cybersecurity

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the potential for a peace agreement between the Colombian government and the FARC rebel group, and the expanding U.S. and NATO military presence in central and eastern Europe.

Then, Suzette talks with Laura DeNardis. She’s an expert the global dynamics of internet governance, and we’ll talk about the development of the Domain Name System, or DNS, and the management of IP addresses.

dark keyboard and mouse
Michael Schreifels / Flickr

Cars, drones, refrigerators – almost everything is connected to the internet in some way, and that raises significant questions about control and governance. Who’s in charge, and who sets standards?

American University communications professor Laura DeNardis has studied these issues since the modern internet’s infancy in the 1990s. She told KGOU’s World Views countries, industry, and civil society work together in what she called “multi-stakeholder governance.”

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss this week's lockdown in Belgium due to security concerns after terrorist attacks in Pairs earlier this month, and the response of the citizens in Brussels.

Then Suzette talks with cybersecurity expert and former White House advisor Melissa Hathaway. She says security or resilience weren’t concerns as the Internet became a key component of the nation’s infrastructure.

illuminated keyboard
Jeroen Bennink / Flickr

For the past quarter century, communications technology has evolved and grown the point where practically every business, service, and family platform is connected to the internet.

But that interconnectivity was approached from a from a commercial development approach, according to cybersecurity expert Melissa Hathaway. That means the first-to-market, free market approach means security and resilience weren’t concerns as the internet was embedded in critical infrastructure.

Suzette Grillot talks with Thomas Fingar, the former head of the State Department's Bureau of Intelligence and Research. In the months leading up to the 2003 invasion, he cast doubts on whether or not Iraq had nuclear weapons.

But first, Rebecca Cruise and Joshua Landis discuss President Obama’s meetings with Chinese president Xi Jinping about cybersecurity, and Russian president Vladimir Putin over renewed tension in Syria.

President Barack Obama presents President Xi Jinping of the People's Republic of China with a gift of an inscribed redwood park bench at the Annenberg Retreat at Sunnylands in Rancho Mirage, Calif., June 8, 2013.
Pete Souza / The White House

President Obama and Chinese president Xi Jinping are meeting this week to discuss an arms deal for cyberspace. It’s the first of its kind – an agreement not to use cyber weapons to attack each other’s infrastructure. The move would protect things like medical facilities, cell phone towers, banking systems, and power grids.

Oklahoma Insurance Commission

Oklahoma Insurance Commissioner John Doak says a cyberattack that breached the security of health insurer Anthem, Inc., could affect some Oklahomans.

The stolen information includes names, birthdays, medical IDs, social security numbers, street addresses, email addresses, employment info and income data. The company is assessing the damage.

Anthem does not sell directly in Oklahoma, but Doak says some people in the state may have Anthem insurance through their employer. These Oklahomans will have an Anthem Blue Cross ID Card.

What Are You Agreeing To In Online Contracts?

Aug 6, 2014

Many Facebook users were recently surprised to find that they had agreed essentially to be part of a social science experiment for the company without any notification. However, they agreed by accepting the site’s privacy agreement, known as a wrap contract.

Samer Shehata joins Suzette Grillot to talk about democratic developments in Egypt, and how the conviction of journalists and questions about the fairness of May’s elections have affected the country’s relations with the United States.

Later, a conversation about police cooperation and Europe’s internal security policy with Canisius College political scientist John Occhipinti.

JurgenNL / Wikimedia Commons

Europol, based in The Hague, Netherlands, is the European Union’s police office. Staffed by high-level police officers from the 28 EU member states, John Occhipinti says it functions as the “hub of a liaison network” that manages a database of criminal intelligence.

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