KGOU

David Holt

Golden State Warriors' Kevin Durant, center, speaks as coach Steve Kerr, left and general manager Bob Myers listen during a news conference at the NBA basketball team's practice facility, Thursday, July 7, 2016, in Oakland, Calif.
Beck Diefenbach / AP

The Golden State Warriors formally announced the signing of former Oklahoma City Thunder star forward Kevin Durant on Thursday. Durant publicized his decision Monday, but Thursday marked the first day free agents could sign their deals. He agreed to a two-year contract worth more than $54 million.

During a news conference at the team's practice facility in downtown Oakland, Durant said the relationships he built in Oklahoma City made the decision to leave difficult.

Gov. Mary Fallin speaking at the 2013 Governor's Energy Conference in Tulsa, Okla.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin on Friday signed into law legislation that banks boom-time tax revenues to cushion the state during energy downturns.

The Energy Revenues Stabilization Act was created through House Bill 2763, authored by Rep. John Montgomery, R-Lawton. The measure siphons off above-average tax revenues levied on corporations and oil and gas production and saves it in an account that can be tapped during state funding emergencies.

$100 bills, money, cash
401(K) 2012 / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Gov. Mary Fallin signed a bill Thursday that would allow Oklahomans whose assets are seized through the civil asset forfeiture process to recover their attorney fees.

State Sen. David Holt, R-Oklahoma City, says his legislation will encourage people to fight back if their property is taken.

Adam Burnett / KGOU

The debate between privacy and security is now in Oklahomans’ wallets.

The federal REAL ID Act requires identification cards – like state-issued drivers’ licenses – to include features that enhance security and detect fraud. But fears about government overreach led to a 2007 state law that prohibits Oklahoma from taking steps to comply with REAL ID.

Teachers and education supporters rally at the state Capitol in Oklahoma City in March 2015, asking for better pay.
Emily Wendler / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

State. Sen. David Holt is proposing $10,000 teacher pay raises over the next few years, and says it’s possible without raising taxes.

His plan is three-pronged. School districts would be consolidated and excess money would go to teacher pay. All revenue growth after fiscal year 2017 would go directly to raises, and the state would find another $200 million by reforming tax credits.

Holt said legislators have a moral obligation to raise pay, and help solve the teacher shortage.

Oklahoma State Senator David Holt, R-Oklahoma City.
Oklahoma Senate

State Sen. David Holt has introduced legislation to set the cap on the state’s Rainy Day Fund at 15 percent of the total state budget, rather than the much smaller general revenue fund certification number.

"Our state's Rainy Day Fund is 15 percent of about $5 billion. But our total state budget is about $24 billion,” Holt said. “So it's no wonder it's inadequate."

The New Orleans/Oklahoma City Hornets take on the Phoenix Suns on April 6, 2007 during the team's second and final season in Oklahoma City.
David Holt

If you follow state Sen. David Holt on Twitter, you may have noticed a recurring hashtag over the past month or two. #10YearsBigLeagueCity. He was marking the anniversary, and the decade that’s passed, since Oklahoma City got its first taste of professional basketball.

Oklahoma Capitol Building
ana branca / Flickr

The Oklahoma Senate has approved Open Records Act legislation that would limit access by the public and media to audio and video recordings obtained from equipment attached to a law enforcement officer or vehicle.

The Senate voted 46-0 for the House-passed bill Tuesday and sent it to a joint House-Senate conference committee for more work. Its Senate author, Republican Sen. David Holt of Bethany, says lawmakers are working with law enforcement and media representatives to fashion the bill's final form.

Oklahoma State Senator David Holt, R-Oklahoma City.
Oklahoma Senate

More than a third of Oklahoma's eligible voters aren't registered, so lawmakers are considering allowing online registration to make the process more convenient and renew interest in elections.

State Election Board statistics show that more than 2.1 million people were registered to vote in January 2005. Ten years later and about 10 percent more residents, 119,280 fewer Oklahoma residents were registered to vote.

Last year's general election drew less than 30 percent of Oklahoma's eligible voters.

Oklahoma State Senator David Holt, R-Oklahoma City.
Oklahoma Senate

Public and media access to police footage from cameras worn by officers or in their patrol cars has led to a clash over Oklahoma's Open Records Act as police and prosecutors seek to limit what kinds of videos are publicly released.

Advocates for more government openness raised concerns after a bill in a House committee was amended to gut a law that allows the public to access government records.

Rep. Mike Christian, a former Oklahoma Highway Patrol trooper and the committee's chairman, acknowledged his amendment went too far and says he will work with prosecutors, police and the press on a compromise.

Meanwhile, freshman Democratic Rep. Claudia Griffith, who authored the original bill, said she would not bring it to her colleagues without a major rewrite.

"In no way will I let it be heard on the House floor in this way," said Griffith, D-Norman. Her original bill would have let police hold back videos from dashboard cameras and other records that might be used as evidence in criminal trials.

At issue now is how much access the media and public should have to police videos. In a letter to police chiefs across the state, Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater urged departments not to outfit their officers with body-worn video cameras until the Open Records Act can be changed.

"My biggest concern is to protect law enforcement officers, victims, witnesses and the integrity of law enforcement investigations," Prater said. "There is a lot of privacy interests involved here."

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