David Cid

Legacy Of The Oklahoma City Bombing

Apr 20, 2015
The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building on May 19, 1995, exactly one month after the bombing. It was demolished four days later.
Than217 / Wikimedia Commons

What does the Oklahoma City bombing mean now, two decades later? Will the memory and meaning of April 19, 1995, gradually recede into a distant echo?

That's hard to believe as one considers the extensive observances and media coverage this month. The grief and shock of what happened are as palpable as ever: On a sunny Wednesday morning, a terrorist bomb ripped apart the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, killing 168 men, women and children. Those who saw it will never forget the black smoke rising in the sky, the bloody images of the  injured, and the wreckage of the  building marring the downtown skyline.

This multimedia story, including a video and a podcast, revolves around a question: What has changed because of the bombing? Oklahoma Watch spoke with several experts or leaders about their views on the impact of the worst act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history.

Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism Logo
Provided / Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism

An Oklahoma City-based institute that offers free counterterrorism training to police officers may be shutting down.

The Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism has trained more than 16,000 police officers since 2000. But in September the institute lost its federal funding, which it gets from the Department of Homeland Security, and is now in danger of closing.