KGOU

Business Intelligence Report

New Shows, New Times

Nov 10, 2017
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This is the Manager’s Minute.

From time to time, circumstances require us to change our programming schedule…and this is one of those times.

To the Point is going podcast-only, so in its 2:00 p.m. time slot we’re adding Fresh Air Monday through Thursday.

Science Friday will continue to air Fridays from 1:00 to 3:00, and Fresh Air will repeat at 7:00 on weeknights.

Current Conversations is going on hiatus, so we’re adding an extra half hour of All Things Considered Monday evenings from 6:30 to 7:00.

Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

State and federal scientists say that recent earthquakes in two Oklahoma cities are probably aftershocks, rather than indications of larger quakes to come.

Sarah Terry-Cobo writes in the Journal Record:

A woman pulls a suitcase along NE 23rd Street near N. Spencer Road in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Oklahoma City residents’ life expectancies vary greatly across the city. Among all ZIP codes, the difference between the highest life expectancy and the lowest is 18 years.

According to the Oklahoma City-County Health Department’s new wellness report, residents in the  73131 ZIP code have a life expectancy of 82 years, while their neighbors in the next door 73141 ZIP code live for an average of less than 68 years - a similar expectancy as developing countries such as Cambodia and Iraq.

Oklahoma state capitol
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Billions of dollars in Oklahoma state funds are reserved for education, revolving funds and other costs.  Called "apportionments," these allotments are beyond the reach of legislators and can't be changed.

Motorists travel past construction on Lindsey Street in Norman.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

The owners of some businesses in Norman have seen a decline in sales due to ongoing road and bridge construction along Lindsey Street.

International Pantry general manager Kristen McCall says sales have declined about 30 percent since the spring of 2016 when the I-35 exit closed. The Oklahoma Department of Transportation is currently constructing a new bridge over I-35 at Lindsey.

The Journal Record’s Molly Fleming writes internet sales have also hurt the business.

Volunteers start on a new home at 7308 Park Meadow in Oklahoma City’s Legacy Estates addition as part of Central Oklahoma Habitat for Humanity’s annual Women Build.
Central Oklahoma Habitat for Humanity

Update May 5, 2017 at 1:44 p.m.

On Friday, the Senate Joint Committee on Appropriations and Budget passed an amended version of the bill, now called HB 2403. It now excludes charitable giving from the $17,000 cap on itemized tax deductions. 

The Devon Energy Center in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

 

 

Oklahoma City-based Devon Energy announced it will sell over one billion dollars in assets over the next year.

Oklahoma City University law students Sonya Chronister, Cameron Farnsworth and Marcos Sierra talk about the Oklahoma Innocence Project’s latest work while sitting in the J. William Conger Courtroom at the OCU School of Law.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

The Oklahoma Innocence Project’s caseload is growing after the non-profit scored a legal victory last year that exonerated two former inmates.

In May 2016, Malcolm Scott and De’Marchoe Carpenter left prison for the first time in 16 years after the Oklahoma Innocence Project cleared the two men. Both were wrongfully convicted in the 1994 murder of Karen Summers and sentenced to life plus 170 years.

Voters wait in line at a polling place inside Life.Church in Edmond Tuesday.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

Voters in Edmond rejected a proposed expansion of the Spring Creek Plaza shopping center on Tuesday.

The Journal Record’s Molly Fleming writes the proposal would have added 260,000 square feet of retail space at S. Bryant Avenue and E. 15th Street, as well as 325 luxury apartments. The city council approved the zoning change to the 26-acre  property in November.

Royden Freeland Jr. tests equipment at International Crystal Manufacturing, 10 N. Lee Ave. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

Royden Freeland, Sr. founded International Crystal Manufacturing in 1951 in Oklahoma City’s FIlm Row district. Later this year, the company will close its doors.

