Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss two sides of international education. China has charged an education advocate in Tibet with inciting separatism, and a one-room basement library in Afghanistan is providing books to citizens once ruled by the Taliban.

Then contributor Joshua Landis talks with Jeffrey Mankoff from the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He argues the U.S. tried to outsource solving the Ukraine crisis onto German Chancellor Angela Merkel. They’ll also discuss Russia’s involvement in Syria.

Rebecca Cruise and Brian Hardzinski discuss Taiwan’s election of its first female president, and the outgoing leader’s visit to a small group of islands in the South China Sea. Both issues are causing problems with mainland China.

Then, a conversation with New York University historian Edward Berenson about the evolution of French jazz music during World War I and World War II, Josephine Baker, and the symbolism of the Statue of Liberty.

Taiwan's president-elect Tsai Ing-wen
CSIS | Center for Strategic & International Studies / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Earlier this month Taiwan elected its first female president in a historic general election that also saw a party other than the Kuomintang, or KMT, take over for only the second time since the Chinese Nationalists were driven from the mainland to the island by the Chinese Communists following the 1949 civil war.

President-elect Tsai Ing-wen leads the Democratic Progressive Party, or DPP. Historically, they've been a pro-Independence party, seeking to establish Taiwan as a truly unique nation rather than a state-in-exile.

Suzette Grillot talks with Thomas Fingar, the former head of the State Department's Bureau of Intelligence and Research. In the months leading up to the 2003 invasion, he cast doubts on whether or not Iraq had nuclear weapons.

But first, Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis discuss President Obama’s meetings with Chinese president Xi Jinping about cybersecurity, and Russian president Vladimir Putin over renewed tension in Syria.

President Barack Obama presents President Xi Jinping of the People's Republic of China with a gift of an inscribed redwood park bench at the Annenberg Retreat at Sunnylands in Rancho Mirage, Calif., June 8, 2013.
Pete Souza / The White House

President Obama and Chinese president Xi Jinping are meeting this week to discuss an arms deal for cyberspace. It’s the first of its kind – an agreement not to use cyber weapons to attack each other’s infrastructure. The move would protect things like medical facilities, cell phone towers, banking systems, and power grids.

T'ien-wen Chu's work 'Notes of a Desolate Man'
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Taiwan’s past is complicated, and with that comes a fraught linguistic history.

Dutch settlers colonized the small island nestled between the South and East China Seas during the 17th century, but its former name Formosa actually means “beautiful island” in Portuguese. Just a few decades letter, China’s Qing Dynasty drove European colonists from Taiwan and controlled it for the next two centuries, until they lost control of the island during the war with the Japanese in 1905.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the problem of shipping hazardous material in light of the Chinese port explosion, Amnesty International’s announcement that they want to see the sex trade decriminalized, and the African continent's first full year without a polio case.

Then, Suzette talks with Taiwanese author T’ien-Wen Chu. She won the University of Oklahoma's Newman Prize for Chinese Literature for her collection of short stories that intimately draws the reader into the text, and chronicles Taiwan's fraught linguistic past.

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss China’s expansion and development throughout South East Asia and beyond, and whether or not they’re becoming more audacious in their global development.

Then Suzette talks with Barak Barfi, a research fellow at the New America Foundation who spent his career studying Arab and Islamic affairs. We’ll discuss political development in Libya since the Arab Spring revolution.

Hong Kong and China flags
Whampoa Sports Club / Flickr

This week, KGOU’s World Views host Suzette Grillot and contributor Rebecca Cruise discuss China’s role as a global power and the ways in which it has been exerting that power.

China Finds Opportunity For Investment In Struggling Brazilian Economy

China is gaining ground in a land dispute with its neighbors - literally. Rebecca Cruise discusses the country’s rapid environmental transformation of an archipelago in the South China Sea.

Then Arun Gandhi, the grandson of legendary Indian civil rights leader Mahatma Gandhi, talks about lessons from his grandfather and applying his family’s legacy to the 21st century.

Satellite images from March 17, 2015 show new structures and construction equipment present on Mischief Reef in the South China Sea
DigitalGlobe/Asia Maritime Transparency Institute / Center for Strategic and International Studies

China is gaining ground in a land dispute with its neighbors – literally.

For decades, China, Vietnam, and the Philippines have fought over an archipelago known as the Spratly Islands.

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the so-called "Umbrella Revolution" protests in Hong Kong , and the closing arguments in the Bosnian war crimes trial of Radovan Karadžić in The Hague.

Later, a conversation with University of Waterloo political scientist Mariam Mufti. She studies electoral and party politics in South Asia, as well as democratization and regime change.

Demonstrators participating in Hong Kong's Umbrella Revolution - September 30, 2014
Pasu Au Yeung / Flickr Creative Commons

Tens of thousands of peaceful protesters have gathered on the streets of Hong Kong this week as part of a mass civil disobedience campaign to demonstrate against China’s increasing control of the electoral process in the region.

China’s National People’s Congress Standing Committee voted August 31 to fundamentally change the way Hong Kong picks its leaders by requiring voters to choose from a pre-approved slate of candidates in the upcoming 2017 elections.

India's prime minister Narendra Modi greets Chinese President Xi Jinping, September 17, 2014
Narendra Modi / Flickr

China’s President Xi Jinping paid a three-day visit to India this week to promote trade between the two countries as part of its broader initiative to strengthen regional economic cooperation.

Over the past few years China has been building ports and making strategic investments throughout South Asia as part of its “String of Pearls” plan, says Rebecca Cruise, Assistant Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma and a security studies and a comparative politics expert.

Rebecca Cruise reports on the Xi Jinping's tour of South Asia and its effects on the future of trade between China and those countries. She also outlines President Obama's strategy to help contain the Ebola outbreak devastating West Africa.

Later in the program, Suzette Grillot interviews groundbreaking social entrepreneur Paul Polak about his strategies for pulling people out of poverty around the world.