abortion

Avinash Bhat / Flickr.com

An Oklahoma doctor is suing in hopes of blocking a new law that imposes stricter regulations on abortion providers.

The Center for Reproductive Rights filed the lawsuit Thursday on behalf of Dr. Larry Burns, who the center says performs nearly half the state's abortions.

The lawsuit aims to block a law that would require clinics to have a physician with admitting privileges at a nearby hospital present when an abortion is performed. It would take effect Nov. 1.

A similar law is being challenged in Texas.

Dr. Willie Parker is one of two doctors who performs abortions at the only women’s health clinic in Mississippi where abortions are performed.

Parker is a devout Christian who feels he is doing the right thing to help women in need. He’s the subject of a profile in Esquire magazine called “The Abortion Ministry of Dr. Willie Parker.”

Planned Parenthood of the Heartland says two of Oklahoma's three abortion providers could be shut down under a bill signed into law last week by Gov. Mary Fallin. The measure takes effect November 1.

The new law requires clinics to have a physician with admitting privileges at a nearby hospital present when an abortion if performed.  Planned parenthood says Reproduction Services in Tulsa is the only abortion provider in the state that meets the requirement.

Planned Parenthood staff attorney Tamya Cox tells the Tulsa World that abortion providers in Oklahoma City and Norman don't currently have admitting privileges at hospitals within 30 miles, as required under the new law.

  A bill that would impose strict new state regulations on abortion providers in Oklahoma is heading to the governor's desk.

In the waning minutes of the legislative session Friday, the House gave final approval to a bill that requires the Oklahoma Board of Health to establish standards regarding equipment and supplies that might be needed in a medical emergency. Abortion clinics would also be required to have a physician with admitting privileges at a nearby hospital present when an abortion is performed.

Ben Ramsey / Flickr Creative Commons

Gov. Mary Fallin has signed an anti-abortion measure that requires caregivers to notify women that perinatal hospice services are available as an alternative to abortion.

The bill was among two dozen measures Fallin signed into law on Monday. Other measures targeted the state's income tax, food stamp fraud, mental health courts and competitive bidding, among other things.

Serge Melki / Flickr.com

A bill that would restrict the use of abortion-inducing drugs in Oklahoma has easily passed the state Senate.

The Senate voted 37-5 Tuesday for the bill that was written in direct response to a state Supreme Court decision that tossed a similar measure approved by the Legislature in 2011.

The bill would prohibit off-label uses of certain abortion-inducing drugs by requiring doctors to administer the drugs only in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration protocol.

Cory Doctorow / Flickr.com

A bill to further restrict the use of abortion-inducing drugs in Oklahoma has easily cleared a Republican-controlled Senate committee.

The Senate Committee on Health and Human Services voted 5-1 Monday for the bill, which was written in direct response to a recent state Supreme Court decision.

bjmccray / Flickr.com

The Oklahoma House has approved legislation requiring abortion providers to have clinical privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of their practice.

The House voted 73-9 for the measure Thursday and sent it to the Senate for consideration. It is one of several anti-abortion measures filed in the 2014 Oklahoma Legislature.

The measure author, Republican Rep. Mike Ritze of Broken Arrow, says it is designed to protect unborn children and women who may develop medical complications during an abortion.

Ben Ramsey / Flickr Creative Commons

A bill to impose strict new state regulations and requirements for abortion providers in Oklahoma has cleared a Senate panel.

The Senate Appropriations Committee voted 19-2 on Wednesday for the bill by Edmond Republican state Sen. Greg Treat. The bill next heads to the full Senate for consideration.

The measure would require the Oklahoma State Board of Health to develop a list of standards for facilities, supplies, equipment and personnel that abortion providers must maintain at all times.

LLudo / Flickr.com

Two bills to further restrict abortion in Oklahoma have easily cleared a state House committee.

Members of the House Public Health Committee approved both bills during its regular meeting Tuesday.

One bill by Broken Arrow Republican Rep. Mike Ritze would require abortion providers to have clinical privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of their practice. A second bill by Edmond Republican Rep. Randy Grau restricts the use of abortion inducing drugs.

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