CDC

U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Oklahoma’s teen birth rate was ranked the second highest in the country in a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report released Wednesday.

The report showed Oklahoma’s teen birth rate has decreased over the past 20 years, but at a slower pace than in every state except North Dakota and South Dakota.

The 2012 rate in Oklahoma was 47.3 births per 1,000 teenagers ages 15 to 19. Only New Mexico had a higher rate. The national rate was 29.4 per 1,000 teenagers ages 15 to 19.

Each week, we take a look at a word or phrase that's caught our attention, whether for its history, usage, etymology, or just because it has an interesting story. You can see past "Word Watch" entries here.

"Who doesn't like zombies?"

That was the subject line of an email blast that landed in my inbox recently from a major online retailer as it announced it was "bringing their Black Friday deals back to life."

Imagine a friend of a friend brings his family to stay with you — his family of tiny survivalists. For weeks or months you all live quietly side by side with no problems. You share meals. Your kids play together.

Then one day you get sick — maybe felled by a bad cold or the flu. Suddenly certain the end is near, your jittery houseguest breaks out an armory's worth of chemical weapons. He abandons his community to save himself and hunt for a new home, wreaking havoc on the way out the door.

Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Last month, Gov. Mary Fallin announced her plans to support an initiative petition in 2014 to change the way tobacco is regulated in Oklahoma.

“A direct vote to the people is very new, and is a dramatic new tactic to repeal tobacco control preemption in Oklahoma,” said Michael Givel, a University of Oklahoma political scientist and the co-author of the upcoming book Heartland Tobacco War, out this summer.