Kenya

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the foreign policy implications of the partial federal government shutdown, and the lingering effects of last month's mall shooting in Nairobi on Kenya's tourism industry and political stability.

Later, Suzette talks with Reggie Whitten, the founder of the Oklahoma City-based charity Pros for Africa. His foundation works closely with Sister Rosemary Nyirumbe, a nun from Uganda who operates a school for children affected by Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army.

Anne Knight / Wikimedia Commons

Weeks after the attack on the Westgate shopping mall in Nairobi that killed dozens of people, analysts are starting to make sense of the attack by the al-Shabaab Islamist group.

“Al-Shabaab has claimed this is in retaliation for Kenyan forces being in Somalia,” says Rebecca Cruise, the Assistant Dean of the University of Oklahoma’s College of International Studies. “Kenya can expect to see more unless they change their policies.”

(We're adding to the top of this post as news comes in, and also posting updates here.)

One day after panic and confusion took over a shopping mall in Nairobi, survivors' accounts and photographs provide a close-up perspective of the scene. Their stories have given new detail to the chaos that erupted after attackers used grenades and guns to begin a standoff that lasted into Sunday.

Updated Sunday 5:46 a.m. ET


The death toll at an upscale shopping mall in Nairobi has increased to at least 52, and civilians are still inside as militants exchange sporadic barrages of gunfire with Kenyan security troops outside.

"The priority is to save as many lives as possible," Joseph Lenku, Kenya's Interior cabinet secretary told AP early today. Kenyan forces have already rescued about 1,000 people, he said.

He said that five to 15 attackers are involved in the standoff, but declined to estimate the number of hostages.

Satellite imagery and seismic data have identified two huge underground aquifers in Kenya's drought-prone north, a discovery that could be "a game changer" for the country, NPR's Gregory Warner reports.

The aquifers, located hundreds of feet underground in the Turkana region that borders Ethiopia and South Sudan, contain billions of gallons of water, according to UNESCO, which confirmed the existence of the subterranean lakes discovered with the help of a French company using technology originally designed to reveal oil deposits.