World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

You can contact the show directly at worldviews@ou.edu, or follow the program on Twitter @worldviewsKGOU.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
51828ad7e1c89124f3970a4b|51828ad1e1c89124f3970a29

Pages

World Views
3:37 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

World Views: February 21, 2014

Listen to the entire February 21, 2014 episode.

Rebecca Cruise talks with University of Oklahoma political scientist Paul Goode about competing narratives in the Western and Russian media about what's happening in Ukraine, and why he thinks the crisis isn't likely to end soon despite Friday's agreement.

Later, Suzette Grillot's conversation with author Paul Bogard about the human, environmental, and economic consequences of artificially lighting the night sky. He's the author of The End of Night: Searching for Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light.

Read more
World Views
3:11 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

Despite Agreement To End Crisis, Ukraine Likely At Point Of No Return

A government protester stands on Hrushevskogo Street, Kiev, Ukraine
Credit Sasha Maksymenko / Flickr Creative Commons

Media across the world have expressed outrage and concern over violence in Ukraine. University of Oklahoma political scientist Paul Goode says competing narratives in the Western and Russian press don’t accurately capture what has been happening on the ground not just in Kiev, but throughout all of Ukraine.

“The Western media is very captured by the notion that this is a protest between Ukraine leaning towards Russia or leaning towards the EU,” Goode says. “It sort of fits within this Cold War-trope that has been persistent for the last 20 years.”

Read more
World Views
11:22 am
Wed February 19, 2014

Night Alight: Ramifications Of Using Artificial Illumination

The brightest areas of Earth are the most urbanized, but not necessarily the most populated (compare Western Europe with China and India). The United States Interstate Highway System appears as a lattice connecting the brighter dots of city centers.
Craig Mayhew and Robert Simmon NASA GSFC

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with author Paul Bogard.

Growing up in northern Minnesota, Paul Bogard grew to love the darkness as he watched the Milky Way at night. Moved by these early experiences and motivated to understand the consequences of artificial light pollution, Bogard explores the human, environmental, and economic consequences of artificially lighting the night sky in his book The End of Night: Searching for Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light.

Read more
World Views
4:30 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

World Views: February 14, 2014

Listen to the entire February 14, 2013 episode.

Suzette Grillot hosts the program from Puebla, Mexico, and shares her thoughts on the colonial city with University of Oklahoma Spanish literature historian Luis Cortest.

Later, a conversation with Pakistan analysts and scholars Joshua White and Shamyla Chaudry about how the country's burgeoning, educated youth population and how various religious and militant groups pose distinct policy concerns for the South Asian nuclear power and the United States.

Read more
World Views
3:57 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

SLIDESHOW: On The Road - Investment In Economy And Education Provides Positive Outlook For Mexico

The 17th Century Church of San Cristobal in Puebla, Mexico
Suzette Grillot KGOU

Mexican authorities’ ongoing struggle with drug cartels continues. University of Oklahoma Spanish literature historian Luis Cortest says ongoing drug traffic-related violence would continue to be a problem until government policy changes.

“It is possible for places to change, for countries to change, for cities to change,” Cortest says. “The best example in Latin America is Colombia.” 

Read more
World Views
11:17 am
Thu February 13, 2014

U.S.-Pakistan Relations: Challenges And Opportunities With Pakistan’s Diversity

Pakistani boys unload food from a U.S. Army helicopter. Pakistan needs the United States "for a whole host of support," says Lahore School of Economics professor Shamyla Chaudry.
Credit Spc. Stephen J. Schmitz / U.S. Army / Flickr Creative Commons

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Joshua White and Shamyla Chaudry.

Pakistan’s burgeoning, educated youth population and various religious and militant groups pose distinct policy concerns for the South Asian nuclear power and the United States, say analysts and scholars Joshua White and Shamyla Chaudry.

Read more
World Views
2:22 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

World Views: February 7, 2014

Listen to the entire February 7, 2014 episode.

Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis discuss the ongoing conflict in Central African Republic, and why it seems reminiscent of the 1994 Rwandan genocide.

Later, a conversation with Iranian-American filmmaker Farzin Rezaeian. His documentary Iran: Seven Faces of a Civilization explores 7,000 years of history in his home country.

Read more
World Views
2:09 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

Reminders Of The Rwandan Genocide In France And Central African Republic

In 1994, 800,000 people were killed in 100 days of systematic slaughter. Many sites around Rwanda now stand as memorials to the genocide. Here, people's personal items are collected. Glasses, pens, rosaries, collected from those who were killed.
Credit configmanager / Flickr Creative Commons

Correction: An earlier version of this article misidentified Rwanda as a former French colony.

During the Rwandan genocide, many suspected war criminals fled to Europe seeking safe haven, but now nearly two decades later, 2014 marks France’s first opening of a trial over the African country’s genocide.

The opened trials may not reveal much new about the systematic killing of ethnic Tutsis and Hutu moderated by radical Hutus in 1994. Books on the genocide have been written, rivers of tears shed, and documentary films made. A U.N. war crimes tribunal and other courts have already sent dozens to prison — some for life.

Read more
World Views
1:58 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

Tenuous Order Threatens Central African Republic’s Stability

Burundi peacekeeping forces arrive in Central African Republic in December 2013 to work toward CAR security.
Credit Staff Sgt. Erik Cardenas, USAF / US Army Africa / Flickr Creative Commons

Continued conflict in Central African Republic is troubling world leaders and international peacekeepers. Six thousand African peacekeepers have been deployed to try to control the chaos that has enveloped Central African Republic, alongside 1,600 French soldiers.

Peacekeeping forces, however, have failed to stop killings and violence between Christian majority and Muslim minority groups in the country. Multiple reports cite murders occurring in the presence of peacekeeping forces.

Read more
World Views
11:27 am
Thu February 6, 2014

The Forgotten Empire: Documentary Filmmaker Shares Lessons From Iranian History

The Cyrus Cylinder maintains a record of Cyrus the Great's religious and political tolerance.
Credit Pleia2 / Flickr Creative Commons

Iranian documentary filmmaker Farzin Rezaeian says Greek, Roman, and European history have overshadowed ancient Iranian history, yet there are valuable lessons from Iran’s past for today’s world.

“The idea of international law, the beginning of human rights as it’s first mentioned in the Cyrus Cylinder… this goes back to some 2,500 years ago, five hundred years before Jesus Christ was even born” Rezaeian says. “Unfortunately, we don’t hear about it.”

Read more

Pages