World Views

Fridays 4-4:30 p.m., 6:30-7 p.m. and Saturdays 6-6:30 a.m.

World Views is hosted by Suzette Grillot, Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, with regular analysis from Joshua Landis, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at OU, and Rebecca Cruise, the College's Assistant Dean and a security studies and a comparative politics expert. Each week's show focuses on specific global topics in a roundtable discussion, followed by in-depth interviews with experts and news makers.

You can contact the show directly at worldviews@ou.edu, or follow the program on Twitter @worldviewsKGOU.

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World Views
11:02 am
Fri December 13, 2013

Time’s ‘Person Of The Year’ Reinforces Sea Change In Papacy And Catholic Church

Credit Time.com

In only his first year, Pope Francis was selected by Time magazine's editors as the person who had the greatest impact on the world, for good or bad, during 2013.

Time Managing Editor Nancy Gibbs said Pope Francis had changed the tone, the perception and focus of one of the world's largest institutions in an extraordinary way.

Rebecca Cruise, the Assistant Dean of the University of Oklahoma’s College of International Studies, tells KGOU’s World Views host Suzette Grillot the enthusiasm created by Pope Francis is palpable.

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

World Views: December 6, 2013

Listen to the entire December 6, 2013 episode.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss China 's move to grab airspace over the East China Sea, and ongoing protests in Ukraine over a jailed political leader, and a scuttled trade pact with the European Union.

The Dallas Morning News Mexico Bureau Chief Alfredo Corchado joins Grillot to talk about his 20-year career. His memoir Midnight in Mexico chronicles his coverage of the country’s war against the drug cartels.

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World Views
2:30 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

Ukraine Protests Continue, Resolution Elusive

Thousands of Ukrainians protest the scrapping of a trade pact with the European Union on the streets of Kiev - November 24, 2013.
Credit Ryan Anderson / Flickr Creative Commons

Thousands of people have gathered in Kiev's Independence Square over the past two weeks, where Orthodox priests chanted prayers at dawn and demonstrators are vowing to keep up their protests.

The government is showing no signs of yielding, suggesting that the tensions that have gripped the country for two weeks are far from a resolution.

Rebecca Cruise, the Assistant Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, says the protests are about two things: The jailed opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko, and the president’s decision not to sign agreements with the European Union that would bring them closer to Europe, both economically and politically.

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World Views
11:29 am
Fri December 6, 2013

China Resolved To Enforce Air Defense Zone

Vice President Joe Biden shakes hands with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe after their meeting in Tokyo, Japan, on Tuesday.
Credit William Ng / U.S. Department of State

China says it is fully capable of enforcing its newly-declared maritime air defense zone above disputed islands in the East China Sea that has drawn strong denunciations from the U.S., Japan and other nations.

“They're [the islands] not all that impressive, but they happen to be on top of what looks like oil reserves or natural gas,” says Rebecca Cruise, the Assistant Dean of the University of Oklahoma’s College of International Studies. “There are a lot of people in this part of the world that are needing energy, and the demand there rises, so this becomes about resources, and about power.”

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World Views
7:34 am
Wed December 4, 2013

Reporting Mexico’s Drug War From Oaxaca To Oklahoma

Reporter and author Alfredo Corchado covers a political rally in the border city of Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, in 1986.
Credit Billy Calzada

Alfredo Corchado has spent nearly 20 years covering his native country as the Mexico bureau chief for The Dallas Morning News.

From first reporting on government protests in Ciudad Juárez in the mid-80s, through five presidential administrations and a violent drug war with no end in sight, he says he’s always left with the fact that it’s not enough.

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

World Views: November 29, 2013

Listen to the entire November 29, 2013 episode.

Earlier this week a six-month deal was reached to curb Iran’s nuclear program in exchange for lighter economic sanctions. Rebecca Cruise joins Suzette Grillot to talk about the reaction among Saudis, Israelis, Americans, and Europeans.

Later, a conversation with LaNelma Johnson, whose Bahá’í faith led her and her family to India in 1971, where they taught children ages five to 18 at a small, rural school in Panchgani. Johnson told the story of her family’s 12 years in India in her memoir Okie in a Saree.

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World Views
3:34 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

Breaking Down India’s Caste System Through Education

LaNelma Johnson stands with villagers in Panchgani, India
Provided LaNelma Johnson

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with LaNelma Johnson.

Forty-five years ago, LaNelma and Ray Johnson accepted the Bahá’í faith, and its tenet to serve humanity and the oneness of mankind. That desire took them to India in 1971, where they taught children ages five to 18 at a small, rural school in Panchgani.

“Some of the children were there because they were orphans, and some were there because they came from war-torn countries,” LaNelma Johnson says. “We really felt like we could do a service there with these children.”

Johnson told the story of her family’s 12 years in India in her memoir Okie in a Saree. The couple set out to consciously recruit female students from all over India, since they weren’t afforded the same educational opportunities as boys. India’s caste system had already been illegal for decades, but reforms were slow to trickle down to rural villages.

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

World Views: November 22, 2013

Listen to the entire November 22, 2013 episode.

Friday marks 50 years since President John F. Kennedy died by an assassin’s hand in Dallas. University of Oklahoma political scientist Charles Kenney joins Suzette Grillot to discuss Kennedy’s global legacy, especially in Latin America.

Later, a conversation with Michael Covitt, the founder of the Malian Manuscript Foundation, and the producer of the documentary 333 – named after the saints buried in Timbuktu.

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World Views
11:54 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Despite Failures, Latin America Still Fond Of JFK

U.S. President John F. Kennedy at La Morita, Venezuela, during an official meeting for the Alliance for Progress in 1961.
Credit Historia de Venezuela en Imágenes, El Nacional, 2001 / Wikimedia Commons

When President Kennedy took office in 1961, he immediately set out to combat communism wherever he could.

He didn’t need to look far, and signed off on a plan to overthrow Cuban dictator Fidel Castro put in motion by his predecessor, Dwight D. Eisenhower.

University of Oklahoma political scientist and Latin America scholar Charles Kenney says it’s no coincidence Kennedy launched the disastrous Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba within a month of a massive ten-year development program for Latin America known as the Alliance For Progress.

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World Views
2:06 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

'Roadmap Of Peace': Modern Lessons From Mali’s Ancient Manuscripts

Astronomy and mathematics tables on a page from a Timbuktu manuscript.
Credit EurAstro / Wikimedia Commons

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Michael Covitt.

For hundreds of years, thousands of manuscripts have been preserved in Timbuktu, chronicling a period from the 12th to 16th Centuries when Mali was the wealthiest nation on Earth.

Michael Covitt is the founder of the Malian Manuscript Foundation, and the producer of the documentary 333 – named after the saints buried in Timbuktu.

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