Barack Obama

President Obama said Monday Russian aggression against Ukraine has reinforced the unity of the U.S. and its partners in Europe and around the world.

Obama spoke at a joint news conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. He says if Russia continues on its current course, its political and economic isolation will worsen.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss President Obama’s recent trip to India, and this week’s legislative elections in Greece that saw huge left-wing parliamentary gains and a new coalition government.

Then University of New Hampshire historian Nicoletta Gullace discusses her work tracing how changing turn-of-the-century gender roles led to women's increased participation in war activities.

Rebecca Cruise reports on the Xi Jinping's tour of South Asia and its effects on the future of trade between China and those countries. She also outlines President Obama's strategy to help contain the Ebola outbreak devastating West Africa.

Later in the program, Suzette Grillot interviews groundbreaking social entrepreneur Paul Polak about his strategies for pulling people out of poverty around the world.

On Tuesday President Obama warned of the growing global threat posed by the deadly Ebola epidemic sweeping across Africa and announced a new plan to combat the virus.

“If the outbreak is not stopped now, we could be looking at hundreds of thousands of people infected, with profound political and economic and security implications for all of us,” President Obama said in his speech at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia.

President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden meet with members of the National Security Council in the Situation Room of the White House, Sept. 10, 2014.
Pete Souza / The White House

Syria, Russia, and Iran have condemned the plan to lead a broad coalition against the Islamic State President Obama outlined Wednesday night, stating that without a UN resolution U.S. action in Syria would be an act of aggression and in violation of international law.

Speaking from the State Floor in the White House on September 10, 2014, President Obama addressed the nation on the situation in Iraq and the United States’ strategy to degrade and defeat ISIL, a terrorist organization.
The White House / YouTube

U.S. Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla. 4) says he would vote to give President Obama any authority and resources he needs to address the growing threat from the Islamic State.

“I have no doubt that such authorization would be overwhelmingly supported by both houses of Congress and on both sides of the aisle,” Cole said in a statement. “Americans, our friends and our enemies need to see the president and Congress united in their determination to destroy this very dangerous foe.”

President Obama at the Resolute Desk in the Oval Office
Pete Souza / The White House

President Obama touts diplomacy as a characterizing trait of his administration, but his actions reveal a mix of diplomatic persuasion and the coercive use of force.

New York Times national security correspondent David Sanger says President Obama prioritizes minimizing global conflict, but the president’s increased-yet-subtle application of force contrasts the previous administration’s foreign policy decisions.

If more were actually getting done in Washington, there probably would be much less attention focused on how few times President Obama and Speaker John Boehner have met face-to-face, and on their "relationship."

But Congress is testing new lows in terms of legislative productivity, which leaves plenty of time for journalists to muse about the president-speaker relationship, such as it is, on the day of one of their rare meetings.

President Obama delivers his 2014 State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress Tuesday, January 28, 2014.
The White House / YouTube

Most of Oklahoma’s all-Republican Congressional delegation panned President Obama’s 2014 State of the Union address he delivered to a joint session of Congress Tuesday night.

U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe says the President made it clear he would continue to bypass Congress, and use a “pen and phone” to get work done. Inhofe says Americans will see this play out with a Climate Action Plan the president unveiled last summer.

Medill DC / Flickr Creative Commons

President Obama called U.S. Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) a personal friend who was willing to work in a bipartisan manner to fight wasteful spending and cut down on earmarks.

In a statement released by the White House on Friday, Obama noted that he and Coburn were both elected to the Senate in 2004 and quickly became friends after their wives struck up a conversation. Obama said the people of Oklahoma have been "well-served by this 'country doctor from Muskogee' over the past nine years."

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