicted of homosexuality between 1949 and 1969.

Then, Suzette talks with anthropologist Laura Graham and filmmaker David Hernández-Palmar about their work with indigenous populations in South America.

David Hernández-Palmar

When anthropologist Laura Graham was working on her graduate research with the Xavante people in Brazil during the 1990s, she encountered a Catholic priest who inadvertently showed her the power of media.

“He came to the community, and he brought film of Xavante that had been filmed in another area,” Graham said. “And they were so excited to see this film. But he said, ‘You can watch this film after you watch a film of Jesus Christ and the Resurrection.’ So it was this kind of bribe. And that made a big impression on me.”

The Mayor of Berlin, Klaus Wowereit, right, and Holocaust survivor Rudolf Brazda, left, talk in front of a memorial for homosexual victims persecuted by the Nazi regime in Berlin, Germany, Friday, June 27, 2008.
Michael Sohn / AP

This week Germany rescinded about 50,000 convictions for homosexual behavior that occurred between 1949 and 1969. 

The law in question was actually repealed in 1994, but those convictions were never taken off the books, so this move marks a step toward demonstrating the country’s acceptance of sexual orientation.

Rebecca Cruise, the assistant dean of the University of Oklahoma’s College of International Studies, says timing becomes an issue 50-70 years later.

Then-candidate Sadiq Khan during a protest in Parliament Square against expansion at London's Heathrow Airport, October 10, 2015.
steven.eason / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

London’s new mayor Sadiq Khan formally took office Sunday. He’s the first Muslim mayor of London, and comes from a humble background. Born in England, he’s the son of Pakistani immigrants – his mother worked as a seamstress, and his father drove a bus.

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