City of Oklahoma City

Workers install a stone façade outside one of four Senior Wellness Centers being built as part of Oklahoma City’s MAPS 3 program.
Samuel Perry / The Journal Record

Several Oklahoma City civic leaders gathered Tuesday evening for a town hall meeting to discuss the city’s 10-year general obligation bond issue, which voters won’t decide until next year.

Garland Moore

The City of Oklahoma City is going to try to reopen portions of the Northwest Expressway next week after the May Avenue bridge collapsed Thursday afternoon.

Updated May 20, 2015, 1:22 p.m.

Oklahoma City Public Works Director Eric Wenger said a quote this morning indicates it will cost about $55,000 and take months to repair the bridge.

The Oklahoma City Police Department's Honor Guard, 2015.
Oklahoma City Police Department / Wikimedia CC0 1.0

A large, phone-book type document.

That's how Mayor Mick Cornett described the proposed Oklahoma City budget for Fiscal Year 2017 unveiled during the city council meeting Tuesday morning.

The budget presentation begins at 24:00 into the meeting

Oklahoma City Hall
Caleb Long / Wikimedia Commons

Oklahoma City won’t be hiring new staff as it copes with lower tax collections.

City manager Jim Couch said during Tuesday’s city council meeting he's implementing a hiring freeze starting November 9.

Couch said sales tax collections for October were 3.2 percent below projections, and 2.6 percent below what was collected a year ago.

Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Oklahoma City covers more than 600 square miles, and completely surrounds several communities. That can lead to lost or delayed revenue, which is becoming even more problematic with the rise of so-called “gig economy” businesses like Uber, Lyft, and Airbnb.

During Tuesday’s city council meeting, Oklahoma City’s assistant treasurer Matt Boggs said Oklahoma City recapture $1.1 million in lost revenue during the fiscal year that ended June 30.

A motorist drives by a police barricade placed along Sheridan Avenue in downtown Oklahoma City in advance of a visit from President Barack Obama Wednesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

President Obama’s visit to Oklahoma dominated the news cycle this week, and basically shut down small portions of downtown Oklahoma City, Durant, Interstate 40 – pretty much anywhere inside a one-block radius of the president.

The White House provided only a six day heads up Obama was headed to Oklahoma, and that caused some rapid rearrangement of events in the area, according to The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt:

A view of Broadway Avenue from the Cox Convention Center in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Four months ago, Oklahoma City hit a snag on the long-awaited MAPS 3 convention center in downtown. In March, the city dropped a land bid for the location they wanted just south of the Myriad Gardens.

Oklahoma City budgeted $13 million for land acquisition, and the current owners wanted $100 million, so they had to figure something else out.

The city hired the consulting firm Populous to do that, and on Tuesday the group unveiled its site evaluations and made its pitch to the city council.

The unfinished American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

It's been almost a month since the end of the legislative session, and Oklahoma City leaders are now starting to address one of 2015's more closely-followed bills - the fate of the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City.

First National Center in downtown Oklahoma City, from the top of the Devon Tower.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

The fate of one of Oklahoma City's most historic skyscrapers could soon be determined.

A California developer told The Oklahoman he'll close later this summer on the purchase of the First National Center in downtown.

Stephen Goodman of the Pleastanton, California-based Goodman and Associates plans to start a $140 million redevelopment project next year that will turn the 1931 art deco building into a combination of offices, retail, restaurants, luxury housing, and a four-star hotel.

Taxis are parked outside Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The ride-sharing industry in Oklahoma has gone largely unregulated since Uber first arrived in Oklahoma City in 2013. The services have been challenged by limousine and taxi operators, but there’s little in the way of formal rules for how Uber, or its major competitor Lyft, can operate.

House Bill 1614 would change that. Whenever a driver turns on the app and are transporting or picking up passengers, a $1 million liability insurance policy would apply.

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