World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

You can contact the show directly at worldviews@ou.edu, or follow the program on Twitter @worldviewsKGOU.

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World Views
11:54 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Despite Failures, Latin America Still Fond Of JFK

U.S. President John F. Kennedy at La Morita, Venezuela, during an official meeting for the Alliance for Progress in 1961.
Credit Historia de Venezuela en Imágenes, El Nacional, 2001 / Wikimedia Commons

When President Kennedy took office in 1961, he immediately set out to combat communism wherever he could.

He didn’t need to look far, and signed off on a plan to overthrow Cuban dictator Fidel Castro put in motion by his predecessor, Dwight D. Eisenhower.

University of Oklahoma political scientist and Latin America scholar Charles Kenney says it’s no coincidence Kennedy launched the disastrous Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba within a month of a massive ten-year development program for Latin America known as the Alliance For Progress.

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World Views
2:06 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

'Roadmap Of Peace': Modern Lessons From Mali’s Ancient Manuscripts

Astronomy and mathematics tables on a page from a Timbuktu manuscript.
Credit EurAstro / Wikimedia Commons

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Michael Covitt.

For hundreds of years, thousands of manuscripts have been preserved in Timbuktu, chronicling a period from the 12th to 16th Centuries when Mali was the wealthiest nation on Earth.

Michael Covitt is the founder of the Malian Manuscript Foundation, and the producer of the documentary 333 – named after the saints buried in Timbuktu.

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

World Views: November 15, 2013

Listen to the entire November 15, 2013 episode.

A little over a week ago, Typhoon Haiyan slammed into the Philippines, leaving thousands dead and devastating the city of Tacloban. Suzette Grillot also talks with Joshua Landis about a so-called "wild card" in Syria's civil war - private funding by wealthy donors.

Later, Adriana Beltrán from the Washington Office on Latin America joins Suzette Grillot to discuss how clandestine criminal organizations infiltrate Guatemala’s judicial system.

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World Views
1:44 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

How Kuwait And Saudi Arabia Are Becoming A ‘Virtual Western Union’ For Syria’s Rebels

A man displays part of a mortar launched by the Syrian Army that destroyed the house behind him in al-Qsair - February 9, 2012
Credit Freedom House / Flickr Creative Commons

Private donors have contributed tens of millions of dollars to Islamist militias in Syria, dividing the opposition even further and forcing the United States to reexamine who it backs in the region.

The New York Times reports the practice is adding a “wild card” to the war in Syria.

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World Views
10:43 am
Fri November 15, 2013

How The Typhoon In The Philippines Could Be A Diplomatic Teaching Moment

Marines and U.S. Army Soldiers load supplies onto an MV-22 Osprey assigned to assist the Philippine government in response to the aftermath of Super Typhoon Haiyan - November 14, 2013.
Credit Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ricardo R. Guzman / U.S. Navy

Thousands have died, and millions more have been affected by Typhoon Haiyan’s landfall in the Philippines earlier this month, and significant aid has poured in from the United States, Australia and Japan.

But paltry support for the Philippines from its neighbor China could negatively affect that country’s image on the diplomatic stage.

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World Views
11:27 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Changing Guatemala's Decades-Old Culture Of Corruption

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton meets Guatemala Attorney General Claudia Paz y Paz - June 22, 2011.
Credit U.S. Embassy Guatemala / Flickr Creative Commons

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Adriana Beltrán.

Guatemala signed peace accords in 1996 to end a decades-long civil war. But even though the fighting came to an end, institutional democratic reforms never took place.

The government consolidated power through corrupt relationships with organized crime and a lack of accountability over the next two decades. 

“A very popular phrase is ‘hidden powers’,” says Adriana Beltrán, a Senior Associate for Citizen Security at the Washington Office on Latin America, and the author of a study of the same name. “Established institutions like the judicial sector, the police… they’ll use them to prevent any kind of conviction when it comes to human rights cases to protect in case of criminal wrongdoing.”

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

World Views: November 8, 2013

Listen to the entire November 8, 2013 episode.

Earlier this week anti-American protests in Iran marked 34 years since the storming of the Embassy in Tehran, and the start of the 18-month hostage crisis. Suzette Grillot talks about the anniversary with Joshua Landis, who also provides a brief update on Saudi Arabia's frustration with the U.S. over Syria.

Later, a conversation with Boston University modern European historian Jonathan Zatlin. He says parts of Europe's debt crisis can be explained by religious tension between the Protestant North and the Catholic South.

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World Views
11:49 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Two Things To Know About The Middle East This Week

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks with U.S. Ambassador to Israel Daniel Shapiro, U.S. Special Envoy for Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations Martin Indyk, and Deputy Special Envoy Frank Lowenstein about Middle East peace negotiations before departing Ben Gurion International Airport in Tel Aviv, Israel, en route to Geneva, Switzerland, on November 8, 2013.
Credit U.S. Department of State / Flickr Creative Commons

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with "World Views" contributor Joshua Landis.

Four world powers are dispatching their top diplomats to Geneva on Friday to add their weight to negotiations aimed at putting initial limits on Iran's ability to make atomic weapons.

The meeting comes shortly after the 34th anniversary of the start of the Iran hostage crisis, and the end of diplomatic relations between the United States and the Islamic Republic.

Joshua Landis, the Director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma, says the election of Hassan Rouhani earlier this year marks a crossroads as the moderate leader tries to promote understanding with the United States.

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World Views
12:14 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Economic Lessons Europe Learned (Or Didn’t Learn) During The 20th Century

People walk past the former barrier between East and West Berlin after the Fall of Berlin Wall in November 1989.
Credit Raphaël Thiémard / Flickr Creative Commons

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Boston University historian Jonathan Zatlin.

Allied powers divided war-torn Germany into four zones of occupation after World War II, with three of those zones uniting in 1949 to form what became known as West Germany.

The Soviet Union controlled the fourth zone, and East Germany remained within the Eastern Bloc’s sphere of influence for the next four decades.

Boston University modern European historian Jonathan Zatlin says the divided nation served as a tripwire for all the tensions of the Cold War, and that Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin worried a united Germany posed a security risk.

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri November 1, 2013

World Views: November 1, 2013

Listen to the entire November 1, 2013 episode.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the implications of the Roma child found living with a couple in Greece, and the October 26 protest by Saudi women in defiance of the country's traditions against driving.

Later, a conversation about water and sanitation in Africa with the University of Oklahoma 2013 International Water Prize winner Ada Oko-Williams, and University College London hydrogeologist Richard Taylor.

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