KGOU

Charles McCall

Gov. Mary  Fallin vetoed most of the state's revised budget bill on Friday, November 17, 2017.
Governor Mary Fallin's office

Citing a failure to address several of her requests when she called a special session of the state legislature and the use of one-time funds, Gov. Mary Fallin vetoed the vast majority of a budget bill Friday evening.

Speaker of the Oklahoma House Charles McCall, R-Atoka, speaks at a news conference to announce a state budget deal on October 23, 2017.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Democrats in the Oklahoma House voted down a GOP-backed package that would have increased taxes on cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, low point beer and fuel on a tense day at the state capitol.

The plan would have also given a pay raise to teachers and some state employees.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin and Speaker of the House Charles McCall (left) announce a budget proposal on Oct. 23, 2017.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Five weeks after calling a special session, Gov. Mary Fallin announced Monday that Republicans in the state House and Senate have reached a budget deal to fill a $215 million shortfall.

Oklahoma state capitol
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Will the Oklahoma Legislature get behind a cigarette tax in the upcoming special session?

File / State of Oklahoma

A report published online Thursday claims to outline details of a budget agreement between Gov. Mary Fallin and House Democrats.

Oklahoma state Reps. Leslie Osborn, center, R-Mustang, Kevin Wallace, left, R-Wellston and Glen Mulready, right, R-Tulsa, talk on the House floor in Oklahoma City, Monday, May 22, 2017.
Sue Ogracki / AP

Capitol Insider: Money Heads Back To State Agencies, Osborn Out As Budget Chair

 


Despite finishing the fiscal year nearly 3.5 percent below general revenue estimates, Oklahoma will pay back state agencies that received mid-year cuts.

Oklahoma State Capitol Building
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

Oklahoma state lawmakers have yet to agree on a plan to raise money for the state, and could be facing special session. 

Oklahoma state Rep. Charles McCall, right, R-Atoka, Speaker of the House, answers a question during a news conference in Oklahoma City, Thursday, April 13, 2017. McCall discussed the budget and teacher pay raises.
Sue Ogrocki / AP Photo

 

 


 

What happened at the Capitol this week?

 

Oklahoma lawmakers are plugging away at a 2018 state budget--figuring out where the state’s money will come from and where it will go.

 

Clinton, Oklahoma, resident Cindy Box and her Horse, Rosie, at Foss State Park.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

In March, the legislature asked state agencies how they would deal with worst-case budget reductions of nearly 15 percent. A cut that deep at the Department of Tourism could cost Oklahoma half of its state parks.

Oklahoma Secretary of Finance Preston Doerflinger speaks during a meeting of the State Board of Equalization in Oklahoma City, Monday, June 20, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

 

 

Monthly revenue shortages have led Oklahoma finance officials to dip into the Rainy Day Fund again this year, draining it completely.

If the state does not have enough money to pay its monthly bills, it typically takes the difference from a state department.

“Normally, they would look to something like the Department of Transportation, which usually has large amounts of cash,” eCapitol news director Shawn Ashley said in his weekly interview with KGOU.

State Rep. Dan Kirby, R-Tulsa, speaks on the floor of the Oklahoma House in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2017. The House has voted to seat Kirby, who rescinded a letter of resignation he submitted after being named in a sexual harassment complaint.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

The Oklahoma House voted Tuesday to seat a lawmaker who walked back his resignation after being named in a sexual harassment complaint.

State Rep. Dan Kirby, R-Tulsa, spoke publicly for the first time about the situation, and said he had done nothing wrong.

“There was an investigation into the allegations and it was determined there was no sexual harassment,” Kirby said.

The complaint by a legislative assistant resulted in a nearly $45,000 settlement on Nov. 22.

State Rep. Dan Kirby, R-Tulsa, on the floor of the Oklahoma House of Representatives at the state Capitol in Oklahoma City, March 2, 2015.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

The Speaker-elect of the Oklahoma House of Representatives has announced plans for an investigation into a payment to settle a sexual harassment complaint by a former legislative assistant. 

Updated 1:23 p.m.

State Rep. Charles McCall, R-Atoka, announced Thursday his first action after officially becoming Speaker will be to authorize an investigation into the wrongful termination settlement agreement paid to Hollie Bishop, who was fired in November 2015 after less than a year working for state Rep. Dan Kirby, R-Tulsa.

Oklahoma State Capitol
LLudo / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Oklahoma's House Republicans picked their leadership for the next legislative session Tuesday, and formally elected state Rep. Charles McCall, R-Atoka, as the next House Speaker.

At the end of the 2016 session in May the caucus elected McCall as Speaker-designate, but yesterday allowed the 25 new GOP House members to weigh in on the leadership.

State Rep. Charles McCall, R-Atoka, in early May was tapped by his Republican colleagues to be their next leader.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Republicans in the Oklahoma House of Representatives last week chose a new leader for 2017: Charles McCall. The Republican is from Atoka in southeast Oklahoma, which could bring a unique perspective on water to the Capitol.

Big Fights Back Home

House Speaker-designate Charles McCall talks with fellow Republicans outside the GOP caucus room in the Oklahoma state Capitol Monday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Lawmakers decided who the next speaker of the Oklahoma House of Representatives will be during a closed-door meeting Monday. State Rep. Charles McCall, R-Atoka, defeated state Rep. Earl Sears, R-Bartlesville, for the leadership spot.

Sears, who’s the chairman of the House Appropriations and Budget Committee, will have to give up his House seat in 2018 due to term limits. McCall, who was first elected to the House in 2012, won’t be term-limited until 2024, although GOP caucus rules prevent a speaker from holding the post longer than four years, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

State Rep. Charles McCall (R-Atoka)
Provided / Oklahoma House of Representatives

Representative Charles McCall’s bill to allow counties to impose a tax on sand and limestone mining operations that sell their product elsewhere didn’t make it through the full House by the March 14 deadline.

But McCall, R-Atoka, says he will try again next year.