KGOU

art

Bergère rentrant des moutons (Shepherdess Bringing in Sheep), 1886
 Oil on canvas, 
18 1/4 x 15 in.
Camille Pissarro (
France, 1830-1903) / Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art; The University of Oklahoma, Norman Aaron M. and Clara Weitzenhoffer Bequest, 2000

The fate of a painting at the center of a years-long dispute between its former owners and the University of Oklahoma has been settled.

Attorney Pierre Ciric, who represents the family of Léone Meyer, said Tuesday morning the settlement reached between the family, the University of Oklahoma, and the OU Foundation acknowledges all parties - including the Weitzenhoffer family, who donated the painting to OU – acted in good faith.

The Volland Store is no longer a store, but an art gallery in the Flint Hills of Kansas.
C.J. Janovy / KCUR

Inside the gallery, it’s a scene familiar to anyone who attends art openings: People are enjoying the oil paintings and large-scale photographs bathed in natural light, snacking on cheese and crackers while lively conversation bounces off the brick walls and polished wood floors.

Outside, though, is the wide-open silence of the Kansas Flint Hills.

The Price Tower in downtown Bartlesville, Oklahoma.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

Just 20 miles south of the Oklahoma-Kansas border lies a structure that can’t be missed. The tower draws crowds from around the world and has given a little city a big name.

Bartlesville’s Price Tower is an anomaly. In an oil and gas town filled with short red­, orange­-and-brown ­brick buildings, its 19 ­stories stand tall with green patina copper and cantilevered floors.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the former military dictator who’s about to take over for Goodluck Jonathan as Nigeria’s new president, and two dozen looted religious artifacts recently returned to Italy.

Then, Rebecca talks with war photographer Ashley Gilbertson. His most recent book, Bedrooms of the Fallen, depicts the homes of men and women who died in Iraq and Afghanistan to remember how they lived, rather than how they died.

The Euphronios krater, repatriated to Italy by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City in 2006.
Jaime Ardiles-Arce / Wikimedia Commons

Last week, 25 stolen archaeological artifacts – some dating back to the first century – were repatriated to Italy. Italy’s Division for the Protection of Cultural Heritage worked in cooperation with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement unit to track down and return the items, which had been sold to museums, auction houses, and private collectors throughout the United States.

That's No Emoji, That's A Work Of Art

Apr 3, 2015

There's a good chance you've seen “The Great Wave.” The 19th century woodblock print by Japanese artist Hokusai depicts a towering blue ocean crest and it has been adored, co-opted and parodied by other artists and in ad campaigns for everything from blue jeans to beer.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss tensions between Israel and the United States ahead of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s address to Congress next week, and European nations that are working to develop a more unified energy policy.

Then, a conversation with art historian Maya Stanfield-Mazzi. She studies pre-Colombian art in the Andes, and says the work of South America’s Inca culture was abstract, without a clear narrative.

The descendants of Jewish art dealers are seeking the return of a medieval art collection they say was sold under pressure to Nazi officials. The collection was given to Adolf Hitler as a birthday present in 1935; it is now housed in a Berlin art museum and considered a cultural treasure.

University of Arizona Press

Colonization of the Andes and the expansion of Catholicism changed the subjects of the region’s art, but many of the older traditions survived Spain’s settlement of South America.

Pre-Columbian art forms in the Andes often used vivid colors, precious metals, and fine textiles to represent the sacred.

It's been called one of the great rivalries of the art world — a clash between egos, riches and ideologies. In the spring of 1932, capitalist (and prolific collector of Mexican art) Nelson Rockefeller hired Mexican painter and staunch socialist Diego Rivera to paint a mural for the lobby of the newly erected Rockefeller Center in New York City. Sketches were drawn and approved, but when reporters leaked that Rivera had added an image of Russian revolutionary Vladimir Lenin, a battle began.

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