abortion

Legislation prohibiting abortions where doctors use clamps, forceps or similar instruments to dismember a fetus in the womb has been approved by an Oklahoma Senate committee.

The Committee on Health and Human Services voted 7-1 Monday for the House-passed measure. The bill, which has been proposed in several states by a national anti-abortion group, now goes to the full Senate.

The measure by Republican Sen. Josh Brecheen of Coalgate would ban procedures in which doctors use medical devices to dismember a fetus in the womb to complete an abortion.

State Representative Pam Peterson
okhouse.gov

The Oklahoma House has passed a bill that would prohibit abortions in which doctors use clamps, forceps or similar instruments to dismember a fetus in the womb.

House members voted 84-2 on Thursday. The bill, being pushed in several states by a national anti-abortion group, now goes to the Senate.

Republican Rep. Pam Peterson of Tulsa sponsored the bill that would outlaw procedures in which doctors use medical devices to dismember a fetus in the womb to complete an abortion.

ocrj.org

Members of a group formed to push back against many of the anti-abortion measures in the Oklahoma Legislature every year will be donning pink and heading to the Capitol in support of women's reproductive rights.

The Oklahoma Coalition for Reproductive Justice will host "Pink Wave 2015" on Tuesday at the Capitol. The event will include speakers, informational displays and coalition members lobbying their individual legislators.

Two anti-abortion measures have been approved in the Oklahoma House.

The House Public Health Committee on Wednesday approved the "Oklahoma Unborn Child Protection from Dismemberment Abortion Act," which would outlaw certain late-term abortions. The bill provides an exception in cases where the abortion was necessary to prevent a serious health risk to the mother. It now heads to the full House.

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt prepares to greet Gov. Mary Fallin at the 2013 State of the State address at the state capitol.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

While Oklahoma's Attorney General, Scott Pruitt, is fighting in court to defend two anti-abortion bills passed by the Legislature last year, state lawmakers have introduced several new abortion bills for the 2015 session.

Among those filed this year are measures to prohibit certain late-term abortions, require doctors to inform pregnant women about the fetal heartbeat, and require women to have certain information provided to them at least three days before an abortion. A related bill would make it a felony to perform research using stem cells.

Ben Ramsey / Flickr Creative Commons

The Oklahoma Supreme Court put two laws on hold Tuesday that place restrictions on abortions in the state.

One law requires abortion providers have a physician with admitting privileges at a nearby hospital present when the procedure is performed, and would’ve forced the doctor who performs nearly half of the state’s abortions to shut down his practice.

Attorneys for a Norman abortion provider say he'll have to close his practice next week unless the Oklahoma Supreme Court blocks a law that takes effect Saturday. The new law requires abortion providers to have a physician with admitting privileges at a nearby hospital present when abortions are performed.

Attorneys for the New York-based Center for Reproductive Rights told a Supreme Court referee Friday that Dr. Larry Burns has sought admitting privileges at several hospitals but has been denied. Burns performs 44 percent of all abortions in the state.

The Oklahoma Supreme Court has been asked to prevent a new law that restricts the use of certain abortion-inducing drugs from taking effect.

The New York-based Center for Reproductive Rights filed an emergency motion late Wednesday to block the law from taking effect as scheduled on Saturday. The group filed the motion after an Oklahoma County district judge rejected its request to prevent the law from taking effect. The state's highest court did not immediately schedule a hearing on the request.

Oklahoma County District Judge Bill Graves
Oklahoma County

Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly reported the last year that Bill Graves served in the Legislature. He served from 1989 to 2004.

The judge who ruled against a Norman doctor challenging a state law restricting abortions authored more than a dozen pieces of anti-abortion legislation when he was a state representative, legislative records show.

In 2001, when he was a Republican state legislator in northwest Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County District Judge Bill Graves wrote that abortion caused more carnage than Nazi Germany.

Last week, Graves ruled against a challenge to a new state law that required doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital.

Norman physician Dr. Larry Burns filed the lawsuit. Burns said the law, set to go into effect on Nov. 1, would force him to shut down his practice. Burns said he applied for admitting privileges at more than a dozen hospitals but was refused.

Graves ruled against Burns, saying Burns didn't file his request for admitting privileges on a timely basis.

Tom Hart / Flickr.com

A judge has ruled that Oklahoma can require doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital under a law that takes effect Nov. 1.

Oklahoma County District Judge Bill Graves ruled Friday against a legal challenge on behalf of a Norman clinic that performs nearly half of the abortions in the state.

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