Cold War

World Views
4:30 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

World Views: November 8, 2013

Listen to the entire November 8, 2013 episode.

Earlier this week anti-American protests in Iran marked 34 years since the storming of the Embassy in Tehran, and the start of the 18-month hostage crisis. Suzette Grillot talks about the anniversary with Joshua Landis, who also provides a brief update on Saudi Arabia's frustration with the U.S. over Syria.

Later, a conversation with Boston University modern European historian Jonathan Zatlin. He says parts of Europe's debt crisis can be explained by religious tension between the Protestant North and the Catholic South.

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World Views
12:14 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Economic Lessons Europe Learned (Or Didn’t Learn) During The 20th Century

People walk past the former barrier between East and West Berlin after the Fall of Berlin Wall in November 1989.
Credit Raphaël Thiémard / Flickr Creative Commons

Listen to Suzette Grillot's conversation with Boston University historian Jonathan Zatlin.

Allied powers divided war-torn Germany into four zones of occupation after World War II, with three of those zones uniting in 1949 to form what became known as West Germany.

The Soviet Union controlled the fourth zone, and East Germany remained within the Eastern Bloc’s sphere of influence for the next four decades.

Boston University modern European historian Jonathan Zatlin says the divided nation served as a tripwire for all the tensions of the Cold War, and that Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin worried a united Germany posed a security risk.

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World Views: May 17, 2013
4:30 pm
Fri May 17, 2013

World Views: May 17, 2013

Listen to the entire May 17, 2013 episode.

University of Oklahoma political economist and European Union expert Mitchell Smith joins the program for a conversation about the eurozone's economy slipping further into recession, and the American kicked out of Russia over accusations of spying for the CIA.

Veteran diplomat Richard Arndt speaks with Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis about how the national security state changed U.S. diplomatic relations. He's the author of The First Resort of Kings: American Cultural Diplomacy in the Twentieth Century.

World Views
10:13 am
Fri May 17, 2013

Spy Vs. Spy: Latest Arrest Shows Cold War Still Resonates

Visitors flock to Red Square in Moscow
Credit Raul P / Panoramio

The embarrassing arrest of a suspected CIA officer in Moscow is the latest reminder that even after the Cold War, the United States and Russia are engaged in an espionage battle with secret tactics, spying devices, and training that sometimes isn't enough to avoid being caught.

"There's nothing new here," says Suzette Grillot, the Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma. "We spy, everybody spies. There's a long history of spying between these two countries."

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