art

Arts and Entertainment
1:38 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

That's No Emoji, That's A Work Of Art

“Under the Wave off Kanagawa,” Katsushika Hokusai, about 1830–31 (MFA Boston)

Originally published on Tue April 28, 2015 1:35 pm

There's a good chance you've seen “The Great Wave.” The 19th century woodblock print by Japanese artist Hokusai depicts a towering blue ocean crest and it has been adored, co-opted and parodied by other artists and in ad campaigns for everything from blue jeans to beer.

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World Views
1:13 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

World Views: February 27, 2015

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss tensions between Israel and the United States ahead of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s address to Congress next week, and European nations that are working to develop a more unified energy policy.

Then, a conversation with art historian Maya Stanfield-Mazzi. She studies pre-Colombian art in the Andes, and says the work of South America’s Inca culture was abstract, without a clear narrative.

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Arts and Entertainment
4:17 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Heirs Seek Return Of Medieval Art From Germany

A visitor looks at the the cupola reliquary (Kuppelreliquar) of the so-called 'Welfenschatz' (Guelph Treasure) displayed at the Kunstgewerbemuseum (Museum of Decorative Arts) in Berlin, on February 24, 2015. U.S. and British heirs of Nazi-era Jewish art dealers have sued Germany for the return of a mediaeval art treasure worth $250-300 million, their lawyers said. (Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 1:57 pm

The descendants of Jewish art dealers are seeking the return of a medieval art collection they say was sold under pressure to Nazi officials. The collection was given to Adolf Hitler as a birthday present in 1935; it is now housed in a Berlin art museum and considered a cultural treasure.

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World Views
10:49 am
Wed February 25, 2015

Art In Andean Religious Traditions And How It Evolved After Spanish Conquest

University of Arizona Press

Colonization of the Andes and the expansion of Catholicism changed the subjects of the region’s art, but many of the older traditions survived Spain’s settlement of South America.

Pre-Columbian art forms in the Andes often used vivid colors, precious metals, and fine textiles to represent the sacred.

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Arts and Entertainment
10:49 am
Tue February 24, 2015

Daughters Back An Artful End To The Rivera-Rockefeller Rivalry Story

Diego Rivera, seen here in 1933, works on a panel of his mural in the lobby of Rockefeller Center.
AP

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 6:48 am

It's been called one of the great rivalries of the art world — a clash between egos, riches and ideologies. In the spring of 1932, capitalist (and prolific collector of Mexican art) Nelson Rockefeller hired Mexican painter and staunch socialist Diego Rivera to paint a mural for the lobby of the newly erected Rockefeller Center in New York City. Sketches were drawn and approved, but when reporters leaked that Rivera had added an image of Russian revolutionary Vladimir Lenin, a battle began.

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World Views
12:39 pm
Thu September 11, 2014

Author Esmeralda Santiago Finds Identity Through Art

banditob

When Esmeralda Santiago arrived in New York City in the early 1960s, she was completely terrified.

“I always think of the trip from Puerto Rico to the United States as probably the most traumatic thing that ever happened to me,” Santiago says. “I was a rural girl. We lived out in the country. I had never seen television. We had no electricity or running water.”

The alienation Santiago felt informed her writing. That turmoil, and her love for the history of Puerto Rico and the voices of characters she heard in her dreams, became Santiago’s novel Conquistadora.

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Oklahoma Voices
11:35 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Three Reasons Why American Artists Rarely Painted The Civil War

Prisoners from the Front
Winslow Homer The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The first two major American military conflicts produced some of the most important art of the 18th and 19th centuries. John Trumbull’s portraits of the signing of the Declaration of Independence and Alexander Hamilton were later immortalized on the back of U.S. currency, and Thomas Birch documented the major navel battles of the War of 1812.

But there’s a void in cultural output when it comes to the Civil War. Princeton University art historian John Wilmerding argues there are three reasons: a high point of American literature, the rise of photography, and the American landscape as the definition of national identity.

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OneSix8
9:57 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Entertaining The Hours of Your Week: Artistic Adventures

Credit Ashley Campbell

Art comes in all shapes, sizes and forms and artistic event opportunities fill this weekend's OneSix8. If you are a natural artists, or just someone trying to learn a new skill, this weekend has an event for your creative side.

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World Views
4:30 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

World Views: August 23, 2013

Joshua Landis provides an update on Syria after anti-government activists accused President Bashar al-Assad's regime of carrying out a toxic gas attack, and the panel discusses the renewed focus on U.S. gun culture after the murder of an Australian student in Oklahoma.

The departing director of the University of Oklahoma’s Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art says 21st Century art will be shaped by music, video, and other mixed media to visually express ideas in new and exciting ways. Ghislain d’Humières takes over as the CEO of the Speed Art Museum in Louisville Sept. 3.

World Views
11:09 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Outgoing OU Museum Director Says Technology Will Define Art’s Next Generation

A mural at the Venezuela Pavilion at the 55th Art Biennale in Venice, Italy.
Credit Konstantinos Koukopoulos / Flickr Creative Commons

The departing director of the University of Oklahoma’s Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art says 21st Century art will be shaped by music, video, and other mixed media to visually express ideas in new and exciting ways.

Ghislain d’Humières spoke with World Views host and OU College of International Studies Dean Suzette Grillot shortly before he takes over as the CEO of the Speed Art Museum in Louisville.

“It’s an exciting trend. There is absolutely no border on the canvas. Anything could be the canvas,” d’Humières says. “One could argue that every period had a very cutting-edge, contemporary time, but I think the period we’re living in right now has been seeing a huge amount of new technology and new ways to express art.”

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