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Renovation continues on the Sunshine Cleaners building at 1012 NW First St. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

In April the Oklahoma City Council approved $550,000 in tax increment financing, or TIF money, for the dilapidated Sunshine Cleaners building just west of downtown.

About the only remarkable thing about the building two blocks from the Oklahoma County Jail is its beautiful neon sign. The roof has caved in, the windows are broken, and satellite imagery even shows an abandoned vehicle inside the building.

Oklahoma City University professor Kyle Dean presents findings of an economic impact report during the Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association conference Tuesday in Tulsa.
Rip Stell / The Journal Record

Casinos in rural Oklahoma bring in about half of all gaming revenue, and the small towns these establishments call home reap some of the rewards.

A report presented at the Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association conference Tuesday revealed that small, rural towns get an economic boost when a tribal casino opens, The Journal Record’s Molly Fleming reports:

The Shawnee Tribe has announced plans to build a casino in the state's Panhandle.

The Tulsa World reports the 60,000 square-foot Golden Mesa Casino would be located near Guymon on a 107-acre property off Highway 54.

Tribal officials say construction will begin in 2016 and would create 175 jobs with an estimated payroll of about $4 million.

In Perry, Tribal Rights Clear Way For Neighborhood Casino

Jan 23, 2015
The Oteo Missouria Tribe has razed three homes in an east Perry neighborhood to build a casino and parking lot.
Jocelyn Pedersen / Oklahoma Watch

The house, crouching in the middle of a neighborhood in east Perry, sat unoccupied for years.

Its shingles were rotted, and its metal porch railing was bent. Weeds and brush rose from the foundation past gaping, empty windows.

Last year, city officials notified the owners that they needed to clean up the property. The city wasn’t prepared for the counteroffer.

The Otoe-Missouria Tribe, which oversees the property, held in federal trust, proposed instead to raze the home and build a casino.

Moyen Brenn / Flickr.com

A new report shows the state of Oklahoma collected $122 million in gaming fees from Native American tribes during the last fiscal year.

The report issued Wednesday by the Office of Management and Enterprise Services shows that for the first time ever, the fees paid to the state declined from the previous year.

The report noted a drop of nearly $5.5 million — or about 4 percent — from previous year's collections. The funds are used primarily for public education.

Remington Park Bets On New App

Sep 12, 2014
AveryO / Wikimedia Commons

With casino-goers graying, Remington Park racetrack and casino is playing the odds that a younger crowd will find betting on the races more interesting by using their smartphones, according to the Journal Record this week.

“Mobile wagering” allows casino patrons to bet on the horses from the comfort of their seat at the slot machine, at the Casino’s “Silks” restaurant, or anywhere else on the site—as long as it’s at the track. The app knows if the patron leaves the property.

gambling man
Adrian Simpson / Flickr Creative Commons

Addiction treatment specialists say as dozens of tribal casinos popped up throughout the state in the past decade, resources for problem gamblers haven't kept pace.

Only 45 certified counselors are available at 12 treatment facilities, but specialists say there should be at least double the counselors.

The facilities are often located many miles from where problem gamblers live. One county in the northeastern part of the state has 11 casinos in a 30-mile radius but zero counselors.

peggydavis66 / Flickr.com

Oklahoma's casinos have seen recent increases in income while revenue is down for the state lottery and horse tracks.

Casino City's North American Gaming Almanac says Oklahoma's casinos saw revenue up 6.4 percent between 2010 and 2011. In the same period, lottery revenue was off 2.3 percent and horse racing revenue fell 8.8 percent

Need A Job? The Citizen Potawatomi Nation Wants You

May 11, 2013
courtesy of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation

The Citizen Potawatomi Nation is looking to expand its business enterprises by adding on a hotel to the Grand Casino. And the by-product of this expansion is jobs.

In addition to preparing for the opening of the Grand Casino Hotel and Resort , Paul Vanraamsdonk, Director of hotel operations, says the tribe is planning a job fair to fill those positions.