World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

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On the first episode of KGOU’s World Views this year, Suzette Grillot, Rebecca Cruise, and Joshua Landis look ahead to 2015 and some of the biggest international stories they expect to follow in the coming months.

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Flickr

Despite record-setting job creation, and the U.S. stock market's value tripling since 2009, the global economy ends the year on a sour note due to the currency crisis in Russia and plateauing growth in China.

"Europe has languished, and Japan has really swooned. Inflation fell everywhere thanks to oil prices going down," says KGOU's World Views contributor Joshua Landis.

Landis says there are dark clouds on the horizon, especially in East Asia and Europe.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss day-after-Christmas traditions around the world, and Joshua Landis provides an update on how economies around the world have fared during 2014.

Then, a conversation with photojournalist and activist Paula Allen. For a quarter century, she has chronicled the stories of these women during and after the search for their missing family members. She published her photos in the book Flowers in the Desert.

Shoppers lining up at the Chadstone Shopping Centre just outside Melbourne, Australia - December 26, 2007.
avlxyz / Flickr

The United Kingdom and many Commonwealth countries typically celebrate Boxing Day every December 26. The tradition of giving servants and tradespeople a "Christmas box" of food and gifts from their employers dates back to the Middle Ages.

In South Africa, the holiday was officially renamed the Day of Goodwill in 1994. But in other European countries, December 26 is celebrated as "Second Christmas Day" - an entirely different holiday.

Grimilda Sanchez (October 1990) installing the sign that indicates the location of the mass grave that was discovered 15 kilometers from Calama on July 19, 1990
Paula Allen

On Christmas Day in 1989, photographer Paula Allen took a 26-hour bus ride to the remote city of Calama in northern Chile, and walked into one of the most hostile deserts on Earth. The half-dozen women she traveled with spread hundreds of red carnations across the floor of the Atacama Desert to honor 26 men likely buried beneath the sand.

The Jewish Star of David, Arab- Christian Cross and Crescent on the front of Beit Hagefen Arab-Jewish Center in Haifa.
zeevveez / Flickr

What makes religion turn violent?

That’s the question Charles Kimball is trying to answer.

An ordained Baptist minister with a Th.D. in comparative religion from Harvard, Kimball has studied the intersection of Christianity, Judaism, and Islam for four decades. He’s made more than three dozen trips to the Middle East, worked closely with Congress, the White House, and the U.S. State Department as an analyst of Jewish-Christian-Muslim relations and of the intersection of religion and politics in the United States.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the announcement this week by President Obama that the United States would work to normalize relations with Cuba, and North Korea's hacking of Sony in response to the film The Interview.

Then Suzette talks with Charles Kimball, the director of the religious studies program at the University of Oklahoma. He's the author of the books When Religion Becomes Evil and When Religion Becomes Lethal.

Joshua Landis, Rebecca Cruise, and Suzette Grillot  discuss the release of the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence report on the CIA's detention and interrogation practices.

Then Rebecca talks with photojournalist and filmmaker Mimi Chakarova, whose film The Price of Sex personalizes East European human trafficking.

U.S. Army Military Police escort a detainee to his cell in Camp X-Ray at Naval Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, during in-processing to the temporary detention facility on Jan. 11, 2002.
Photographers Mate 1st Class Shane T. McCoy / U.S. Department of Defense

On Tuesday the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence released a 525-page report detailing the use of enhanced interrogation techniques against detainees in the wake of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. This so-called torture report describes the CIA’s extensive waterboarding, rectal feeding, and up to 180 hours of forced sleep deprivation.

Two Moldovan women await their ride in front of the shelter for trafficked girls in 2004.
Mimi Chakarova

Over the 25 years since photographer and filmmaker Mimi Chakarova moved with her family from Bulgaria to Baltimore in 1989, she never lost touch with her East European roots. She’s spent the past decade chronicling stories of women from her native region sold into the sex trade in the Middle East and Western Europe.

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