cybersecurity

Oklahoma Insurance Commission

Oklahoma Insurance Commissioner John Doak says a cyberattack that breached the security of health insurer Anthem, Inc., could affect some Oklahomans.

The stolen information includes names, birthdays, medical IDs, social security numbers, street addresses, email addresses, employment info and income data. The company is assessing the damage.

Anthem does not sell directly in Oklahoma, but Doak says some people in the state may have Anthem insurance through their employer. These Oklahomans will have an Anthem Blue Cross ID Card.

What Are You Agreeing To In Online Contracts?

Aug 6, 2014

Many Facebook users were recently surprised to find that they had agreed essentially to be part of a social science experiment for the company without any notification. However, they agreed by accepting the site’s privacy agreement, known as a wrap contract.

Samer Shehata joins Suzette Grillot to talk about democratic developments in Egypt, and how the conviction of journalists and questions about the fairness of May’s elections have affected the country’s relations with the United States.

Later, a conversation about police cooperation and Europe’s internal security policy with Canisius College political scientist John Occhipinti.

JurgenNL / Wikimedia Commons

Europol, based in The Hague, Netherlands, is the European Union’s police office. Staffed by high-level police officers from the 28 EU member states, John Occhipinti says it functions as the “hub of a liaison network” that manages a database of criminal intelligence.

The giant retailer Target continues to feel the fallout from a massive security breach at its stores. The latest revelation: Hackers who stole credit and debit card numbers this holiday season also collected encrypted personal identification numbers.

But Brigitte Clark had no worries as she left a Target in Los Angeles on Saturday morning, her cart full of groceries.

The European Union is now pledging to help Italy after a boat capsized last week and killed hundreds of African migrants. Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss how European governments are struggling with refugee and asylum policies.

Richard Clarke is famously known for criticizing the Bush Administration for not doing enough to stop 9/11.  But he now focuses on issues of cybersecurity and intellectual property theft, especially by the Chinese government.

Aude / Wikimedia Commons

Former counter-intelligence czar Richard Clarke is best known for testifying before the 9/11 Commission that President George W. Bush failed to take enough action to protect the country ahead of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

Since leaving the Bush Administration in 2003, Clarke has turned his attention to cybersecurity. He’s the author of the 2010 book Cyber War: The Next Threat to National Security and What to Do About It.

“I think for a lot of people a threat is not a threat unless people die,” Clarke says. “But hundreds of billions of dollars move. Cyber crime works.”