Taliban

The Two-Way
9:18 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Taliban Attack Frees At Least 175 From Pakistani Prison

Pakistani policemen stand outside the central prison after an overnight attack in Dera Ismail Khan. Officials say Taliban insurgents freed hundreds of prisoners, including hard-line militants.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 10:25 am

Scores of prisoners were freed from a prison in northwestern Pakistan on Tuesday, after Taliban militants armed with explosives and automatic weapons reportedly stormed the facility. At least nine people, including five guards, died in gun battles and other violence at the prison, according to multiple news outlets.

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri July 19, 2013

World Views: July 19, 2013

Listen to the entire July 19, 2013 episode.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the cargo ship stopped in Panama on its way to North Korea with missiles and fighter jets on board, and Pakistani women’s education activist Malala Yousafzai’s speech before the United Nations.

Sanam Naraghi-Anderlini, the co-founder of the International Civil Society Action Network (ICAN), joins Grillot and Cruise for a conversation about gender and security in the 13 years since the adoption of UN Security Council Resolution 1325.

World Views
1:55 pm
Fri July 19, 2013

VIDEO: How A Taliban Attack Further Inspired Pakistani Education Activist

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (right) meets with Malala Yousafzai (center) on July 12, 2013. The Secretary-General presented her with a leather-bound copy of the United Nations Charter, which normally is given only to heads of state.
Credit Eskinder Debebe / UN Photo

Earlier this week Pakistani Taliban commander Adnan Rasheed wrote a letter to 16-year-old women’s education activist Malala Yousafzai saying he wished the October 2012 attack on her life hadn’t happened.

The letter came shortly after Yousafzai’s July 12 speech before the United Nations, where she said the attack gave her a renewed sense of strength, power and courage.

“The attack on her was not in response to her support for girls' education, but because she was critical of the Taliban,” says Suzette Grillot, the Dean of the University of Oklahoma’s College of International Studies. “He encourages her to come back to Pakistan and pick up her pen in the name of Islam.”

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