KGOU

2017 Oklahoma Legislative Session

Gov. Mary  Fallin vetoed most of the state's revised budget bill on Friday, November 17, 2017.
Governor Mary Fallin's office

Citing a failure to address several of her requests when she called a special session of the state legislature and the use of one-time funds, Gov. Mary Fallin vetoed the vast majority of a budget bill Friday evening.

Oklahoma is facing a budget gap of $215 million, and social services and schools are already feeling the impact. State lawmakers are six weeks into a special session on what to do about it.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with KGOU’s Jacob McCleland (@jacobmccleland).

Speaker of the Oklahoma House Charles McCall, R-Atoka, speaks at a news conference to announce a state budget deal on October 23, 2017.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Democrats in the Oklahoma House voted down a GOP-backed package that would have increased taxes on cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, low point beer and fuel on a tense day at the state capitol.

The plan would have also given a pay raise to teachers and some state employees.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin and Speaker of the House Charles McCall (left) announce a budget proposal on Oct. 23, 2017.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Five weeks after calling a special session, Gov. Mary Fallin announced Monday that Republicans in the state House and Senate have reached a budget deal to fill a $215 million shortfall.

Oklahoma State Capitol Building
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

Three agencies that serve many of the state’s most vulnerable residents are facing additional budget cuts. The Office of Management and Enterprise Services (OMES) has notified the Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA), Oklahoma Department of Human Services (OKDHS) and Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) they must make cuts to fill the state’s $215 million budget hole. 

InSapphoWeTrust / Flickr

The Oklahoma state Supreme Court ruled Thursday a sales tax on motor vehicles is constitutional.

Oklahoma Supreme Court chambers
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

 


Following the 2017 Oklahoma Legislative Session, several lawsuits have emerged challenging the constitutionality of revenue raising measures. Laws in question include the $1.50 cigarette fee, 1.25 percent sales tax increase on vehicles, among others.

An attorney who successfully argued against the constitutionality of a 2010 health care fee says the current lawsuits have similarities to the case he won seven years ago.

 

cigarettes
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Following the 2017 Oklahoma Legislative Session, several lawsuits have emerged challenging the constitutionality of revenue raising measures. Laws in question include the $1.50 cigarette fee, 1.25 percent sales tax increase on vehicles, among others.

 

An attorney who successfully argued against the constitutionality of a 2010 health care fee says the current lawsuits have similarities to the case he won seven years ago.