A helicopter is shown on a landing pad at OU Medical Center, 700 NE 13th St. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

Oklahoma City’s two largest hospital systems chose not go ahead with proposed merger earlier this week. The University of Oklahoma Medical Services and SSM Health, the parent company that operates St. Anthony’s Hospital, announced on Monday that their proposed merger had fallen through.

Students listen during a class titled “Land and Lease” at Oklahoma City University’s School of Law in downtown Oklahoma City Monday.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

It’s been nearly 70 years since Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher made history when she became the first African American law student at the University of Oklahoma. Today, there are still few African Americans at law firms.

The Journal Record’s Sarah Terry Cobo writes Sipuel Fisher was a pioneer who challenged segregation.

Tamiko Cabatic prepares blood samples for blood typing and screening at the Oklahoma Blood Institute in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

 

Oklahoma City’s biotech industry is budding, but politics, investment and education are hampering its growth.

The Journal Record’s Catherine Sweeney reports the industry attracts billions of dollars annually. However, some pieces of legislation have branded the state as “anti-research,” poor education funding limits the number of students who can work in STEM field, and investors are leery of the state.

cigarettes
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

 

Health care providers are lining up behind a proposal to increase Oklahoma’s sales tax on cigarettes by $1.50. The proposal is also attracting the supports of child advocacy groups.

 

Moving to a rural Oklahoma town can be hard selling point for the state’s tribes, especially for high-demand, skilled professions like doctors and chefs.

The Journal Record newspaper released a special issue this week, Building Bridges, that looks at the tribal impact on Oklahoma’s economy. As part of the issue, reporter Catherine Sweeny noted that tribal healthcare facilities have to compete with metropolitan areas to attract doctors.

Emergency Department director Dr. Robin Mantooth and Chief Operating Officer John Manfredo lead a tour of the department at Norman Regional Health System’s new hospital building in Moore on January 17, 2017.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

One of Oklahoma’s health information exchanges will close. Coordinated Care Oklahoma announced on Monday that the non-profit organization plans to fold.

Health information exchanges let healthcare providers share and access records across hospitals. Journal Record reporter Sarah Terry Cobo writes that Coordinated Care  as in the process of merging with a competitor called MyHealth Access Network before making its sudden decision.

Roy Diehl removes the “Open” sign from the entrance to Urban Agrarian at 1235 SW Second St. in Oklahoma City Tuesday , Jan. 10, 2017.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

One of the anchors of Oklahoma City’s Farmers Market District is shutting down. Urban Agrarian is a local food distribution hub. Its owner announced this Monday that he is closing the business.

Urban Agrarian owner Matt Burch worked with Oklahoma farmers to bring their products to Oklahoma City and other cities’ farmers markets. In Oklahoma City, he sold products directly to consumers and to restaurants that wanted locally-grown produce.

Tiffany Batdorf is the business improvement district chief executive for Oklahoma City’s Adventure District.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

 

Oklahoma City’s Adventure District is home to some big attractions, such as the zoo, Remington Park, the National Softball Hall of Fame and Science Museum Oklahoma. But development has been slow in the area, and some residents and business owners are voicing their displeasure.

Curtis Davis loads a cardboard baler at St. Anthony hospital in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

False Medical Claims Investigations in Oklahoma

About seven years ago, the U.S. Attorney General’s office began working with district court prosecutors to crack down on false medical claims. They are investigated all the time, and settlements have become more common in Oklahoma. Many of the investigations are settled before a complaint is filed.

Adam Brooks, the managing editor of The Journal Record newspaper, said most false claims involve overcharging Medicaid.

Printing Company Xerox Brings Lawsuit Against Metro-Based Tate Publishing

Jun 11, 2016
Tate Publishing & Enterprises at 127 Trade Center Terr. in Mustang.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Tate Publishing, a Christian book and music publisher based in Mustang, Oklahoma, is facing a lawsuit from Xerox. The printing company alleges Tate owes over $1.7 million.

 

Xerox and Tate have been working together since about 2003, and Xerox helped Tate increase their printing operation.

 

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