agriculture

StateImpact Oklahoma
7:39 am
Thu February 26, 2015

Oklahoma 'Right To Farm' Push About More Than Agricultural Practices

Attendees listen as former Missouri state senator Wes Shoemeyer speaks against Amendment 1 at the Missouri’s Food for America sign-making event at Café Berlin Friday, June 27, 2014 in Columbia, Missouri.
KOMUnews Flickr

Oklahoma voters have at least a year before seeing for and against state questions on the ballot in November 2016. But you might want to get used to hearing this phrase now: right-to-farm. It’s a divisive national issue that’s made its way to the Sooner State, and puts agriculture at odds with environmentalists and animal rights activists.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
10:41 am
Wed February 18, 2015

Oklahoma Part Of National Effort To Bring Battered Butterfly Population Back

David Levinson Flickr

Habitat loss and the use of herbicides to kill butterfly-preferred milkweed plants have caused the monarch butterfly population to drop by 90 percent over the last twenty years, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Now, the race is on to save the monarchs through the newly announced National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Monarch Conservation Fund, a partnership with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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World
1:32 pm
Tue February 10, 2015

China's Pork Feeds People And Economies

Pigs on a farm in the village of Gangzhong in China's eastern Zhejiang province on November 19, 2013. (Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue February 10, 2015 1:57 pm

More than half of the world’s pigs are in China. In 2012, farmers there produced more than 50 million metric tons of pork – five times the amount produced by the United States.

The growing industrialization of pig farming is putting small farmers out of business and it’s creating soil and water pollution.

The demand for grain to include in animal feed dramatically increased exports to China from South America and around the world.

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Weather and Climate
1:29 pm
Tue February 10, 2015

Ranchers Fight Drought With Desert Cows

Criollo cattle on the Jornada Experimental Range. These cattle can survive in desert environments, which ranchers hope will make them a better choice in the drought ridden American west. (Ted of DGAR/Flickr Creative Commons)

Originally published on Tue February 10, 2015 1:57 pm

Imagine a cow that can tolerate the heat and eats relatively little grass – in other words, a cow that can thrive in the desert.

Meet the Criollo, a cattle breed that was brought to America by Columbus and established by the Spanish conquistadors in the late 1500s.

Criollos were hardy and raised for milk, meat and leather, but the British phased them out in the late 1800s when they introduced new breeds.

Now, researchers and ranchers – especially out West where drought continues to plague farms – are looking to bring back these desert-friendly cows.

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Agriculture
4:38 pm
Wed November 19, 2014

Combines Sitting Idle During Winter Months Could Make Money For Owners

Credit David Wright / Flickr.com

A combine-sharing program touted as the first of its kind in the country aims to give farmers a chance to make some money off expensive equipment that sits idle after harvest is finished.

FarmLink announced Wednesday its farmer-to-farmer program allows farmers with spring or early summer harvests in Kansas, Colorado, Oklahoma and Texas to rent their combines to farmers with later harvests farther north.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
8:03 am
Thu September 25, 2014

Confusion Fueling Oklahoma Outcry Over EPA’s ‘Waters Of The United States’ Rule

Mason Bolay climbs into the cab of a tractor on his family's farm near Perry, Okla.
Logan Layden StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Congressman Jim Bridenstine calls it a power grab by an imperial president. U.S. Representative Frank Lucas says it would trigger an onslaught of additional red tape for famers and ranchers in Oklahoma.

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Business
2:39 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

Industrial Hemp Is Poised For A Comeback, But Hemp Seeds Hard To Come By

Hemp can be refined into products including foods, rope, cloth, paper and fuel. (Jon Kalish)

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 2:12 pm

For the first time in decades, industrial hemp crops were planted in Kentucky, Colorado and Vermont this spring. A dozen other states have passed legislation in support of hemp farming, and the latest farm bill eased restrictions on cultivation in some states.

Industrial hemp could be poised for a comeback in the U.S., but there are a couple of roadblocks. Hemp remains a controlled substance, according to the federal government, which says it is illegal to grow it or import viable hemp seeds for planting.

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Business Intelligence Report
9:32 am
Mon July 21, 2014

Top Business Stories: Tax Holiday, Urgent Care Clinics, And The Push For "Right-To-Farm" Legislation

Santi Kos, manager of Fashion Sport and Uniforms at 1300 NW 23rd St. in Oklahoma City.
Credit Brent Fuchs, The Journal Record

Parents, Cities And Counties Plan For Back-To-School Tax Holiday.

August first through third, shoppers don’t have to pay sales tax on clothing items that cost less than $100. The holiday was implemented in 2007 to discourage shoppers from crossing state lines to save.

That’s good news for family budgets, but it also means the state misses out on $4 million it might have had otherwise.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
7:10 am
Thu June 26, 2014

Study: Climate Change Challenges Oklahoma’s Temperature-Sensitive Economy

Future temperature changes pose serious risks to the climate-sensitive agricultural and energy industries in Oklahoma and other Great Plains states, a new study on the business and economic effects of climate change concludes.

Oklahoma's average summer temperature range is expected to increase from 81.7-83.58°F to 87.0-93.51°F from 2020 to 2099, the report predicts.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
12:35 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Oklahoma’s Drought-Withered Wheat Harvest Could Have National Effects

Brothers and business partners Fred and Wayne Schmedt stand in their family's wheat field near Altus in southwest Oklahoma.
Joe Wertz StateImpact Oklahoma

Four years of extreme drought has withered the agricultural economies of southern Great Plains states like Oklahoma, where farmers are bracing for one of worst wheat crops in state history.

And Oklahoma’s withered wheat harvest could have national consequences.

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