World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

Ways to Connect

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the potential for a peace agreement between the Colombian government and the FARC rebel group, and the expanding U.S. and NATO military presence in central and eastern Europe.

Then, Suzette talks with Laura DeNardis. She’s an expert the global dynamics of internet governance, and we’ll talk about the development of the Domain Name System, or DNS, and the management of IP addresses.

dark keyboard and mouse
Michael Schreifels / Flickr

Cars, drones, refrigerators – almost everything is connected to the internet in some way, and that raises significant questions about control and governance. Who’s in charge, and who sets standards?

American University communications professor Laura DeNardis has studied these issues since the modern internet’s infancy in the 1990s. She told KGOU’s World Views countries, industry, and civil society work together in what she called “multi-stakeholder governance.”

Rebecca Cruise and Brian Hardzinski discuss Taiwan’s election of its first female president, and the outgoing leader’s visit to a small group of islands in the South China Sea. Both issues are causing problems with mainland China.

Then, a conversation with New York University historian Edward Berenson about the evolution of French jazz music during World War I and World War II, Josephine Baker, and the symbolism of the Statue of Liberty.

Taiwan's president-elect Tsai Ing-wen
CSIS | Center for Strategic & International Studies / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Earlier this month Taiwan elected its first female president in a historic general election that also saw a party other than the Kuomintang, or KMT, take over for only the second time since the Chinese Nationalists were driven from the mainland to the island by the Chinese Communists following the 1949 civil war.

President-elect Tsai Ing-wen leads the Democratic Progressive Party, or DPP. Historically, they've been a pro-Independence party, seeking to establish Taiwan as a truly unique nation rather than a state-in-exile.

Craftsmen in Paris work on the construction of the Statue of Liberty.
National Park Service

In 1777, a 19-year-old French aristocrat arrived on the eastern shores of an infant nation and forever changed the course of United States history. Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette received a commission as a major general in the Continental Army, and played a key military role in battles at Brandywine, in Rhode Island, and at the eventual British surrender at Yorktown. His participation in the American Revolution entrenched France’s status as the oldest U.S. ally.

The U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom monitors the right to thought, conscience, and individual expression around the world. Suzette Grillot talks about some of their work with the agency's acting co-director of policy and research Elizabeth Cassidy.

But first, Rebecca Cruise talks with Joshua Landis about how the continued decline in oil prices is affecting international markets., and the upcoming meetings on Syria.

Afghan women at a polling location during 2010 parliamentary elections.
UK Ministry of Defense / Open Governement License

In 1998, President Clinton signed the International Religious Freedom Act, which codified religious freedom as an official foreign policy goal of the United States, and established the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, or USCIRF.

Uppala University anthropologist Don Kulick.
Drew Reynolds / University of Chicago Magazine

It’s probably not something most people think about on a daily basis, but people with severe intellectual or physical disabilities often have the same sexual needs and desires as the able-bodied.

Joshua Landis and Rebecca Cruise react to President Obama’s State of the Union address, the release of U.S. sailors from Iranian custody, and Turkey’s response to a terrorist attack in Istanbul.

Then, Brian Hardzinski talks with anthropologist Don Kulick. Even though there are countless public services available in Sweden and Denmark for people with disabilities, that’s not the case with their private sexual lives.

Two riverine command boats like this one were taken into custody by Iran, along with 10 U.S. sailors.
MC2 Ecklund / U.S. Navy

Earlier this week Turkey attacked Islamic State forces in Iraq and Syria after a suicide bombing in Istanbul that killed 10 tourists. Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan says the tank and artillery attack killed nearly 200 militants.

Pages