books

Education
3:41 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

The College You Go To May Not Matter As Much As You Think

(Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 1:06 pm

This is the time of year when many high school seniors get their college acceptances and rejections. Some may be dejected that they didn’t get into their first choice school or a school with a stellar reputation.

But as New York Times columnist Frank Bruni writes in his new book, there are many great schools that haven’t been getting the press of a Stanford or MIT or an Ivy League school.

Bruni also questions the validity of current college ranking systems like U.S. News & World Report.

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Children's Books
2:11 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

An Astronaut Uses Books To Launch Kids Into Science

Former NASA astronaut Mark Kelly wants to encourage children to dream big and maybe even dream of launching into space. Pictured, a nighttime scene of the eastern North Atlantic taken from the International Space Station on Mar. 28, 2012. (NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 1:45 pm

Mark Kelly and his twin brother Scott were both NASA astronauts. Scott is scheduled to embark on a year-long mission to the International Space Station later this month.

Mark retired from NASA to spend more time with his wife, Arizona congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords who was shot at a public appearance in 2011.

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Books
3:57 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Is The Internet Hurting More Than Helping?

Participants at the tech conference TechCrunch Disrupt 2014 in San Francisco, California. Silicon Valley entrepreneur Andrew Keen is critical of how the Internet has created a Silicon Valley elite. (Steve Jennings/Getty Images for TechCrunch)

Originally published on Mon March 16, 2015 5:39 pm

Andrew Keen works in Silicon Valley and founded a couple of start-ups, but he’s not sold on the Internet.

In his latest book “The Internet Is Not The Answer,” Keen makes the case that the Internet as it exists now hurts the middle class.

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Books
1:43 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

The Beanie Baby Boom And Bust – What Happened?

(dominiquegodbout/Flickr)

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 3:11 pm

At one point in the late 1990s, a $5 toy mass-produced in China became such a big craze that people – mostly adults – paid thousands of dollars to collect them. But only a few years after Beanie Babies made their creator a billionaire, the stuffed animals became virtually worthless.

Author Zac Bissonnette followed the great Beanie Baby boom and went inside the mind of the toy’s obsessed founder Ty Warner, considered by his employees to be “the Steve Jobs of plush.” But working for Ty wasn’t always warm and cuddly.

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Book Reviews
12:41 pm
Tue February 10, 2015

Cozy 'Blue Thread' Is Unabashedly Domestic

Originally published on Tue February 10, 2015 8:35 am

You don't read Anne Tyler to have your worldview expanded, or to be kept awake at night anxiously turning pages. You read, instead, for the cozy mildness, the comfort of sinking into each new warmhearted, gently wry book.

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Author Interviews
10:01 am
Fri February 6, 2015

On Board A City Bus, A Little Boy Finds The Route To Gratitude

"Nana, how come we don't have a car?" CJ asks. "Boy, what do we need a car for?" Nana replies. "We got a bus that breathes fire."
Christian Robinson Courtesy of Penguin Random House Publishing

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 9:15 am

Last Stop on Market Street is a new picture book that takes children on a journey, not to an imaginary land far, far away but to a much more real place by way of a city bus. CJ is riding with his grandmother, Nana, and along the way, he encounters a variety of passengers — a man covered in tattoos, an elderly woman with a jar of butterflies, a blind man and his guide dog, teens listening to music.

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Books
3:03 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Wes Moore On Looking For Work That Matters

Wes Moore's latest book is "The Work: My Search for a Life That Matters." (Amun Ankhra)

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 1:54 pm

As readers of his bestselling book “The Other Wes Moore” know, Wes Moore was the child of a single mother and had a troubled childhood. He tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson he “was on academic and disciplinary probation by the time I was 8, 9 years old… and when I was 11 was the first time I felt handcuffs on my wrists.”

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Books
3:59 pm
Tue November 11, 2014

Amanda Palmer On 'The Art Of Asking'

Amanda Palmer's new memoir is "The Art of Asking." (Robin Lubbock/Here & Now)

Originally published on Tue November 11, 2014 1:46 pm

Musician Amanda Palmer got a lot of flack for her Kickstarter campaign that raised over a million dollars to produce a new indie album and tour. How dare she! She was married to the famous (read: rich) author Neil Gaiman! She asked musicians to join her on tour — unpaid. She took advantage of fans, slept on their couches. Gawker called it the smoke-and-mirror tactics of a grifter.

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The Protojournalist
11:58 am
Tue November 11, 2014

The Secrets Of The Coxswain

The gold-medal winning U.S. rowing team — coxswain at lower left — at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing.
Danny Moloschok/Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 12, 2014 9:09 pm

For British astrophysicist Stephen Hawking — subject of a just-released biopic — being one turned his life around. American newshound Anderson Cooper was one, the Yale Daily News reports. So was photographer Lord Snowdon, former husband to Princess Margaret, according to Rowing History.

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Books
7:53 am
Mon September 8, 2014

Horton Meets A ... Who? Introducing The Kwuggerbug, From Seuss' 'Lost Stories'

Random House

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 11:10 am

Theodor Geisel — better known as Dr. Seuss — has been charming generations of children and adults since the 1950s. And though Seuss died in 1991, a new collection of his lesser-known work, called Horton and the Kwuggerbug and More Lost Stories, comes out Tuesday.

"The four stories in this book came from columns that appeared in Redbook magazine in the 1950s," explains Cathy Goldsmith, an associate publishing director at Random House. "Dr. Seuss actually wrote a piece once a month for Redbook."

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