KGOU

Brazil

Suzette Grillot checks in with Erika Larkins. She just returned from a year-long assignment in Brazil, and she'll offer her takeaways from the 2016 Summer Olympic games, which wrapped up Sunday.

But first, Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis join the program to discuss Turkey's recent military moves in Syria, and North Korea's testing of a submarine-launched missile.

At the top of Rocinha favela in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Suzette Grillot / KGOU

Editor's Note: This interview originally aired June 3, 2014..

A week before the 2014 FIFA World Cup begins in Brazil, soccer’s international governing body has expressed concern that three of the stadiums won’t be ready, and legendary Brazilian striker Ronaldo says he’s “appalled” by his country’s preparations for the sport’s biggest event.

Military medical personnel attend a drill that simulates a biological or nuclear attack at Galeo Air Base in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Friday, July 15, 2016.
Renata Brito / AP

The 2016 Summer Olympics open Friday night in Rio de Janeiro. Like soccer’s World Cup two years ago, the event has drawn the world’s attention to Brazil’s largest city and raised questions about health, security, and the country’s economic and political climate.

As the 2016 Summer Olympics get underway in Rio de Janeiro, we revisit Suzette Grillot's 2014 conversation with University of Oklahoma anthropologist Erika Robb Larkins about the city's poorest neighborhoods.

Larkins then joins the show from Brazil to provide an update on the city's mood and preparation ahead of Friday's opening ceremonies.

David Hernández-Palmar

When anthropologist Laura Graham was working on her graduate research with the Xavante people in Brazil during the 1990s, she encountered a Catholic priest who inadvertently showed her the power of media.

“He came to the community, and he brought film of Xavante that had been filmed in another area,” Graham said. “And they were so excited to see this film. But he said, ‘You can watch this film after you watch a film of Jesus Christ and the Resurrection.’ So it was this kind of bribe. And that made a big impression on me.”

Suzette Grillot is still in Turkey, and talks with University of Oklahoma economist Firat Demir again this week about Saturday's bombing in Ankara, and the response from the government and everyday Turks.

Then Suzette explores some of the parallels between Brazil’s military dictatorships, and the country’s LGBTQ subculture in the 20th century with Brown University historian James Green. They'll also discuss evolving U.S. opposition to Brazil’s military junta in the 1960s and 70s.

Brazil's Tancredo Neves campaigning before his 1985 election. He was the first democratically elected president in a quarter-century, but died before taking office.
Cidadão de Minas / Flickr

After the Cuban Revolution in 1959, U.S. policy makers worried other left-leaning governments in Latin American could turn into a revolutionary movement. In early 1964, the U.S. did little to stand in the way of a military coup in Brazil that overthrew the democratically elected President Joao Goulart – leading to a 21-year authoritarian dictatorship.

Suzette Grillot talks with Maxine Margolis, an anthropologist at the University of Florida and Columbia University’s institute of Latin American Studies. She’s spent her career studying the thousands of college-educated Brazilians come to the United States every year.

But first, last week’s discussion of the ongoing migrant crisis continues with Mitchell Smith, who chairs the University of Oklahoma's European Union Center. He discusses the EU policy responses to the refugees and other migrants arriving in Europe.

Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Suzette Grillot / KGOU

Since the 1990s, Brazil has slowly positioned itself as a major economic world player. It’s been one of the fastest-growing economies in the world over the past two decades, with abundant natural resources and ongoing appreciation of its currency. Goldman Sachs economist Jim O’Neill coined the term BRIC in a 2001 paper to describe how Brazil, Russia, India, and China could become economic juggernauts by the year 2050.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise spent the week working in Rio de Janeiro, and review their impressions of a dynamic and vibrant Brazil.

Later, Rebecca talks with Harvard University political scientist Beth Simmons. She studies transnational crime, and they'll discuss her work framing the debate on human rights.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the escalating situation between Israel and Palestine, both the real and potential impact of host nation Brazil’s loss this week in the World Cup.

Then a conversation with national security analyst Linda Robinson about her book One Hundred Victories: Special Ops and the Future of American Warfare. She spent two years in Afghanistan joining U.S. Special Forces on combat missions, while still knowing when to stay out of the way.

As President Obama and world leaders convened in France to commemorate the 70th anniversary of D-Day, Suzette Grillot spoke with Italian citizen Katia Girotto about Italy's memory of World War II. June 4 marked the 70th anniversary of the fall of Rome.

Later, a conversation with University of Oklahoma anthropologist Erika Robb Larkins about Brazil's favela neighborhoods ahead of next week's opening of the World Cup, and the 2016 Olympics.

At the top of Rocinha favela in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Suzette Grillot / KGOU

A week before the 2014 FIFA World Cup begins in Brazil, soccer’s international governing body has expressed concern that three of the stadiums won’t be ready, and legendary Brazilian striker Ronaldo says he’s “appalled” by his country’s preparations for the sport’s biggest event.

Suzette Grillot wraps up a three week, two continent trip with a conversation from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil with University of Oklahoma anthropologist and International Studies professor Erika Robb Larkins.

Later, Suzette and Rebecca Cruise discuss the five Oscar nominees for Best Foreign Language Film ahead of Sunday evening's Academy Awards.

Suzette Grillot / KGOU

Rio de Janeiro is known throughout the world for its Carnival celebration and an incredibly diverse and lively culture, but this vibrant image contrasts with striking examples of inequality.

University of Oklahoma anthropologist and International Studies professor Erika Robb Larkins says “the beauty of the contradiction of Brazil” is the coexistence of cultural vibrancy and the challenges facing segments of the population. Wealth neighbors poverty in close proximity throughout Rio de Janeiro.  

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